Who Let The Dogs Out Class Chant

The Wild Untold Story Behind ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’

I’m not sure where we came from. Is it possible that we are alone in the universe? Is there a deity or a god? The following are only a few of the major unresolved issues of our day, with maybe none larger than: Who let the dogs out of the house? Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof. With this statement from Ben Sisto, who appears in the new documentary Who Let the Dogs Out, which premiered on Saturday at SXSW, he is largely joking. There’s an entire documentary dedicated to the indelible Baha Menearworm, the cacophonous clangs of steel drums and club beats that, thanks to its seemingly incomprehensible chant and hook, blanketed the entire universe in calypso barking during its irritating radio reign in 1999 and 2000, before setting up permanent residence in the devious corner of your brain that has randomly played the song once a month for the last 20 years, apropos of nothing.

For the song’s central questions, Sisto spent eight years studying and writing about them.

What is the song even about, and what does it mean?

While sitting in an airport lobby one day and being bored, he came up with the query, which led him all over the world from the Bahamas to London and on to Seattle, Jacksonville, and the town of Dowagiac in Michigan to find out the answer.

  1. It’s been 20 years, and we’re still not sure who it was that let those damned dogs out in the first place.
  2. He has a valid argument.
  3. Sisto came upon an article about the song’s tenth anniversary in 2008 and decided to write about it.
  4. Keith, on the other hand, did not have a last name.
  5. Sisto was unemployed, unattached, and a little bored at the time of the interview.
  6. Who was responsible for letting “Who Let the Dogs Out” out?
  7. Taylor offers a condensed version of the narrative of how the song came to be.
  8. Taylor and the Baha Men were present when he delivered it.
  9. Eventually, of course, he persuaded them, and the song went on to become a hit, earning Greenberg and the Baha Men their first platinum record, a Grammy, and widespread recognition.

Who did it is a tangled web of he-said/she-said that spans the globe and involves a novelty act named Fat Jakk and His Pack of Pets, club music producers known as 20 Fingers, Canadian radio hosts, the Seattle Mariners, two teenagers from Jacksonville, Florida, and a high school football team, as Sisto chronicles in detail.

  • Keith Wainwright was the owner of a salon in London called Smile, which gained notoriety during the early days of the United Kingdom punk scene.
  • He continues returning, bringing home cassette cassettes and CDs of music he heard at a carnival in the area that he had previously attended.
  • Anslem Douglas’ song “Who Let the Dogs Out” was discovered by Jonathan King, a record producer for the Genesis band.
  • Fat Jakk and His Pack of Pets was the moniker given to the song by King, who recorded it himself and published it under the guise of a Caribbean accent to disgrace himself.
  • In this interview, Sisto talks with Douglas about the song’s roots and how it came to be written as a female empowerment anthem.
  • He had become tired of hearing the disparaging name “skettel,” which loosely translates as “slut,” being hurled at women in the workplace.
  • He already stated as much in an interview posted on his website in 2016: “When I used the term ‘party,’ I was using it as a metaphor,” he explained, alluding to the song’s lyrics.

If you hear the ‘Yippie Yi-Yo,’ it must mean that everyone is pleased, right?

‘Until the guys start calling the girls by their first names / And then the girls reply to the call.’ Men began calling the women skank and skettel, as well as any other derogatory term they could come up with.

“Who let the dogs out?” says a woman after the dogs have run away.

It is at that point that the dogs, to put it another way, truly come out.” In this interview, Sisto talks with Douglas about the song’s roots and how it came to be written as a female empowerment anthem.

Douglas is the songwriter who is officially credited with the song.

Several years ago, Douglas’s brother-in-law worked for a Canadian radio show, where two producers claim they were the ones who came up with the phrase, which they used as a radio jingle for several years before Douglas’s brother-in-law brought it to him.

Also worth mentioning is the work of Ossie Gurley, a music producer who is labeled as “arranger” on the Douglas album where “Who Let the Dogs Out” can be found.

Douglas and Gurley were involved in a legal dispute that was finally settled out of court.

/ Woof woof woof woof” (who let the dogs loose?) before either Gurley or Douglas.

In addition, John Michael Davis, a graduate of Dowagiac Union High School in Michigan, has a video of his football team utilizing the chant in 1990, which he shared with me.

How important was it for the Seattle Mariners’ music programmer, who began utilizing the song as Alex Rodriguez’s entrance music in 2000, to catapult the song into the stratosphere and rocket it into orbit?

The response is that there is no such thing as an answer.

The song has earned a place in the Hall of Fame of Innocuous Music Sensations with the “Macarena” and “The Hustle.” When a music is both everywhere and nothing at the same time, it genuinely does feel like it manifests itself in some way.

So, what is Sisto’s opinion on the matter? At this point, it’s merely a song that belongs in the pop cultural canon. In a sense, we’ve all let the dogs out of the bag.” Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof. Woof.

“Who Let the Dogs Out?” Apparently Austin’s Reagan High School Is to Thank (or Blame) for the Baha Men Hit

The SXSW premiere of documentary director Brent Hodge’s Who Let the Dogs Outwould have been entertaining to see even if it had just been half as intriguing as it was. As it tries to figure out where the title 2000 Baha Men song came from, the film is a fascinating story about how ideas can infiltrate society’s collective unconsciousness, spread virally even in the pre-internet era, and become cultural touchstones that can travel around the world even before anyone makes money off of the global phenomenon.

  • Some people may be astonished to find that Reagan High School in Austin looks to be the correct answer.
  • It also goes back even further, to a pair of Canadian radio DJs who used the song as a radio jingle in the mid-nineties.
  • If you’re having trouble keeping up with everything, that’s quite understandable.
  • However, while the details are intriguing, they aren’t really the focus of the story.
  • Thanks to Hodgee Films for their assistance.
  • They discovered that it was utilized as a rallying cry by a high school football team in Michigan on their road to a state title, with players performing it during rallies and warmups as a call-and-response exercise.
  • Through research of newspaper and television news archive material, the filmmakers discovered that the chant had been used in sports across the country for several years, both before and after the Michigan school’s inception.
  • It moved fast from one city to another and from one state to another.
  • It was the current Reagan High School band that performed this song at the film’s SXSW debut, which effectively brought the story full circle.
  • It is the ultimate purpose of the documentary to demonstrate that a meme such as “Who Let the Dogs Out?” appears to have no one source of genesis.
  • And in some ways, it belongs to everyone.

However, it’s possible that the first people to use the chant did so in Austin, as a show of support for Reagan High School sports—but it’s also possible that whoever started doing it at Reagan did so simply because they recognized the elemental energy of an eternal question about dogs and who let them out, as well as the percussive force of a bark that followed.

“Who Let the Dogs Out” looks to be the property of Reagan High School at the time, but in reality, it is the property of all of us. Subscribe to our weekly e-newsletter.

Unraveling the 20-Year Mystery of How ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’ Became a Global Phenomenon

A chant from college football that originated in the mid-1980s. A collection of lyrics scrawled on the back of a Little Caesars sandwich bag. Keith is a punk rock hairstylist that works in the music industry. These are just a few of the apparently odd, but very necessary, elements of Baha Men’s 2000 smash “Who Let the Dogs Out,” which Rolling Stone once labeled the third most irritating song of all time (after only Los Del Rio’s “Macarena” and the Black Eyed Peas’ “My Humps”). Despite the fact that it’s been more than two decades since the novelty hit’s first release, its unbelievably infectious hook is no doubt still firmly entrenched in your memory.

So much so that the song’s begrudging appeal made its way to the Grammys, which are the music industry’s most prestigious awards show.

Despite the fact that “Who Let the Dogs Out” never made it past the top 40 in the United States, it topped the charts in Australia, reached number 2 in the United Kingdom, and sold millions of copies internationally.

When Baha Men were asked “Who Let the Dogs Out” during a World Series game in 2000, they had already gotten embroiled in a far more interesting, canine-free mystery: who was ultimately responsible for the song in its original form?

Who, What, Where, Why, and When?

While the Bahamian group known as Baha Men was responsible for making “Who Let the Dogs Out” a popular question, they never claimed to have authored it. Even after hearing Anslem Douglas’ first version of the song, which was far more frantic and soca-infused, according to band member Dyson Knight, it took some persuading to even convince the band to record it in the first place. However, Baha Men’s manager, Steve Greenberg, who had previously guided Hanson to chart-topping success, was convinced that the release of “Who Let the Dogs Out” would turn the band’s fortunes around.

  • Greenberg had just discovered the tune by chance after meeting Jonathan King, one of the more unusual musical eccentrics in the United Kingdom.
  • Greenberg admitted to King that it was one of the worst things he had ever heard, but he still saw the song’s potential to be a smash despite his reservations.
  • King’s hairdresser, on the other hand, may lay claim to being just as—if not more—important to the company’s success.
  • It was Anslem Douglas who gave the woofs on this occasion, the guy who has subsequently contended that the seemingly innocuous song should be regarded as a genuine feminist anthem rather than a throwaway tune.

Many people have claimed authorship of the song’s earworm chorus, despite the fact that there is no disagreement over who created the song’s man-bashing lines (“Get back gruffy, mash scruffy/Get back you flea-infested mongrel” and “Get back you flea-infested mongrel”).

Who Put theWoofin theWoof, Woof, Woof, Woof?

Douglas’s contribution to the “Who Let the Dogs Out?” mystery is that he confesses that the song’s famous chorus was first heard by him via his brother-in-law, who used to work for a Canadian radio show at the time. “Who was it that let the hounds out? This particular jingle was composed by Patrick Stephenson and Leroy Williams, two producers who previously worked for that particular radio station. As a result, Douglas was compelled to recognize their participation in an out-of-court settlement agreement with them.

On the back of a Little Caesars bread bag in 1992, adolescents Brett Hammock and Joe Gonzalez, better known as Miami Boom Productions, created a hook that was identical to this one.

Another idea elegantly completes the circle by tying everything together cleanly.

A video filmed at Austin’s Reagan High School reveals that the school’s call-and-response system was initially used in a sports setting considerably earlier than that: a football pep rally in 1986.

A Dogged Journey Toward the Truth

It is explored in much greater depth in the 2019 documentary Who Let the Dogs Out?, which explores the slightly ludicrous but utterly fascinating story that revolved around the song. The hugely entertaining film, directed by Brent Hodge (A Brony Tale, I Am Chris Farley), sees artist/curatorBen Sisto deliver a TED Talk-style lecture about his eight-year journey to uncover the truth about the song’s origins, interspersed with interviews with all of the key players. The film is available on Netflix.

  1. “Without a doubt, it’s Steve Greenberg,” says the narrator “According to Sisto, writing for Mental Floss.
  2. It was his marketing savvy, industry connections, and genuine devotion to the band that resulted in the music erupting on the charts.
  3. “The a cappella rendition of Baha Men starts the show.
  4. Before the listener has a chance to analyze what the phrase “Who Let the Dogs Out” actually means, he or she is whisked away to a world of pop, junkanoo, and barking that is at once catchy and irritating, head-bobbing and soul-screaming “he explains.
  5. What exactly does it require of us?
  6. Somehow, I believe it is the sense of ambiguity that draws people in.
  7. Even while Sisto acknowledges that the origins of “Who Let the Dogs Out” may stretch back even longer than Greenberg’s interpretation of the song, his search for the song’s origins appears to have come to a stop at this point.

As a result, we may never be able to determine who was responsible for allowing those annoying mutts to escape.

‘Who Let the Dogs Out?’: How a song defined the 2000 Mariners

Nothing about the events of June 22, 2000, suggested that it would go down in history. However, that day would go on to become one of the most significant in the history of the Seattle Mariners. Because that happened to be the day when someone let the dogs outside. Nothing about the events of June 22, 2000 suggested that it would go down in history. However, that day would go on to become one of the most significant in the history of the Seattle Mariners. As a result of the fact that someone let the dogs out on that particular day, the Mariners adopted a song that would appear on a “worst songs of the ’90s” list despite the fact that it was released in 2000.

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It was played 10,000 times at Safeco Field over a brief summer season, and it became so unironically popular that the band was invited to perform in center field.

About the song

The album was released on July 26, 2000. Woof, woof, woof woof, who let the dogs out, who let the dogs out, who let the dogs out, who let the dogs out It reached the top of the Billboard Mainstream Top 40 chart, where it peaked at No. 18. Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording (2001 Grammys). Notable: It was featured in the film “Rugrats in Paris.” During that season, “we were sold out every day,” says Paul Abbott, a pitcher for the squad. “Every time ‘Who Let The Dogs Out’ came on, there were 48,000 people singing along with it.

  1. “It was our theme tune,” says the band.
  2. The Mariners signed up for a promotional service that gave them something called CDs, which could be played in order to hear new music, according to reports.
  3. It was a big hit with him.
  4. Believe it or not, there was a time when athletes did not select their own music, instead putting their fate in the hands of team staff to decide.
  5. A short trip from the on-deck circle to the batter’s box separated Oliver from his teammates on June 22, 2000.
  6. A piece of music began to play as he went up to the plate.
  7. He was a bit of a dinosaur.

on the Mariners and Ken Griffey Sr.

However, this…

Also, it’s catchy.

The tune began to play once more.

The music began to play once more.

Because baseball is a rather superstitious sport, the song was kept in the game.

After that, the tale took a dramatic turn.

Edgar Martinez has a total of 145 runs batted in.

Raul Ibanez was a 28-year-old role player who played a variety of roles.

Before signing with the Texas Rangers, A-Rod blasted 41 home runs and placed third in the MVP voting in his final season with the New York Yankees.

Rodriguez, it appears, also desired the film “Who Let the Dogs Out.” “Are you sure?” Greene inquired after hearing this.

In the middle of an interview, Greene approached A-Rod and inquired as to whether or not he really, genuinely wanted to hear “Who Let The Dogs Out” every time he batted.

He believed it sounded like it was coming from Miami.

Oliver was completely unaware of this.

They played in center field and declared their allegiance to the Mariners until the Mets took notice of their performance and invited them to perform at the World Series.

The Mariners were defeated by the Yankees in the American League Championship Series in six games in 2000.

The men in charge of letting the dogs out, on the other hand, are unable to avoid the song.

In his own words, “It was a genuine theme song for me,” he added, “and it was a season that I will never forget.” Thanks to his pitching coach, Paul Abbott, he is being reminded of his historical significance with the Mariners these days.

“As I previously stated, it was a catchy melody.

Even today, he is presented to the public through the 2000 season and the song that was previously dubbed “the worst song ever.” In the words of Greene, “I’ve joked with my pals about how I think that’s going to be on my gravestone.” “This is Gregg Greene’s last resting place.

Annoying?
In a poll conducted in 2007 by Rolling Stone to identify the 20 most annoying songs, ”“Who Let the Dogs Out” ranked third.
Song Artist
1. “My Humps” Black Eyed Peas
2. “Macarena” Los Del Rio
3. “Who Let The Dogs Out” Baha Men
4. “My Heart Will Go On” Celine Dion
5. “Photograph” Nickelback
6. “Mambo No. 5” Lou Bega
7. “You’re Beautiful” James Blunt
8. “Wannabe” Spice Girls
9. “The Thong Song” Sisqo
10. “Believe” Cher
11. “Barbie Girl” Aqua
12. “Tubthumping” Chumbawumba
13. “Cotton-Eyed Joe” Rednex
14. “Blue” Eiffel 65
15. “Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm” Crash Test Dummies
16.“I Would Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)” Meatloaf
17. “Bye, Bye, Bye” ‘NSYNC
18. “Livin’ La Vida Loca” Ricky Martin
19. “Closing Time” Semisonic
20. “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” Wham!

Lyrics for Who Let The Dogs Out by Baha Men – Songfacts

  • Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? hey, Yippie, Yi, Yo, when the weather was good, the party was rockin’ And everyone is having a good time. Hey, yippee, yippee, yippee, yippee I tell the lads to quit calling each other names like Hey, Yippie, Yi, and Yo. Then the females answer the phone when the call comes in. I hear a woman exclaim loudly. Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? I see your small speedboat making its way up our shore. She genuinely wants to get out of town. Get ruffy, get scruffy on your way back. Bring your flea-infested mongrel back to me. I’m going to convince myself that I’m not going to become furious. Hey, yippee, yippee, yippee, yippee To hear dem females refer to them as canines is hilarious. Hey, yippee, yippee, yippee, yippee They, on the other hand, say, “Hey dude.” That is a component of the party Hey, yippee, yippee, yippee, yippee They had a woman in front of them and a male behind them. I hear a woman exclaim loudly. Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? If a canine doesn’t have a bone, he’s not much good. Everyone’s a dog who’ll hold ya’ bone, every dog who’ll hold it Doggies are nothing if they aren’t provided with a chew toy. Dogs will hold your bone, and dogs will grip your boneWho let the dogs out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? I see your small speedboat making its way up our shore. She genuinely wants to get out of town. Get your hair back fluffy, or your hair back scruffy. Bring your flea-infested mongrel back to me. If I were a dog, I’d say The party is about to begin, and I’ve got my mind set on getting my girl. Do you see the rays of light that are emanating from my eyes? Walking through the area like a digi-man and just tearing everything up My white socks and I are together. I’m short and can’t see color well. I don’t care what color you are, I’m thinking that’s why they call me a pit bull. Because I’m the ruler of the nation, when people see me, they exclaim “oooooh.” Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Who was it who let the hounds out? Who, who, who, who, who, who, who, who? Anslem D Douglas and Osbert Leopold Gurley are the authors of this work. Songs Trust Avenue, WYZ GIRL ENT. CONSULTING LLC and Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC are among the publishers. BMG Rights Management, Spirit Music Group, and BMG Rights Management are among the other rights holders. Licensing for and provision of lyrics byLyricFind

A brief oral history of Baha Men’s ‘Who Let The Dogs Out’

A five-word phrase that caught the nation’s collective imagination during the summer of 2000 was proclaimed the ultimate jock song by sports stadiums and youngsters with landlines: “Who Let the Dogs Out.” 15 years later, Entertainment Weekly sought out some of the main members behind the Bahamian group to discuss the impact of their enormous, unquestionably unpleasant earworm. STEVE GREENBERG is a record producer who says: This man came in to pitch his album, Fat Jakk and His Pack of Pets, right after Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago in 1998, and it just…wasn’t a nice record, to say the least.

  1. Anslem Douglas came up with the name “Doggie” for the original.
  2. I ultimately caved in to the urge and said, “I’m going to do this with the Baha Men,” as the story goes.
  3. When he contacted me in the Bahamas, I initially refused to answer the phone.
  4. GREENBERG:It had already been a hit in Isaiah’s world, but for someone else, and he didn’t know it.
  5. It took him a few moments to wrap his brain around it.
  6. He didn’t specify what his strategy was, but he did state that he had one.
  7. I knew it had to be done by someone who was of Caribbean descent in order to be truly authentic.

And I was disappointed because I had written a song but had found no one to perform it.

We were fortunate to locate these three young men who were excellent singers and dancers, as well as being really personable, and they completely transformed the atmosphere of the group.

For the song “Who Let the Dogs Out,” Greenberg and producer Mike Mangini flew the band to Miami, where they recorded the vocals at Mangini’s home studio.

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But I was simply thrilled to be in the studio and in a professional recording atmosphere where I could be productive.

It seems like there were hours and hours of singing.

This was not a quick 15-minute recording session.

It’s a whole different experience.

It was completely prepared to face the world.

“Here’s the first album I’m going to put out,” I remarked as I stepped into their office and handed them the record.

In a dramatic moment, the general manager switched on the radio and declared, “This is what Z100 sounds like.” What do you think?

As the first artist signed to Greenberg’s label, S-Curve, the Baha Men became the label’s first signing.

AT THE TIME, ARTEMIS RECORDS’ DANIEL GLASS was the company’s president.

We were a little independent label.

It was a high-stakes gamble, but I was confident that it would sell like hotcakes.

Take a peek at the Billboard Hot 100 chart and you’ll see that “Who Let the Dogs Out” reached at about number 40.

There was always someone who didn’t care for it for every person who did enjoy it.

The spark brought it to the attention of the public, and the athletes and children took advantage of the opportunity.

When I had a buddy who had previously worked as a radio promo person, I contacted him and told him, “I want you to figure out who chooses the records at every baseball stadium in the country, and I want you to work with that guy as if he were a program director of a radio station.” And then he goes out and convinces pretty much everyone on the face of the planet to listen to this album, which had never been played before.

  • That was indeed the breakthrough.
  • GLASS: Our head of marketing was quite knowledgeable in the field of sports marketing.
  • We mailed it to every football, baseball, basketball, soccer, and hockey team in the country.
  • It was like entering a another planet, where the programmer at the sporting venues took on the role of a real person.
  • After their season finished, the Baha Men had grown to such prominence that they were literally being flown all across the country to stadiums to perform on the field before important games for teams.
  • Our phones are blazing with activity, as the cliché went.
  • It was the young children who were making the phone calls to the request lines.

This was a group of young children who wanted to yell “who let the dogs out.” TAYLOR: At first, I couldn’t make out what was going on.

It was at that point that I recognized one thing for certain: this song was massive.

We flew back and forth throughout almost the entire country and the world.

CAREY: We were in our twenties at the time, and we had an abundance of energy to burn.

It was a mad dash.

I simply happened to be living there, guy.

When you have a hit song like that, everyone falls in love with you.

In my own case, because I was the one who had to sing it all the time, I can say that I absolutely became weary of it—anyone who has to sing a song that many times would naturally become bored of it—but when we got on stage to perform the song, we were as if we were doing it for the very first time!

  • GREENBERG: We were working on the sports element at the same time as we were working on this arrangement with Nickelodeon.
  • This item was sought after by both Disney and Nickelodeon for use in their respective films, and both companies were tripping over each other to outbid the other on the item.
  • After the album’s initial run of 3 million copies sold out, bidding wars erupted for the exclusive licensing rights to the song.
  • GREENBERG: Nickelodeon was important because they had a feature called Nick Video Picks, which was quite popular.
  • That was a major development.
  • It was our life’s purpose to do this.
  • CAREY: We were still in the throes of the single’s triumph at the time, but it was a bittersweet experience.

But what do you do with the song’s popularity after it becomes popular?

Without a doubt, this is not the case.

GLASS: I can’t image what would have happened if YouTube had been available.

In order to get the Baha Men on the air during the World Series week, we had the Today Show, Good Morning America, and CBS This Morning all bidding against each other.

GLASS: One of the more amusing stories is that they completed a west-to-east coast voyage in 48 hours, I believe.

And the joke was that they didn’t have any clothes on!

We had to acquire them jackets, scarves, and caps to keep them warm.

TAYLOR: We performed at the Billboard and ESPY Awards, which is when we met Toni Braxton and Destiny’s Child, if I recall correctly.

When we went to promote our records, they were right there to be seen by everyone.

The next thing you know, they’ve invited us to a nightclub where we’ll be sharing the VIP experience with them, and we’re hanging out and chilling while dancing.

The ensemble received a Grammy for Best Dance Recording in 2001, despite the fact that the song was panned by critics and oversaturated radio stations and stadiums.

I believe a large number of the group’s members will agree with me.

TAYLOR: I believe that the Grammy Awards are the pinnacle of achievement for everyone.

GRAMMY: The Grammy was a major vindication for Greenberg.

Whenever I started a new job at a new label, the first thing I did was sign the Baha Men, which was a tradition for me.

As a result, this was significant.

It has had a significant positive impact on our tourism industry.

And it’s still the same way now.

One of the things I like about the Baha Men is that they’re not really a one-hit wonder, because the fact is that there’s a generation of youngsters who are equally familiar with the song “Move It Like This.” GLASS:a It’s pretty difficult A R situation.

You make an effort to establish credibility, and you recruit talented songwriters.

To be quite honest, I don’t recall any of the other songs on the CD.

The good thing about it is that a group like them can make their entire career out of that single song.

I’m not sure whether they ever had another one like it after that.

GREENBERG: Thousands of people lined the streets as we traveled around the entire island of Nassau in convertibles, carrying our Grammys in our hands.

For me, the icing on the cake came at the conclusion of the procession, when the Prime Minister presented me with the key to the city as a thank you for my contribution to making it possible.

CAREY: It’s opened opportunities for me that I could never have imagined.

The group has now reshuffled its ranks, and they will release their first new album in 10 years, Ride With Me, in September, as a result of their efforts.

Image Original publication of this article appeared in the September 11th edition of Entertainment Weekly. Purchase a copy of the magazine on newsstands now, or subscribe digitally at ew.com/allaccess.

r/todayilearned – TIL: The pop song “Who Let the Dogs Out” by Baha Men (2000) was a feminist-themed protest against cat-calls.

A five-word phrase that caught the nation’s collective imagination during the summer of 2000 was “Who Let the Dogs Out.” Sports stadiums and kids with landlines dubbed it the ultimate jock song. More than a decade later, Entertainment Weekly sought out some of the main figures behind the Bahamian band to discuss the impact of their enormous, unquestionably unpleasant earworm. Records are produced by Steve Greenberg (Steve Greenberg). This man came in to pitch his album, Fat Jakk and His Pack of Pets, after Carnival of 1998 in Trinidad and Tobago, and it just…wasn’t a good record, to put it mildly.

By Anslem Douglas, the original was known as “Doggie.” The thought would come to me every now and again, and I’d think to myself, “If I can figure out how to make this record correctly, I could have a major hit.” I ultimately succumbed to the temptation and said that I was going to do this with the Baha Men.

  • In the Bahamas, I first refused to answer his phone call when he contacted me there.
  • The song had already become a smash in Isaiah’s world, but for someone else.
  • It took him a few moments to wrap his brain around it, though.
  • The strategy wasn’t revealed, but he did state that he was working on it.
  • In it to be real, I knew it had to be done by someone from the Caribbean.
  • And I was heartbroken because I had written a song but had no one to perform it with me.
  • As a result of our efforts, we were able to recruit these three young men who were excellent singers and dancers with a lot of charisma, and they really transformed the atmosphere of the group.

“Who Let the Dogs Out” was recorded in Mangini’s home studio in Miami, thanks to a trip to Miami by Greenberg and producer Mike Mangini.

The fact that I was in the studio and working in an industry-standard atmosphere was enough to have me giddy with excitement.

Voices continued to blare for a long time.

A 15-minute recording session was not included in this endeavor.

The two are very unlike to one another.

In all seriousness, it was prepared to face the outside world.

GREENBERG: “Here’s the first album I’m putting out,” I told them as I strolled into their office.

The general manager performed this really theatrical thing in which she switched on the radio and declared, “This is what Z100 sounds like!” What do you think?

As a result of my realization, the album would never be released if I signed this contract.

Baha Men had two platinum albums in Japan, and an independent label volunteered to finance the single, which was then distributed by the distribution companies Edel and Artemis, who Greenberg claims brought the track to retail and radio “in about five seconds.” AT THE TIME, ARTEMIS RECORDS was led by Daniel Glass, who served as its president.

  • The label we worked for was an independent one.
  • Even though it was a hazardous move, the company felt confident in its ability to generate significant revenue from the product.
  • On the Billboard Hot 100, “Who Let the Dogs Out” reached at about number 40, according to the artist.
  • There was always someone who didn’t like it for every person who did.
  • Those involved in sports and children seized the opportunity when it was thrown in their faces by the spark.

When I had a buddy who had previously worked as a radio promo person, I contacted him and told him, “I want you to figure out who chooses the records in every baseball stadium in the country, and I want you to work with that guy as if he were a program director for a radio station.” He agreed.

  • In fact, that was the breakthrough.
  • Our head of marketing was an expert in the field of sports marketing, says GLASS.
  • The letter was given out to every team in every sport (football, basketball, soccer, and hockey).
  • When the programmer at the sporting venues took on a personality of his own, it was like entering a new planet.
  • After their season finished, the Baha Men had grown to such prominence that they were practically being flown all across the country to stadiums to perform on the field before key games for teams.
  • Our phones are blazing with activity, according to the expression.
  • These requests were made by small children who called the helplines.

Children wanted to chant “who let the dogs out,” and this was their way of doing it.

We were probably in Sweden at the time, and when the phone came in telling us that we were number one in Israel, I understood there was no doubt about it: this song was going to be massive.

Flights back and forth took us pretty much all across the country.

CAREY: We were in our twenties at the time, and we had a plenty of energy.

Everything happened in a jiffy.

Heh, I simply happened to live there, dude!

Having a successful song like that makes you popular amongst the masses.

For the record, I can only speak for myself because I was the one who had to sing it over and over again: I definitely got tired of it—anyone who has to sing a song over and over would naturally get tired of it—but when we got on stage to perform it, it was as if we were performing it for the first time.

  • When we were working on the sports element, we also worked on a contract with Nickelodeon, which we completed at the same time.
  • This item was sought after by both Disney and Nickelodeon for use in their respective films, and both companies were tripping over each other to outbid the other in the bidding process.
  • A bidding war erupted for the exclusive licensing rights to the song after the album’s initial run sold 3 million copies.
  • Nickelodeon was important because they had a program called Nick Video Picks, which was a hit with the kids.
  • that night.
  • The three of us rallied the troops and encouraged everyone we knew to cast as many votes as they could every time we were in the three….
  • For the record, we were well aware that winning the Nick Video Pick was the most critical thing we could do on that particular day.
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On occasion, I wished they would pay more attention to our other songs, which I thought they should have done.

What do you do when you no longer want to spend your attention on something?

The key is to keep going and to take advantage of the situation while it is still favorable.

What a monster that would have turned out to be.

In your imaginary world, things like these don’t really happen.

Perhaps they might have completed their tour in two days, visiting cities such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Las Vegas before returning to New York.

It was November in New York, and they wore no garments on their backs or shoulders!

Despite the fact that they had been working on the west coast, we did not provide them with even a single five-minute break.

They were huge admirers of the group, CAREY:Child Destiny’s When we were promoting our recordings, they were always in the front row with us.

They invite us to a nightclub where we will be sharing a VIP area with them, and we spend the rest of the night hanging out, chilling, and dancing.

The trio received a Grammy for Best Dance Recording in 2001, despite the song being panned by critics and being oversaturated on radio and in stadiums.

I believe a large number of the group’s members will agree with me on this point.

The Grammys, in my opinion, are the pinnacle of the entertainment industry.

A great vindication came in the form of the Grammy.

I used to sign the Baha Men as soon as I started a new job at a new label, and that was the first thing I did when I started.

The significance of this is enormous.

When it comes to tourism, it has done a lot for us.

The situation remains unchanged.

This is something I appreciate about the Baha Men: they’re not only successful because of one single; there’s a whole generation of youngsters who are also familiar with the song “Move It Like This.” GLASS:a It’s pretty difficult A R thing to figure out right now.

To establish credibility, you must recruit outstanding songwriters.

To be quite honest, I have no recollection of the other songs on the CD.

In this case, the good news is that a band like that can make their entire career out of that single song.

After that, I’m not sure whether they ever had another one.

Thousands of people lined the streets as we traveled around the entire island of Nassau in convertibles, carrying our Grammys in hand.

As for me, the cherry on top came at the conclusion of the procession, when the Prime Minister presented me with the key to the city as a thank you for my contribution to making it possible.

CAREY: There are opportunities I never would have imagined.

It has subsequently been announced that the group would reassemble with a new lineup, and they will release their first new album in 10 years in September entitled Ride With Me.

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The Baha Men Are Still Going Strong, Even if They Can't Remember All the Words to 'Who Let the Dogs Out'

A five-word phrase that caught the nation’s collective imagination during the summer of 2000 was “Who Let the Dogs Out.” Sports stadiums and kids with landlines proclaimed it the “ultimate jock song.” EW followed out some of the key individuals behind the Bahamian group fifteen years later to discuss the impact of their enormous, unquestionably harsh earworm. STEVE GREENBERG is a record producer who says, This man came in to pitch his album, Fat Jakk and His Pack of Pets, right after Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago in 1998, and it just…wasn’t a good record.

Anslem Douglas created the original, which he named “Doggie.” Occasionally, the thought would enter my mind, and I’d think to myself, “If I can find out the correct method to do this record, I could have a major success.” I ultimately succumbed to the temptation and said that I would do this with the Baha Men.

  1. When he contacted me in the Bahamas, I initially refused to answer.
  2. GREENBERG:It had already been a smash in Isaiah’s world, but for someone else.
  3. It took him a while to wrap his mind around it.
  4. He didn’t specify what his strategy was, but he did acknowledge that he had one.
  5. I understood it had to be done by a Caribbean person in order to be real.
  6. And I was heartbroken because I had written a song but had no one to perform it.
  7. We were fortunate to locate these three young men who were excellent singers and dancers, as well as being really personable, and they completely transformed the atmosphere of the group.

For the song “Who Let the Dogs Out,” Greenberg and producer Mike Mangini flew the band to Miami, where they recorded vocals at Mangini’s own home studio.

However, I was simply thrilled to be in the studio and in a professional recording setting where I could be productive.

It seemed like there were hours and hours of singing.

Obviously, this wasn’t a 15-minute recording session.

It’s a whole different story.

It was truly prepared to face the world.

“Here’s the first album I’m going to put out,” I remarked as I stepped into their office.

In a dramatic moment, the general manager switched on the radio and declared, “This is what Z100 sounds like.

As the first artist signed to Greenberg’s new label, S-Curve, the Baha Men became his first signing.

DANIEL GLASS, ARTEMIS RECORDS’ PRESIDENT AT THE TIME: The first hurdle we had to go over was convincing record stores to carry this album.

“Whatever you want to get, order triple,” Danny Goldberg and I told the leaders of every retail company, including Trans World, Target, Best Buy, and HMV.

Greenberg admits that the song was not a major hit on the radio.

It was far too divisive.

It didn’t do well in the research department, therefore it didn’t survive very long on the air, but it was adequate.

The song took a significant detour away from two things: children and sports.

That was the true breakthrough.

GLASS: Our head of marketing has a lot of experience in sports marketing.

We distributed it to every football, baseball, basketball, soccer, and hockey team in the country.

It was like entering a new planet, where the programmer at the sporting venues took on the role of a real person.

After their season finished, the Baha Men had grown to such prominence that they were literally being flown all across the country to stadiums to perform on the field before key games for teams.

Our phones are blazing with activity, as the cliché goes.

It was the young children who were making the calls to the request lines.

It was a group of small children who wanted to yell “who let the dogs out.” TAYLOR: At first, I didn’t understand what was going on.

We built stadiums, arenas, and just about everything else you could think of.

I believe we departed for Europe one day, returned to the United States, and then returned to Europe the next night.

We’d find ourselves performing twice or three times a day, yet there would be no hassles.

It was a lot of hard work, but it was also a fresh and exciting experience.

It felt as though a dream had been realized.

The audience was always enthused about what was going on.

The audience was always able to breathe fresh life into it.

It ultimately came down to a bidding war between Nickelodeon and Disney.

In the end, Nickelodeon offered the band their own half-hour live performance special, and they also covered the cost of the video.

Nickelodeon beat Disney to get it in front of kids; the New York Mets used it as their theme song for the 2000 World Series; and the Baha Men featured in Apple advertisements, on The Simpsons, at MTV’s star-studded World AIDS Day event, and at Al Gore’s Election Day rally.

Every afternoon, they would show you 15 seconds of three different videos and then lead you to their website, where you could vote on which of the videos you wanted to have shown in its full at 8 o’clock at night on Nickelodeon.

The three of us rallied the troops and encouraged everyone we knew to cast as many votes as they could each time we were in the three.

We were quite aware that winning the Nick Video Pick was the most crucial thing we could achieve that day for the record.

There were moments when I hoped that they would genuinely pay attention to our other songs instead of ignoring them.

Do you stop concentrating on it?

You have to keep going and milk it while it’s still fresh.

It would have been a terrifying creature.

That sort of stuff only occurs in your dream world.

They might have performed in Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Las Vegas before returning to New York in two days.

When they woke up, it was November in New York, and they had no clothing.

They’d been working on the west coast, and we didn’t give them even a five-minute break.

THE GROUP: Destiny’s Child was a huge admirer of the group.

As it happens, we’ll be traveling to Europe at the same time as the same promotional trip.

Beyonce’s father is of Bahamian descent.

CAREY: For me, the Grammys were the pinnacle of my career.

Receiving the greatest honor that could be bestowed upon a person in the music industry was undoubtedly one of the most memorable moments of our professional lives.

I don’t care who you are, if you’re in the music business, everyone wants to be nominated for a Grammy.

My buddies and I used to make fun of the Baha Men when we were younger.

People thought it was a joke, but I had a lot of faith in these men!

A lot was accomplished as a community, as people, and as a nation through the film “Who Let the Dogs Out.” It was also about advertising the Bahamas as a destination.

Visitors working in the tourism industry in this area will tell you that they had to hire for all of the people who came to seek for the Baha Men.

GREENBERG: With their following single, they had a very, very little hit, and we went back and made another album, which had a pretty decent-sized hit on it called “Move It Like This.” One of the things I like about the Baha Men is that they’re not really a one-hit wonder, since the fact is that there’s a generation of youngsters who are equally familiar with their song “Move It Like This.” GLASS: It’s a pretty difficult A R situation.

You’re attempting to construct an album that will generate follow-up hits.

It’s difficult.

It’s really difficult to follow up on such a massive hit.

The drawback is that the impact feels like an albatross around your neck.

THE FINAL CHAPTER: In May of 2001, a parade was conducted in the Bahamas in commemoration of the Baha Men, who were (supposedly) the first Bahamians to win a Grammy Award.

It seemed a little strange to be honest.

Leaving aside the fact that the Bahamas is a nation, not a city, it was an unforgettable experience for me—and I still have the key to prove it!

What I’ve done might be explained to my children, but they would not believe me unless I showed them the photographs.

The Baha Men released the track ” Off The Leash” in June to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the release of “Dogs.” According to Carey, “It honors the lengthy history of ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’ and how far it has progressed.” “I think it’s only fitting that we write a song to commemorate this occasion.” Image This article first appeared in the September 11th edition of Entertainment Weekly.

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