Who Plays Kansas City War-chant

Celebrating the Kansas City Chiefs, the Chop Divides (Published 2020)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The city of Kansas City is home to the University of Missouri. Two Denver Broncos fans were in town for a game last month and were standing at the bar, engaged in some friendly ribbing with fans of the Chiefs, who were in town for a game at The Rieger same night. It wasn’t long before the Broncos supporters made their way through the dining area. That’s when aChiefsfan reacted with a gesture that has become as iconic with the franchise as the club’s red uniforms: With his hand in the air, he chopped through the air, all the while chanting in time to the beat of the music.

The Chiefs’ beloved football team has left an indelible mark on the culture of this city, whether it’s the tradition of wearing red on Fridays before games or the practice of changing the final line of the national anthem to “and the home of the Chiefs” before kickoff at Arrowhead Stadium, which is the team’s home stadium.

Now that the Chiefs are competing in the Super Bowl for the first time in 50 years on one of the largest platforms in sports, there is renewed interest in the long-standing tradition.

A popular way for many sports fans to show support for their team while also intimidating the opposition is to use the chop and its accompanying chant, which includes a pantomimed tomahawk motion and a made-up war cry that is also used by fans of the Atlanta Braves, the Florida State Seminoles, and the Exeter Chiefs rugby team in England.

Rieger chef and owner Howard Hanna expressed his disappointment as the impromptu chop played out in his restaurant.

“It gives us a bad reputation.” As a result, the Chiefs have managed to stay out of the fiercest flames of the national debate about Native American mascots and images in sports.

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Over the past six years, the group has collaborated with Native Americans to reexamine and alter some of its long-standing practices. Following that discussion, the club issued a statement forbidding spectators from wearing in Indian garb and requesting that broadcasters abstain from panning to any who do not comply with the request. During occasional games, the team makes instructional remarks regarding Native American history and customs, and a group of Natives distributes literature outside the stadium.

The Chiefs, on the other hand, have showed little interest in stopping their fans from being ejected from the stadium.

Several players have expressed gratitude for the tomahawk chop and chant, which they said helped them get pumped up.

When asked about worries that it is offensive, he responded, “I have nothing to do with that and I know nothing about that.” It was Marty Schottenheimer, then the head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, who encouraged fans to do the chop during a performance by the Northwest Missouri State band, which at the time was led by a Florida State alumnus.

The Arrowhead Chop is a nickname given to the gesture in honor of the Kansas City Chiefs’ stadium.

John Learned, a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho unified tribes, was the leader of a small group that, in 2013, persuaded the Chiefs to abandon customs that featured non-Native persons clothing in the manner of Native people.

According to him, “we aren’t going to go after the chop since it is one of a kind.” “It serves as a rallying call for our group.” Some more established Native groups claim that the Chiefs have disregarded them, despite the fact that the club has referred to its partnership with Learned as evidence of its outreach to indigenous communities.

It is the opinion of the local Indian population on the tomahawk chop that varies, according to Crouser, from those who believe it is OK to others who are outraged by it.

According to the survey, which will be published in the academic journal “Social Psychological and Personality Science,” opposition was even stronger among individuals who often participated in Native rituals, with 65 percent stating that the chop offended them.

As Stephanie Fryberg, a Tulalip professor and researcher at the University of Michigan, put it, “There is no way that the usage of Native Americans as mascots is honoring.” “It’s all a trick of the light.” Some Chiefs fans are conflicted about the tomahawk chop; they understand why Native Americans would find it disrespectful, but they insist that they use it to praise their team, not to denigrate Indians.

The team would have to lead the campaign to do rid of the chant, according to a number of supporters who stated they had no problem with it being replaced with anything else.

This is just that kind of caught-up-in-the-moment collective excitement,” said Parker, a fan from Prairie Village, Kansas, a suburb of Kansas City that is a 10-minute drive southwest of the city.

“I don’t think they should be offended,” Shirley stated emphatically.

‘Anyone who knows Kansas City, and especially anyone who has gone to Arrowhead Stadium, understands that we are a terrific place,’ Lucas remarked. Ken Belson and Ben Shpigel contributed to this story with their reporting.

Tomahawk chop – Wikipedia

It is most commonly used by fans of the AmericanFlorida State Seminoles, Atlanta Bravesbaseball club, Kansas City ChiefsAmerican footballteam, and the EnglishExeter Chiefsrugby unionteam to celebrate victories in sporting events. Performing the “chop” at the high school level, where hundreds of teams continue to use Native American names and images, has played a role in the push to modify these traditions. In order to replicate atomahawkchopping, the forearm is moved forwards and backwards repeatedly with an open hand.

Additionally, the Atlanta Braves created a foam tomahawk to go along with the fan activities.

Florida State University

Tomahawk Chop for the Florida State Seminoles It is not known when the tomahawk chop first appeared on the scene. However, according to a formerFlorida State Universitypresident, it was created by theFlorida State University Marching Chiefs in the 1980s to serve as a supplement to their war cries. According to another source, it was originally played in 1984 by students from the inter-fraternal association known as “The Scalp-Hunters,” which was in charge of the FSU band. Following that, supporters of the Florida State Seminoles took to the streets to demonstrate their support.

It is a phrase that we did not pick and that we do not use on a formal basis “…..

Kansas City Chiefs

During a performance by the Northwest Missouri Stateband, conducted by 1969 Florida State graduate Al Sergel, the Chiefs heard the chant for the first time in November 1990. “It is a direct descendent of Florida State,” said Phil Thomas, the Chiefs’ director of promotions and marketing. “The band started executing the tomahawk chop, and the players and (coach)Marty Schottenheimer were all really enthusiastic about it.” At home games, the Tomahawk Chop has become something of a pregame ritual….

A former player or local celebrity will also hammer on the drum while the audience does the Tomahawk Chop in a more recent version of the Tomahawk Chop.

Atlanta Braves

Fans of the Atlanta Braves performing the tomahawk chop The tomahawk chop was popularized by Atlanta Braves supporters in 1991, when the team won the World Series. While some have attributed Deion Sanders with bringing the chop to Atlanta, it was Braves organist Carolyn King who first began performing the “tomahawk song” in the 1970s. It took a few seasons before King began playing the “tomahawk song” before at-bats, but when the Braves started winning in 1991, the song gained popularity among the fans.

It was described as “a proud show of togetherness and family” by the Braves’ public relations director in response.

The chief informed her that abandoning her position as organist would have no effect on anything and that “they would find someone else to play” if she did go.

It was the last official act performed at Turner Field before the Braves moved to SunTrust Park, and it was the last official act performed at Turner Field before the Braves moved to SunTrust Park.

Foam tomahawk

In sports, an afoam tomahawk is a rubbersports paraphernalia item (similar to an afoam No. 1 finger) in the shape of an atomahawk that is frequently used in conjunction with the tomahawk chop. They were initially used in 1991 by the Atlanta Braves baseball club, who had adopted the tomahawk chop as a part of their offensive strategy.

Creation

Paul Braddy, a foam salesperson, is credited with inventing foam tomahawks. When he heard Skip Caray state during a radio broadcast of an Atlanta Braves game that the team needed tomahawks to go with their recently acquired tomahawk chop celebration, he approached the Braves’ concessions manager, John Eifert, and suggested a foam rubber tomahawk as a possible solution. Braddy made a tomahawk out of foam with an electric knife and presented it to Eifert, who consented as long as they cost less than $5.

It wasn’t long before the foam tomahawks were extremely popular with Braves fans at the Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium—so popular that Braddy was able to abandon his $60,000 per year sales position in order to devote his full time to the production of foam tomahawks, producing as many as 8,000 per day.

He was approached by Major League Baseball a month into the enterprise, who claimed that the foam tomahawk infringed upon the Atlanta Braves’ copyrighted tomahawk emblem, which he refused to acknowledge.

Controversy

Because of the use of foam tomahawks, Native American organizations have expressed concern that it is “demeaning” to them and have asked for its prohibition. It was described as “a proud show of togetherness and family” by the Braves’ public relations director in response. Braddy was preparing to explore sponsorship agreements with the Florida State University Seminoles, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the Washington Redskins American football teams, as well as other colleges with Native American mascots, in anticipation of a prospective ban on Native American symbols.

Exeter Chiefs

The name “Chiefs” was first used by the English rugby side Exeter Chiefs, who won the Premiership in 1999. Following their promotion to the English Premier League in 2010, they began employing the Tomahawk chop in conjunction with the war chant. Sandy Parkas well as a chant by their traveling fans during rugby matches elsewhere in the United Kingdom, they utilize it as their walk out music at Sandy Parkas well. Several Exeter Chiefs fans began a petition in June 2020, demanding for an end to the team’s usage of Native American iconography, especially the Tomahawk chop, and for the club to cease using such imagery.

Reports said that the “tomahawk chop chant” will no longer be included in BT Sport’s simulated crowd sounds during Exeter Chiefs games staged behind closed doors and televised on the BT Sport platform beginning in August 2020.

Controversy

The use of the tomahawk chop has prompted accusations that it is a slap in the face of Native American tradition. It was also condemned for being a euphemism for the once prevalent practice ofscalping. Shortly after the Atlanta Braves adopted it, there were a number of calls from Native Americans urging Braves supporters to refrain from doing the tomahawk chop during games. Prior to the 1991 World Series, a group of Native Americans demonstrated outside the Metrodome to express their opposition to the Braves’ use of the tomahawk chop.

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Native American organizations petitioned the Kansas City Chiefs in 2016 to discontinue performing the tomahawk chop.

The editorial board of the Kansas City Star newspaper has advocated for the abolition of the so-called “Arrowhead Chop” by the end of 2019, citing resistance from Native Americans and Tribes, as well as the fact that the practice caricatures and dehumanizes Native Americans, among other things.

  • Since then, the topic has remained, and it made national headlines once more during the 2019 National League Division Series.
  • Louis Cardinals relief pitcher and Cherokee Nation memberRyan Helsley responded positively.
  • According to the Braves, they will “continue to assess how we activate components of our brand, as well as the overall in-game experience” and that they would “continue to speak with folks in the Native American community” when the postseason finishes.
  • After the Cleveland Indians and the Washington Redskins revealed that they were exploring a brand change in July 2020, the franchise faced increased pressure to update its image.

The Braves issued a statement stating that conversations regarding the rebranding were still underway, but that the team name would not be changed in the meanwhile.

In popular culture

Several people have expressed concern that the tomahawk chop was making light of Native American culture. Aside from that, it was called out for being an allusion to the formerly prevalent practice of scalping. Shortly after the Atlanta Braves adopted the tomahawk chop, a number of Native American organizations called for Braves supporters to refrain from doing the gesture. Several Native Americans demonstrated outside the Metrodome prior to the 1991 World Series in protest of the Braves’ use of the tomahawk chop.

  • Earlier this year, the Gill-Montague Regional School Committee, a local school board in Massachusetts, outlawed the usage of the gesture at school athletic events, claiming that it was insulting and discriminatory in nature.
  • This same year, the Exeter Chiefs were approached with a similar proposition.
  • With regard to politics, during the 2012 Senate election in Massachusetts, workers of candidateScott Brownwere caught performing the tomahawk chop at a campaign rally towards supporters of Elizabeth Warren, in order to discredit Warren’s claim to be descended from Native Americans.
  • When questioned about the chop and chant throughout the series, St.

‘The yelling and arm movements of the supporters were offensive,’ Helsley said, adding that the cut depicted Indians “in this kind of caveman-type people way, who aren’t smart.’ When the series went to Atlanta for Game 5, the Braves decided to discontinue the distribution of foam tomahawks, the playing of chop music, and the display of the chop graphic.

To begin discussing a road ahead, the Atlanta Braves met with representatives from the National Congress of American Indians during the offseason.

It was announced by the Braves in a statement that conversations over the rebranding were still underway, but that the team’s name would not be altered.

References

  1. Jeremy Engle is a writer who lives in the United States (January 31, 2020). Are Native American names, imagery, and gestures offensive when used by sports teams and their fans?” the question asks. The New York Times (New York)
  2. Cori Urban is a woman that lives in the city (March 25, 2019). “The Turners Falls High School ‘tomahawk chop’ continues to be prohibited by the board of education.” ‘Mass Live’ is an abbreviation for “Mass Live.” Shelby Miller is a young woman who lives in the United States (March 6, 2019). ‘Toledo school gets rid of its contentious Indian mascot and Tomahawk Chop chant,’ says the newspaper. The KIRO 7 News
  3. AbL.V. Anderson’s blog (September 26, 2012). “The origins of the tomahawk chop: Scott Brown’s workers ridiculing Elizabeth Warren are carrying on a long-standing tradition.” ” Slate.com. Obtainable on February 23, 2017
  4. Ab “The “Tomahawk Chop” first appeared in a Florida State vs Auburn football game in 1984.” Savannah Now, August 8, 2006. Savannah Now, August 8, 2006. The original version of this article was published on February 24, 2017. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  5. Retrieved on February 23, 2017
  6. Fsu is no longer the only one who can do the Tomahawk Chop-It. The Sun Sentinel published this article on October 9, 1991. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  7. Leslie Aguilar is a writer who lives in Los Angeles (September 10, 2020). “Chiefs supporters react to the team’s decision to replace the tomahawk chop and headdress.” KCTV5. abShultz, Jeff (November 15, 2020)
  8. AbShultz, Jeff (July 17, 1991). “Tomahawks or scalpers, what do you think? Fans erupt in applause “….. In the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on June 25, 2020, it was said that Terrence Moore is a writer and director who lives in Los Angeles (August 9, 1991). WAVE is encouraged to be tomahawked by organist Carolyn King, who transforms the waveform into an irregular ripple. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published this article. Anderson, Dave (October 13, 1991). “The Braves’ Tomahawk Phenomenon”. The New York Times. RetrievedJune 25, 2020
  9. AbcAnderson, Dave Wilkinson, Jack (February 23, 2017)
  10. AbWilkinson, Jack (October 8, 2004). “She’s down to her last few chops.” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published this article. TEGNA was retrieved on June 25, 2020. (October 3, 2016). For the final time, the Atlanta Braves turn out the lights at Turner Field. 11alive.com. Obtainable on February 23, 2017
  11. Abcd On October 13, 1991, the New York Times published an article titled “Sports of the Times – The Braves’ Tomahawk Phenomenon.” Obtainable on February 23, 2017
  12. Abc It’s not chopped liver when you have 200,000 foam tomahawks. The 11th of October, 1991, according to Bloomberg. “Carving may be done with electricity,” says the author on February 23, 2017. The Baltimore Sun published an article on November 12, 2008, titled On February 23, 2017, Dave Anderson was able to be reached (October 13, 1991). Sporting News – Tomahawk Phenomenon Among Atlanta Braves”, The New York Times (July 19, 2013). Gabe Hiatt’s article from March 26, 2017 was retrieved. “Winning the Super Bowl might help Atlanta shed its reputation as a terrible sports town,” says the author. The Washington Post is a newspaper published in Washington, D.C. C. Craig Davis (February 23, 2017)
  13. CRAIG DAVIS (September 14, 1991). “Braves’ Park Is Now a Tomahawk Shop,” according to the article. The Sun Sentinel is a newspaper published in Florida. Ed Oldfield was able to get a hold of the information on February 23, 2017. (August 3, 2016). When is it appropriate for the Exeter Chiefs to lay down their tomahawks? The Exeter Express and the Exeter Echo are both daily newspapers in Exeter. The original version of this article was published on October 10, 2016. Chris Hewett, a Rugby Union Correspondent, provided the following information on February 23, 2017: “Exeter does have a humorous side, but no one is laughing right now.” The Independent is a newspaper published in the United Kingdom. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  14. Devon is on the line. Thursday, March 4, 2011 It has been the soundtrack of Exeter Chiefs’ recent success, and it is a chant that everyone knows. Western Morning News is a daily newspaper published in Western Canada. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  15. Club is a group of people that get together to socialize and have a good time (December 30, 2011). “Pay attention to the Exeter Chiefs’ battle cry.” Telegraph. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  16. Andrew Aloia’s full name is Andrew Aloia. “Exeter Chiefs fans are at odds over the team’s usage of Native American logos.” BBC Sport is a sports broadcaster. retrieved on the 8th of July, 2020
  17. David Parsley is a writer and musician from the United Kingdom. “The Exeter Chiefs are under fire for their use of ‘racist’ Native American branding and chanting.” It was retrieved on June 30, 2020, from iNews. BT Sport has a tomahawk chop set for the Exeter Chiefs’ tomahawk chop set by Howard Lloyd. Devon Live is a television show that airs on the BBC. retrieved on August 8, 2020
  18. Retrieved on August 8, 2020
  19. Mike Bates is the author of this work (May 1, 2013). “Yes, the “Tomahawk Chop” is a source of irritation for me. Here’s what I mean: “….. According to SBNation, “Do you think it’s time to put the tomahawk away?” was published on February 23, 2017. The Sun Sentinel published this article on October 20, 1991. Miranda Davis, Miranda Davis, Miranda Davis, Miranda Davis, Miranda Davis, Miranda Davis (November 28, 2016). “The Tomahawk Chop will be reviewed by the district following the Turners Thanksgiving game.” Recorder.com. Ariel Rothfield (February 23, 2017) was able to get a hold of the information (January 15, 2016). “Kansas indigenous organization asks Kansas City Chiefs fans to discontinue the Tomahawk chop,” according to KSHB (Kansas Public Broadcasting). The original version of this article was published on December 28, 2016. retrieved on February 23, 2017
  20. EdOldfield is a fictitious character created by EdOldfield (August 8, 2016). An e-mail from a member of the Crow Creek Dakota Sioux tribe to the Exeter Chiefs rugby team was received. The Exeter Express and the Exeter Echo are both daily newspapers in Exeter. The original version of this article was published on August 9, 2016. On February 23, 2017, the Editorial Board released a statement (November 1, 2019). ‘Stop the Offensive ‘Arrowhead Chop,’ it’s time to start a new Chiefs tradition,’ says coach Andy Reid. The Kansas City Star published this article. “Scott Brown Staffers Perform a ‘Tomahawk Chop’ during a Rally,” which was retrieved on January 20, 2020. According to ABC News. The 25th of September, 2012. Edwards, Johnny (March 23, 2017)
  21. Retrieved March 23, 2017
  22. (October 13, 2019). “Tomahawk chop is deemed ‘inappropriate’ by chiefs of Georgia’s indigenous tribes.” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published this article. Ken Rosenthal’s article from October 24, 2019 was retrieved (July 7, 2020). “The Braves are debating whether or not to employ the Tomahawk Chop, but they are not debating their name.” Robin Gets Another Shot!” onYouTube, retrieved on July 8, 2020
  23. The Athletic, retrieved on July 8, 2020

Chiefs under pressure to ditch tomahawk chop

4th of February, 2021 The pressure is building on the Super Bowl-bound team. The Kansas City Chiefs have decided to end a famous ritual in which fans erupt into a “war chant” while using a chopping hand motion meant to resemble a Native American tomahawk while cheering for their team. The team’s chop tradition and even its name have long been criticized as being derogatory to American Indians, but national attention has been focused on the Washington football team’s use of the name Redskins and the cartoonish Chief Wahoo logo, which has been used as an emblem for the Cleveland Indians baseball team for decades.

  • Several Native American organizations have joined together to put up billboards in the Kansas City region to express their opposition to the tomahawk chop as well as the Chiefs’ name.
  • A few thousand individuals have signed two online petitions, one of which was created by a fourth-grader and the other by an adult.
  • Gaylene Crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian Center, on the other hand, thought the change was ridiculous.
  • As a result, they continue to play that terrible Hollywood Indian tune, which is such a clichéd Indian song from old cowboy movies, or something like that.
  • “It’s not like their supporters are behaving any differently either,” says the author.
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As the season progresses, we will continue to make adjustments, ideally adjustments that achieve our goals of respecting and honoring Native American history while also celebrating the fan experience.” However, the Florida Indigenous Rights and Environmental Equality organization, located in St.

  1. The group plans to demonstrate near the stadium on Sunday before the game’s beginning, singing and brandishing placards.
  2. “And that is a fantastic start, but the supporters are still acting as if they are in an indigenous-type environment since you are still referred to as the Chiefs, which is unfortunate.
  3. It’s a little ridiculous.
  4. Kile Chaney, a 42-year-old stone mason from Harrisonville, Missouri, described the song as a “rally cry” when the team is struggling.
  5. Aaron Bien, a 61-year-old Hillsdale, Kansas, automotive repair and body shop owner, described it as “no different than any other cheer.” “It is the essence of one’s being.
  6. “It has absolutely nothing to do with Native Americans,” he said, adding that the origin of the team’s nickname may have more to do with the mayor of Dallas who was instrumental in luring the franchise to the city in 1963.
  7. Roe Bartle was affectionately known as “The Chief” because of his many years of service as a leader in the Boy Scouts of America.
  8. According to Vincent Schilling, associate editor of Indian Country Today, this doesn’t make the situation any better at all.
  9. Young participants are referred to as “braves,” and the top leader is referred to as the “chief.” As a member of the St.

Marching Chiefs offer to play War Chant at Super Bowl for Kansas City Chiefs

  • It’s possible that you’ve been listening to the Kansas City Chiefs’ journey through the NFL Playoffs while inside Arrowhead Stadium and recognized a familiar song. A recording of the War Chant music made popular by the Florida State marching band, the Marching Chiefs, has been played over the stadium sound system at home games by the Chiefs for many years. The spectacle has made its way around Florida State University fans, who can’t help but notice the familiar music when they are watching the Chiefs play. FSU men’s basketball is ranked No. 5 for the first time in over 50 years. More:Unselfishness and tenacity help propel FSU into the Associated Press No. 1 rankings. Men’s basketball’s top five teams T.J. Rushing, former Florida State defensive backs coach, has been hired away by Texas A M. Having advanced to the Super Bowl for the first time in 50 years after defeating the Tennessee Titans 35-24 at home on Sunday, the Chiefs Marching Band has offered their services for the big game, which will be held at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium on February 2 against the San Francisco 49ers, to be played at the Hard Rock Stadium. “Greetings, @Chiefs. If you need the War Chant completed properly, we’re available and only a few of hours away. Please contact us “The Marching Chiefs’ official Twitter account shared the news. Hey, Chiefs, if you need the War Chant done correctly, we’re available and only a few of hours away from where you are. Please contact us. — The Florida State University Marching Chiefs (@FSUChiefs) The 19th of January, 2020 David Plack, the Florida State University Director of Athletic Bands and co-director of the Marching Chiefs, sent out the tweet while waiting for his flight back to Tallahassee on Sunday. According to Plack, who spoke to theDemocrat, “that’s just my tongue in cheek way of claiming we’re the pioneers and that no one does it better.” “My Packers have been eliminated, therefore go Chiefs!” While it would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the majority of current members of the band, this would not be the Marching Chiefs’ first appearance at the Super Bowl. At Super Bowl XVIII in Tampa Stadium, the Chiefs, together with the University of Florida Gator Band, provided the halftime show entertainment for the crowd. It’s only right that Florida State would represent the Chiefs in Super Bowl LIV, considering that both FSU graduates who will be competing in the game are on the Kansas City roster. Derrick Nnadi, a former Florida State defensive tackle, and Cameron Erving, a former Florida State offensive lineman, will both be participating in their first Super Bowls as members of the Chiefs. Nnadi even responded to the Marching Chiefs’ post with three emojis that represented thought. Plack stated that he has not received a response from the Chiefs and does not anticipate to. The Chiefs have a commitment of their own booked for Super Bowl Sunday in Tallahassee, so it’s probably for the best that they don’t play in the game. They’re scheduled to play in Ruby Diamond Event Hall at 2 p.m. as part of the PRISM performance, which is an annual partnership concert of ensembles from throughout the Florida State University College of Music. Curt Weiler can be reached at [email protected] or on his Twitter account, @CurtMWeiler. The Tallahassee Democrat is the only newspaper that covers the Seminoles. Subscribe now to ensure that you never miss a beat

Chiefs under pressure to ditch the tomahawk chop celebration

  • The Kansas City Chiefs are under increasing pressure to quit a popular practice in which fans erupt into a “war cry” while using a chopping hand motion supposed to replicate the Native American tomahawk during pregame ceremonies. The Chiefs are favored to win the Super Bowl this year. The team’s chop tradition and even its name have long been criticized as being derogatory to American Indians
  • However, the national spotlight has long been focused on the Washington football team’s use of the name Redskins as well as the cartoonish Chief Wahoo logo, which has long served as the logo for the Cleveland Indians baseball team. These clubs, however, have elected to drop their Native American-themed nicknames in recent years, while the reigning champion Kansas City Chiefs are gaining greater attention as a result of their second straight participation on the sport’s grandest stage. Several Native American organizations have joined together to put up billboards in the Kansas City region to express their opposition to the tomahawk chop as well as the Chiefs’ name. A protest is scheduled outside Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, the location of Sunday’s game versus the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the group has arranged for an aircraft to fly about the city to raise awareness of the issue. A few thousand individuals have signed two online petitions, one of which was created by a fourth-grader and the other by an adult. The Chiefs made various tweaks to their uniforms for the fall season, including banning headdresses and war paint and making a small adjustment to the chop, with cheerleaders using a closed first instead of an open palm to signify the banging of a drum instead of a closed first. Gaylene Crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian Center, on the other hand, thought the change was ridiculous. In the hopes of aiding the situation, the band continues to play that terrible Hollywood Indian tune, which is such a clichéd Indian song from old Cowboy movies or something like that. I’m not sure how they feel about it, but I don’t think it made any difference “” she explained. “And it’s not like their supporters are any different in their behavior either.” Face paint and headdresses were prohibited from the stadium, according to Chiefs president Mark Donovan, who called it a “significant step.” As he continued, “you are going to have ideas on both sides about what we ought to and ought not to do.” The conversation will continue in the future,” said the president. In the future, we’ll continue to make modifications, and ideally those changes will accomplish what we want them to, which is to respect and celebrate Native American heritage while also honoring the fan experience.” However, the Florida Indigenous Rights and Environmental Equality organization, located in St. Petersburg, says the improvements aren’t nearly enough. The group plans to demonstrate near the stadium on Sunday before the game’s beginning, singing and brandishing placards. Group co-founder Alicia Norris called the chop “very insulting,” adding it “conjures up notions of Native Americans and indigenous people as savages.” Norris also called the chop “racist.” As a result, the team wants to go back and claim that they are being culturally acceptable and respectful of indigenous people by stating that headdresses are not permitted “” she explained. “And it is a good start, but the supporters are still acting as if they are in an indigenous-type environment since you are still referred to as the Chiefs,” says the coach. And you may continue to use this movement that resembles a tomahawk chop, but we’ll refer to it as a drum beat instead for the time being. It’s a little ridiculous. Simply alter the text.” Tomahawk shouting and arm movements were adopted by Chiefs fans long ago, following a tradition that originated at Florida State University in the 1980s and has now spread throughout the NFL. Kile Chaney, a 42-year-old stone mason from Harrisonville, Missouri, described the song as a “rally cry” when the team is struggling. “Just to hear all of the supporters performing the tomahawk chop and hearing it reverberate through the halls, it’s a wonderful noise that we produce here,” said a fan who works in the stadium. Aaron Bien, a 61-year-old Hillsdale, Kansas, automobile repair and body shop owner, described it as “no different from any other cheer.” “It is the soul,” says the author. It is the lifeblood of the organization “Bien, who had been a season ticket member for the Chiefs for 15 years before the epidemic reduced seating space in the stadium this season, expressed his disappointment. In his words, the chop has “absolutely nothing to do with Native Americans.” “It should be noted that the genesis of the Chiefs’ moniker may have more to do with the mayor of Kansas City who was instrumental in luring the team away from Dallas in 1963. Mayor H. Roe Bartle was an imposing figure who was affectionately known as “The Chief” for his many years of service as a leader in the Boy Scouts of America. The Chiefs, according to reports, were given their moniker by club owner Lamar Hunt in honor of Bartle. According to Vincent Schilling, assistant editor of Indian Country Today, this doesn’t make the situation any better at all. He pointed out that, despite the fact that Bartle was white, he founded a Scouting organization called the “Mic-O-Say Tribe,” which is still operating and continues to dress and speak in Native American garb and language. Young participants are referred to as “braves,” while the top leader is referred to as the “chief.” “He was given the title Chief because he dressed up as an Indian and falsely taught Boy Scouts how to dress up as Native Americans,” says the author “Schilling is a member of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe and spoke about his heritage. The games were attended by a large number of people who dressed up as Indians, maintaining a terrible cultural image for decades.” Specifically, he criticized the team’s modifications to the chop, calling them “insulting” and “a ludicrous gesture with a complete lack of cultural responsibility.” Dave Skretta, an Associated Press pro football writer, contributed to this report.
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The Kansas City Chiefs’ “Arrowhead Chop” chant isn’t a tribute to people like me. It’s racist.

Note from the editor, dated February 5, 2021: This essay was initially published before to the 2020 Super Bowl in February of that year. It has been updated to include information on this year’s game. During a Chiefs game, a self-described lifelong Kansas City Chiefs fan approached me and inquired what the lyrics meant that were chanted by the crowd when they performed the “Arrowhead Chop,” the well-known chant that is composed of a sequence of literal ” oh oh oh “s. With disdain and irritation, I told him that they didn’t signify anything.

“It’s nothing,” I said again and again.

The Kansas City Chiefs, an NFL football club based in my hometown, will face the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Super Bowl this year.

Over the course of several years, the public discourse about offensive sports mascots that misrepresent Native American culture has been centered on the Washington Redskins and the Cleveland Indians, with the Kansas City Chiefs remaining largely unnoticed.

As an educator at Haskell Indian Nations University, the only four-year university for federally recognized Native tribes in the United States, I have given numerous presentations on common misconceptions about Native Americans, as well as the harmful stereotypes perpetuated by sports mascots such as the Kansas City Chiefs, among other topics.

  • It’s also becoming physically tiring.
  • A group of Spanish conquistadors assaulted my own people, the Acoma, Haaku, in vengeance for a previous conflict that resulted in the deaths of 12 conquistadors.
  • Men above the age of 25 were stripped of their right foot as a form of punishment.
  • This isn’t the only atrocity that isn’t taught in classrooms very often.
  • It is no coincidence that the football club from San Francisco, the 49ers, is named after this time period in history.
  • In recent years, the campaign for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) has gained momentum; nevertheless, until Savanna Grey Wind was killed and her unborn child was taken from her in North Dakota in 2017, the media had mostly ignored the issue.
  • According to a report by the Urban Indian Health Institute, there were 5,712 reported incidents of missing American Indian and Alaskan Native women in the year 2016.

In addition, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Native Americans are killed in police contacts at a greater rate than any other racial or cultural group in the United States.

The historical traumas that Native Americans have experienced have shown themselves in the loss of our people as well as the loss of our lands and resources.

Nobody has to tell us that the majority of American society is so uninterested in and disdainful of our culture that they chose to do stupid chants while dressed in our attire in order to reduce the entire race to a ridiculous caricature for entertainment purposes.

Native headdresses are rarely seen outside of football games in Kansas City or Washington, Halloween gatherings, and music festivals when the headdresses are prominent.

For example, Native Americans revere the drum, and that drum is never used in the company of alcoholic beverages.

Our cultural traditions of “pumping up” your team are insulting and racist, and we reject them.

He told me about his experience with the tribe.

Roe Bartle, a white man whose Scout title “Chief Lone Bear” was the inspiration for the name of the Kansas City Chiefs football franchise.

The man refused to accept the notion that his dressing up as a Native American constitutes cultural appropriation, claiming instead that the attire and dances “respect” Native Americans by carrying on their traditions.

That is what Native American headdresses represent: Chiefs fought and earned their headdresses, much like military soldiers get medals for their service.

It saddens me that the racist “tomahawk chop” continues to be celebrated in the city where I live and work.

Kansas City, especially its variety, is a favorite of mine.

As part of my mass communication courses, we discuss not just the actual history of Native Americans and the influence of misconceptions, but also how we may correct this situation.

Native people need to be included in wider dialogues as real individuals, rather than only as spectators at sporting events or as a source of entertainment.

It is about learning and appreciating the horrific past our ancestors were exposed to, as well as the practices undertaken by the United States government in order to obliterate our Native identities.

This article is based on remarks published in the Kansas City Star and on the website KansasCity.com. A professor of media communications at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, Rhonda LeValdo has been teaching for more than 20 years.

FSU football: Marching Chiefs offer help to Kansas City Chiefs War Chant

The Florida State Seminoles and the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League have certain commonalities in that both teams have roots to Native American culture. The Chiefs were founded in 1959 and played their inaugural season in 1960, although the Noles had been established for a very long time before that. For the first time, Kansas City had a man called Bob Johnson dressed in a full Native American regalia and galloping around the stadium barebacked on a horse. According to Bobby Bowden, who appeared in the Bowden Dynasty DVD, the Noles actually obtained the nickname from San Diego State.

  • See what it’s supposed to be like for Florida State football fans at Doak Campbell Stadium in the video below!
  • The Kansas City Chiefs won their first trip to the Super Bowl in 50 years with a come-from-behind victory over the Tennessee Titans on Sunday night in Kansas City.
  • Hey, Chiefs, if you need the War Chant done correctly, we’re available and only a few of hours away from where you are.
  • — The Florida State University Marching Chiefs (@FSUChiefs)January 19, 2020

Thoughts

It seemed to me that whomever was in charge of the Marching Chiefs’ Twitter account did an excellent job. It was kind and discreet, but it also made it clear who the professionals in the field of music performance were. It is one of the most exciting moments in all of sports when you are in attendance at a live game, and I am prejudiced in this regard. The sound of the Marching Chiefs playing, which reverberates throughout the stadium, is unlike anything other! In Kansas City, if you’re going to borrow something, make sure you do it correctly or don’t use it at all!

Chiefs face calls to stop ‘tomahawk chop’ chant ahead of Super Bowl LV

As Native American groups increasingly force the Kansas City Chiefs to quit a popular practice in which supporters erupt into a “war cry” while making an imitative of the Native American tomahawk, the Chiefs have responded by increasing their own pressure on the franchise. Several Native American organizations have joined together to put up billboards in the Kansas City region to express their opposition to the tomahawk chop as well as the Chiefs’ name. Meanwhile, a demonstration is planned outside Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, the location of Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the coalition has rented an aircraft to fly about the city in support of the players.

  1. The Atlanta Braves has outlawed a shout that sounds similar to the ‘tomahawk chop,’ however it is unclear whether or not the prohibition would be permanent.
  2. Fans of the Kansas City Chiefs chant and do the chop during the second half of the team’s NFL football game against the Los Angeles Chargers on December 13, 2018 in Kansas City, Missouri On January 17, Not In Our Honor fans demonstrated in opposition to the name of the Kansas City NFL club.
  3. The Chiefs made various tweaks to their uniforms for the fall season, including banning headdresses and war paint and making a small adjustment to the chop, with cheerleaders using a closed first instead of an open palm to signify the banging of a drum instead of a closed first.
  4. ‘They believe that this is beneficial in some way, and they continue to play that terrible Hollywood Indian tune, which is such a clichéd Indian song from old Cowboy movies or something.
  5. Furthermore, their supporters are doing the same thing,’ says the author of the article.

We’ll continue to make modifications in the future, and ideally those changes will accomplish what we intend, which is to respect and celebrate Native American heritage while also honoring the fan experience.’ However, the Florida Indigenous Rights and Environmental Equality organization, located in St.

  1. The group plans to demonstrate near the stadium on Sunday before the game’s beginning, singing and brandishing placards.
  2. Even though you’re still known as the Chiefs, it appears that the supporters are still working under the impression that they’re in an indigenous-type environment.
  3. It’s a little ridiculous.
  4. Tomahawk shouting and arm movements were adopted by Chiefs fans long ago, following a tradition that originated at Florida State University in the 1980s and has now spread throughout the NFL.
  5. Just to hear all of the fans performing the tomahawk chop and hearing it reverberate down the halls, it’s a wonderful sound that we produce here,’ says the narrator.
  6. ‘It is the soul,’ I say.
  7. Mayor H.
  8. The Chiefs, according to reports, were given their moniker by club owner Lamar Hunt in honor of Bartle.
  9. Even though Bartle was white, he founded a Scouting organization called the “Mic-O-Say Tribe,” which is still operating and continues to dress and speak in Native American garb and language.
  10. Regis Mohawk Tribe, ‘he was nicknamed Chief because he dressed up like an Indian and falsely instructed Boy Scouts on how to dress up as Native Americans.’ It was a nasty cultural stereotype that was perpetuated for decades by everyone who dressed up as Indians to attend such games.

To him, the team’s revisions to the chop were both “insulting” and “preposterous,” as well as “demonstrating a complete lack of cultural responsibility.” In a similar vein, in the aftermath of baseball star Hank Aaron’s death, some fans are calling for his former team, the Atlanta Braves, to remove their contentious name in favor of his famed nickname, the Hammer, as a mark of respect.

The National College of American Indians, for example, has advocated for “the removal of race-based mascots, logos, emblems, and stereotypes” for many years now, according to its website.

There was even a nascent internet petition in support of the proposal.

Louis Cardinals on October 9, 2019 at SunTrust Park in Atlanta.

In a tweet sent out more than two years ago, Murphy expressed his affection for the moniker “Hammerin’ Hank,” which he considered “one of the finest nicknames ever.” ‘The ‘Atlanta Hammers?’ you ask.

However, the team took efforts during the 2019 postseason to diminish symbolism of their namesake when St.

Louis Post-Dispatch.

The entire mascot issue isn’t bothering me in any way,’ he went on to say.

We, as Native Americans, are devalued as a result of the misconceptions that exist about us, and we are also utilized as mascots as a result of this mistake.

‘Things like the Washington Redskins and stuff like that.’ ‘That’s the part that’s disheartening,’ he continued. ‘This type of behavior continues to exist. This is simply insulting,’ I believe. A number of allusions to the tomahawk chop were removed from SunTrust Park by the Braves lately.

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