Who Started The We Are Chant

The TRUE Origin of “We Are Penn State”

According to a recent article published by one of Penn State’s student media outlets, Onward State, the origins of the iconic “We Are Penn State” phrase and cheer can be traced back to the actions of the 1947-48 football team, which bravely stood up to racial discrimination and became known as the “Penn State History Lesson.” The narrative is both lovely and uplifting in its own right. A number of media outlets, including Onward State, the Daily Collegian, the Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and others, have covered the topic extensively.

It’s also not true in this case.

In the annals of Penn State history, this is a moment we should all be proud of and celebrate.

The true origin of the term and cheer was revealed for the first time in 1999 by prominent Penn State historian, Lou Prato, in the magazine Town and Gown, which was published in 1999.

Now, it has evolved into an iconic statement for students, alumni, and others, uniting them all in their love of Penn State University.

Prato’s version of events is correct?

  1. Last week, one of Penn State’s student media outlets, Onward State, published a “Penn State History Lesson” in which it was claimed that the origin of the iconic “We Are Penn State” phrase and cheer stemmed from the actions of the 1947-48 football team, which did an admirable job of standing up to racial discrimination. I found the narrative to be both lovely and inspiring to read. Onward State, The Daily Collegian, Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and other publications have all covered the subject extensively. This is something that I think is now included in the Penn State student orientation. Moreover, it is untrue. The football team’s motivating stance is a reality. In the annals of Penn State history, this is a moment we should all be proud of and cherish. However, it was neither the originator of the slogan or the applause that greeted them. For the first time, in 1999, prominent Penn State historian Lou Prato revealed the true origin of the phrase and its accompanying cheer. The newspaper Town and Gown was the first to publish the information. That piece, which has since been reprinted on statecollege.com, describes how the Penn State cheerleaders, who were active in the mid-1970s and early 1980s, came up with the catchphrase. It has now evolved into an iconic statement for students, alumni, and others, uniting them all in their love of Penn State. What proof do you have that Mr. Prato’s version of events is true. There are four significant concerns that must be addressed before accepting the idea that events surrounding the 1947-48 football team were the inspiration for the statement “We Are Penn State.”

Last week, one of Penn State’s student media channels, Onward State, published a “Penn State History Lesson” in which it was stated that the 1947-48 football team’s protests against racial discrimination were the inspiration for the renowned “We Are Penn State” statement and cry. The narrative is both lovely and inspiring. Onward State, The Daily Collegian, Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and other media outlets have all covered the incident extensively. From what I’ve heard, it has become part of Penn State’s orientation program for prospective students.

The football team’s motivating stance is a proven reality.

However, it was not the originator of the term or the cheer.

In that essay, which has since been reprinted on statecollege.com, Prato describes how the Penn State cheerleaders, who were active in the mid-1970s and early 1980s, developed the signature cheer.

What is the evidence that Mr. Prato’s version of events is correct? Those who wish to accept the idea that the circumstances surrounding the 1947-48 football team were the inspiration for the statement “We Are Penn State” must overcome four significant difficulties.

The True Origin Of ‘We Are Penn State’

Last week, one of Penn State’s student media outlets, Onward State, published a “Penn State History Lesson” in which it was claimed that the origin of the iconic “We Are Penn State” phrase and cheer stemmed from the actions of the 1947-48 football team, which did an admirable job of standing up to racial prejudice. The narrative is both lovely and inspiring. The tale has been reprinted several times, including by Onward State, The Daily Collegian, Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and others.

  1. It’s also not correct.
  2. It’s a wonderful moment in Penn State history, and it’s one that we should all celebrate.
  3. The true origin of the term and cheer was revealed for the first time in 1999 by prominent Penn State historian, Lou Prato, in the journal Town and Gown.
  4. Now, it has evolved into an iconic statement for students, alumni, and others, uniting them all in their love for Penn State.
  5. Prato’s version of events is correct?
  1. In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either The Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years? It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad. In a lengthy and thorough history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, they emphasize that they were inspired mostly by observing successful cries in other football stadiums, such as Ohio State and USC. Following the late 1970s/early 1980s, the phrase appears in a number of Collegians articles and other University materials. There is no mention of the 1947-48 football team activities in any of those papers
  2. The first time a connection is drawn between the 1947-48 football team events and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09: This connection has never been made previously. This is the primary source for all subsequent news pieces regarding the connection, including this one. This is the source that Onward State and all other Penn State media outlets use
  3. In reality, Mr. Triplett produced another film for Penn State In Motion in 2006, which was released two years before that video. There is absolutely no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:

To sum up, if you think that the 1947-48 football squad was the inspiration for “We Are Penn State,” you must believe that the slogan “We Are Penn State” was buried for 30 years, concealed from public view, until it was resurrected by the cheerleaders in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Although the cheerleaders resurrected the term, they either failed to convey the connection to the football team or purposefully concealed their connection to the events of 1947-48. This relationship remained secret for another 30 years, until it was unexpectedly found and made public by Penn State athletics marketing in 2013..

  • The events of 1947-1948 took place exactly as recounted, although they did not receive the attention they deserved at the time of the time.
  • Mr.
  • Mr.
  • It’s probable that Penn State sports marketing learns about this and chooses to create their own film showing the link, but without ever doing any investigation to find out where the phrase and cheer originated from in the first place.
  • It was only when Penn State’s sports marketing department publicized Mr.
  • The team’s efforts are deserving of a prominent position in Penn State history.
  • Furthermore, by drawing that connection, we are stealing the heritage of the cheerleaders who were the original creators of the term and cheer.

Recognize and reward the team for their efforts. Recognize the cheerleaders for coming up with the wording and the cheer. Respect the truth by seeking it out at all times, no matter how many misconceptions it dispels.

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Origin of the “We Are…” chant?

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Next up: UConn

Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?LoggedMaigh Eo for Sam


Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?I remember it when I got there in the 80’sLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


I remember it when I got there in the 80’sThey were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.LoggedCalvin:I’m a genius.But I’m a misunderstood genius.Hobbes:What’s misunderstood about you? Calvin:Nobody thinks I’m a genius.


I think at MU it may go back as far as the early 70’s.I remember a poster saying he began the chant.Penn State claims to have originated the chant around 1976.As a kid I somewhat remember the crowd chanting “We Are (clap clap), SC (clap clap)” at USC in the OJ days (68-69)Logged


They were chanting “WE ARE.(clap,clap) MARQUETTE at the first game in the fall of 1971. I had assumed that this was an original MU thing, and had been a long time tradition.Logged


I ALWAYS remember it and I’ve been going to games for 50 years or pretty close.(It’s the one thing I knew how to do when I was 7 or 8!)Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.LoggedLudum habemus.


Somewhat related to this thread: I was at church with my wife and 3-year old son last month and he started chanting “We Are Marquette” during the service. I did very little to stop him resulting in absolute daggers from my better half.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Winner!Logged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sLogged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sBrell played 1969-71, so it might put it early 70`s.Logged


They were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.I do remember the “Warriors Warriors” chant from the 70’s.Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1970 and attended every home game of that glorious season. We chanted it.Logged


As long as I can remember it has been chanted at MU games. I go back to ’68 and it has been there the whole time.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.This is great.LoggedDown 1 w 5 seconds left. Doable.


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Nos Marquette SumisI think I’m close been a long timeLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1971.We were doing it then. DePaul stole it from us.They weren’t doing it until later in the 70’s at a minimum, certainly not at the games I attended there when MU played there while I was a student.They certainly didn’t start it.Logged


Cavemen.PleeeeaaaaaseHumanus IncavoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


showed great proficiency in learning the local languages, especially Huron, but he would always introduce himself with “je suis Marquette,” a phrase that over the years would become ubiquitous in the region.”Je suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).LoggedWow, I’m very concerned for Benny.Being able to mimic Myron Medcalf’s writing so closely implies an oncoming case of dementia.


I was only able to make it to one game last season, but we chanted it then.Logged


suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoBenny is translating to French.Latin would be “Marquette Sumus” according to my Google translator.Logged


Is there a Banner involvedLogged” Love is Space and Time measured by the Heart. “M Proust


Logged


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r/CFB – History Question: ‘We Are ND’ – ‘We Are Penn State’ – which came first?

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“We are Penn State” : A story to help us see in the dark

Richard T. Hughes contributed to this article. All Penn State fans should take a lesson from Peter Shaffer’s award-winning play, “Equus,” in which a psychiatrist advises his patient, “We need a tale to see in the dark.” This is a terrific lesson for all Penn State fans. The Lion Shrine, which is located on the Penn State University campus in State College, Pennsylvania. Penn State is going through a difficult moment right now, but there are certain stories from the school’s history that might help illuminate the road forward.

  1. It is a tale about Penn State football, but it is also a narrative about how the university prioritizes ethical behavior over winning.
  2. It was 1946, and many college football teams in the United States were segregated at the time.
  3. Wally Triplett and Dennie Hoggard were two of the black players on the Penn State squad, which won the Big Ten championship.
  4. Almost two decades later, in 1948, Triplett was the only African-American player on a Penn State team that won the opportunity to face Southern Methodist University in the Cotton Bowl.
  5. As a result of this incident, Lions guard Steve Suhey devised the slogan that would later become the team’s fight cry.
  6. As it turned out, Triplett scored the game-tying touchdown in a game that finished in a tie, 13-13, at the end of the third quarter.
  7. As a graduate of the University of Iowa, I was in attendance at Beaver Stadium as a supporter of the Hawkeyes.
  8. But it wasn’t until I read an article in The Patriot-News in 2009 that I realized what the motto actually meant, and it cemented my admiration for Penn State.
  9. A long and proud legacy of moral and ethical behavior has been established at Penn State, as signified by the phrase “We are Penn State.” In these tough and challenging times, this is a narrative that may assist Penn State — and all who support Penn State — in seeing in the dark.
  10. As for the history to which that affirmation refers, it is a story of the Penn State football team taking an unwavering stand for civil rights when civil rights were all but non-existent in American life.

Messiah College’s Sider Institute for Anabaptist, Pietist, and Wesleyan Studies is directed by Richard T. Hughes, who also serves as its president. Please keep in mind that if you purchase something after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a fee.

Sportscaster reflects on “We are … Marshall” chant

Note from the editor:I just got the following remarks, which were made in response to one of my blog postings regarding the “We Are Marshall!” chant, which is extensively featured in the film. At the time of the plane accident in 1970, there was no such cry to be heard. Despite this, the chant is not entirely fictitious. It is a genuine chant, and I accept my apologies. Craig, Apparently, this isn’t the first time I’ve heard that the “We Are Marshall” rallying cry is a fabrication. To tell the truth, the chant didn’t appear until several years after the disaster.

  1. Then, in 1991, things really started to take off.
  2. Unfortunately, Warner Brothers’ promotion for the film was built on the idea that “This is a genuine story,” which was incorrect.
  3. MarshallUniversity is made up of everyone: you, myself, the 1970 team, the Young Thundering Herd, and the supporters.
  4. However, that moment perfectly depicted the thoughts and sensations felt by Marshall in 1971 when he was told that he should continue to play football and never forget those who had sacrificed their lives.
  5. More and more individuals, both inside and outside of the MU football department, were coming to concur with that line of thinking.
  6. And this was due to the fact that “We are…
  7. Woodrum (Woody Woodrum) Woody Woodrum co-hosts Insider Sportsline, a daily sports talk radio show on WRVC Super Talk 94.1 FM/930 AM in Huntington, West Virginia, which airs on WRVC Super Talk 94.1 FM/930 AM.

FC Cincinnati Chants and Songs — THE PRIDE

Would you want to sing along with The Pride at your next FC Cincinnati match? Our club would welcome you regardless of whether you’ve been a supporter of FC Cincinnati from its inception or whether you’re new to the club. The link to the chant sheet isHEREn, the url is, the width is 854, the height is 480, the providerName is YouTube, the thumbnail URL is, and the resolvedBy is youtube “data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1556729598621 35834″>” data-provider-name=”YouTube”>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1556729598621 35834″

(New!) Hearts on Sleeves

Oh, Federal Communications Commission – Cincinnati Sing We wear our hearts on our sleeves as we serve the Queen. Please lend your voice in service to the Queen. We bleed in the colors orange and blue. If you’re a fan of Cincinnati, join me in singing. Whoa, whoa, whoa-oh, whoa, whoa, whoa-oh. Whoa, whoa, whoa-oh, whoa, whoa, whoa-oh. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Hey! FC Cincinnati Hey-Hey!

Greetings, FC Cincinnati. Hi-Hello-Hello, FC Cincinnati! Hi-Hello-Hello, FC Cincinnati! Hi-Hello-Hello, FC Cincinnati! HEY-HEY Whoa-Whoa-Whoa-Whoa Whoa-Whoa-Whoa-Whoa Whoa-Whoa-Whoa-Whoa Whoa-Whoa-Whoa-Whoa MUCH MORE INFORMATIONn, url:, width:854, height:480, providerName: YouTube, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, width:854, height:480, providerName: YouTube, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1556729598621 291951″>”

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Let’s Go!

Shaa la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la Shaa la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la Shaa la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la Shaa-laaaa-laaaa-laaaa-laaa(^x2) Oh, FCC, awful ole ole ole ole ole ole alligator electric ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole angry ole ole lonesome lonely ole ole ole ole ole Oh, FCC, awful ole ole ole ole ole ole alligator electric ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole angry ole ole lonesome lonely ole ole ole ole ole Oh, FCC, awful ole ole ole ole ole ole alligator electric ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole ole angry ole ole lonesome lonely ole ole ole ole ole Let’s get going, let’s get going!

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Walk-in Song/Match Song (Cincinnati Here We Go)

A shaka, a shaka, a shaka, a shaka A shaka, a shaka, a shaka, a shaka A shaka, a shaka, a shaka, a shaka Shaa-laaaa-laaaa-laaaa-laaa(^x2) I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry FCC, I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m sorry I’m Let’s get this party started!

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Welcome Home

I have roots that grow by the river; they are deeper than the sea; these people and this city; they embrace and anchor me; my roots grow by the river In addition to the arms of the Ohio, Keep me where I want to be, please. When I dial Cincinnati, I get a busy signal. She greets me with a hearty “welcome home.” Welcome home, welcome home, welcome home Oh, Cincinnati, Ohio, how I miss you. When I call Cincinnati and say, “Welcome home,” she responds, “Thank you.” WOWZAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Oh, Cincinnati, Ohio, how I love you.

It is she who answers the phone when I call Cincinnati and say “Welcome home.” ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolved It was created by: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3-17-2_1_1528646954956_20125″>” data-provider-name=”317-2_1_1528646954956_20125″>

The NATI

FC-Cincinnati: AYE, AYE, AYE, AYE, AYE Throughout the soccer field, we’re humming and dancing. One Shot, One Goal, THE NATIn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 309887″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036

Oh FCC

FCCSha la la la la la laOh, FCCSha la la la la la laOh, FCCMORE INFOn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, FCCMORE INFOn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, FCCMORE INFOn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, FCCMORE INFOn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, FCCMORE INFOn, url:, FCCMORE resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 316642″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 316642″>

FCC The Orange and Blue

FC Cincinnati is a professional soccer team based in Cincinnati, Ohio (FC Cincy) They Bailey sings (The Bailey sings)As one for you (As one for you)The Orange and Blue (The Orange and Blue) (As on for you) Ohhhhh, I’m sorry (x4) n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 350280″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 350280″>” data-block

Cincy’s Punchout

Whoa. Oooh, whoa-oh-oh-oh, whoa-oh-oh-oh (x3) Whoaaa. oh-oh-oh. Whoaaa. Whoa-oh F – C – C. Whoa-oh F – C – C. (We’re) from Cincinnati, and you can hear us sing. (We’re) Represent(ing) the 5 – 1 – 3 – F C team. The following are the URLs:, thumbnailURL:, and resolvedBy: YouTube: ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2″ id=”block-yui 1528681979036 358088″> ” data-provider-name=””

FC (clap clap clap) CINCY (clap clap clap)

Whoa. “WHOAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA” (x3) What the f*ck? oh-oh-oh, what the f*ck? Oh my God, F – C – C. Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. HEARS US SINGING FROM CINCINNATI! (We’re) Represent(ing) the 5 – 1 – 3 – F C – Youtube url:, thumbnail URL:,” data-block-type=”32″ id=”b 17 2 1 1528681979036 358088″>” data-provider-name=””> Cin-cyn, url:, thumbnail URL:, resolvedBy: youtube ”

Forza FCC

FC Cincinnati is going to go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, We have the courage of lions in our hearts. We, the Juncta Juvant, have won. Our city’s boundaries are drawn in our hearts rather than being established in stone. Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh, Luh x2 I’m going to say it again: WHOAAAAAAAOOOH, WHOAAAAAAAOOOH Whoaaaaaoohhhhaaaoooohhhh MORE INFORMATIONn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 395818″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 395818″>”

Cincy Till I Die

I’m a Cincinnatian until the day I die (I’m a Cincinnatian until the day I die) I don’t need a reason (I don’t need a reason) to do something. FC Cincinnati, how I miss you (Oh, FC Cincinnati) I’m Orange and Blue for the rest of my life (I’m Orange and Blue for the rest of my life) Allez Allez Allez (Allez Allez Allez)x4MORE INFORMATIONn, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl: n, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl: n, resolvedBy: youtube n, url: n, resolvedBy: youtube n, url: n, resolvedBy: youtube

Whoa Cincinnati

What’s up, Cincinnati? Oh, we adore you. Blue and orange are the primary colors. Let’s raise a glass to the guys of Cincinnati if you’re a fan of the city. Make some FAMILY FRIENDLY noise to let them know you’re here! n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 385941″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 385941″>” data

Hey Cincy

Cincy, how are you? I’m interested in learning more. Please agree to be my lady (or male, depending on how you identify)n, url:, thumbnailUrl: resolvedBy: YouTube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 595111″>” data-provider-name=””>” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 595111″>

Allez Allez Ah Oh

Allez Allez-ah-ohhh Allez-ah-ohhh Allez-ah-ohhh (x2) Everywhere you go, we’ll be right there with youAllez Allez-ah-ohhh (x2) Y’all already know that we’re from Cincinnati, Ohio, and that we’re O-hi-o-n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1528681979036 611949 ” data-provider-name=””>

FCC Terminator

** * ** FC!** * ** Cincy!n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy:

Win Or Lose

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Greatest team Ohio’s Ever Seen

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Oh Cincy You – Tune of Just a Friend

Oh, Cincy, you’ve got everything I’m looking for. It is well known that the FCC is the most effective (x2)n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube n, url:, thumbnailUrl:

In The Nati – Tune of The lion sleeps

Oh, Cincy, you know just what I’m looking for. As far as we’re concerned, FCC is the best (x2)nnnurl:, thumbnailUrl:, resolvedBy: youtube ” data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1551892313482 172658 “>” data-provider-name=”

Reading Rainbow card – tune of reading rainbow

Oh Cincy, you’ve got everything I’m looking for.

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Oh Cincy is so wonderful – Tune of When The Saints

Oh, how lovely Cincinnati is (Oh Cincy is) It’s just fantastic (So wonderful) Oh, Cincinnati is really great. This year’s theme is orange, blue, and The Bailey. Oh, Cincinnati is really great. The image has the following dimensions: n, url:, width:640 pixels and height:480 pixels; the providerName is YouTube; the thumbnail URL is and the resolvedBy is youtube. “data-block-type=”32″ id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1551892313482 640560″> data-block-type=”32” id=”block-yui 3 17 2 1 1551892313482 640560″> YouTube is the data-provider name in this case “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized

We Don’t Mess Around (After a goal)

It is true that we don’t play games (hello!) and that we don’t goof about. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

I believe that we will win! – Wikipedia

” I think that we will win!” is a slogan that is frequently heard at athletic events in the United States. The term originated at the Naval Academy Preparatory School and has since become a tradition among supporters and students of the United States Naval Academy, with other institutions eventually adopting the expression as well. In 2014, the chant garnered national attention as a rallying cry by fans of the United States men’s national soccer team (USMNT) in preparation for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, and it was adopted as the unofficial slogan of the organization known as The American Outlaws.

There is a single cry of “I,” “believe,” followed by “I believe that,” and “I believe that we,” before a chorus of “I believe that we will win!” is repeated many times before the song concludes.

History

During the Army–Navy Game in 2003, the Brigade of Midshipmen raised their voices in support. During the week leading up to the game, the school sold T-shirts with the words “I think that we will win!” printed on them. Jay Rodriguez, a student at the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS), was tasked with creating a chant for his platoon in 1998. He came up with the phrase “I know that we will win!” First used at a NAPS basketball game versus the United States Military Academy Preparatory School in Newport, Rhode Island on December 1, 2003 Corey Strong, a cheerleader for the Navy, learned the song from Rodriguez a year later while he was a Naval Academy student.

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While playing the No.

In preparation for the Army–Navy Game later that year, the Navy marketed T-shirts with the slogan printed on them as part of their marketing campaign.

Fans of the Utah State Aggies men’s basketball team began using the slogan in 2009, and it has now spread to other collegiate sports teams.

It has also been recited by supporters of numerous soccer teams, notably the New York Red Bulls of Major League Soccer and the French team FC Nantes. While the 2016 Ryder Cup was underway, American supporters chanted “USA!” mixed with cries of “I think that we will win!” during the competition.

United States soccer

When the Army-Navy game took place in 2003, the Brigade of Midshipmen raised their voices in support. During the week leading up to the game, the school sold T-shirts with the words “I think that we will win!” printed on the front. The phrase “I think that we will win!” was coined by Jay Rodriguez, a student at the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS), when he was ordered to write a chant for his battalion in 1998. First used at a NAPS basketball game versus the United States Military Academy Preparatory School in Newport, Rhode Island on December 15, 2003 Corey Strong, a cheerleader for the Navy, learned the song from Rodriguez a year later when he was a Naval Academy student.

  1. When the Navy Midshipmen played the No.
  2. For the Army–Navy Game later that year, Navy distributed T-shirts with the slogan printed on them as part of their preparation.
  3. Fans of the Utah State Aggies men’s basketball team began using the cry in 2009, and it has now spread to other collegiate sports teams as well.
  4. Many other soccer teams, like the New York Red Bulls of Major League Soccer and the FC Nantes of France, have also used it as a rallying cry.

San Diego State University trademark

Afterwards, Strong, who had been taught the chant by Rodriguez, was stationed in San Diego, where he went on to get his Master of Business Administration from San Diego State. Aztec Shops Ltd., a clothing company located near San Diego State University, tried to copyright the phrase in 2011. Strong expressed opposition to the trademark, claiming that “everyone would be better served if they discontinued their attempt to trademark the cheer” and that the Naval Academy will be fighting the decision.

Other sports

Afterwards, Strong was stationed in San Diego, where he completed his Master of Business Administration at San Diego State University, which Rodriguez had taught him. The term was tried to be trademarked by Aztec Shops Ltd., a clothing company located near San Diego State University, in 2011. the trademark, noting that “everyone would be better served if they discontinued their attempt to trademark the shout” and that “the Naval Academy will be contesting the trademark” After determining that the trademark had been “widely used over an extended period of time by diverse entities,” the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board denied the application in 2017.

Non-sports usage

Commander Robert E. Clark II led the celebrations at the Naval Academy upon the murder of Osama bin Laden in May 2011. “I think that we have won!” Clark led the midshipmen in a modified version of the chant “I believe that we have won!” For example, during the Occupy Wall Streetmarch in 2011, the cry was used to express solidarity with the protesters. The statement was first used during a demonstration at the Florida state capitol in 2012 by the Florida-based organizationDream Defenders, who adopted it for use in rallies following the 2012 shooting of Trayvon Martin.

To raise awareness of the COVID-19 epidemic, Pitbull created a promotional music titled “I Believe That We Will Win (World Anthem)” (which sampled the slogan “I believe that we will win!

People who have been impacted by the COVID-19 epidemic are encouraged to pick themselves up and rise above the circumstance by listening to the song.

A music video to go along with the song was also published.

See also

  1. “The shouts of the American Outlaws.” The American Outlaws are a band of outlaws from the United States. abBonesteel, Matt (March 24, 2017)
  2. AbBonesteel, Matt (July 1, 2014). “The cry, ‘I believe that we will win,’ originated with Navy football supporters in the United States.” The Washington Post is a newspaper published in Washington, D.C. ab”USNA History and Traditions (Summer 2013)”, which was retrieved on March 24, 2017. Midshipmen in the Navy. The original version of this article was published on June 19, 2017. abStephens, Matt (March 24, 2017)
  3. AbStephens, Matt (July 7, 2014). “‘I feel that we will win’ is a phrase that San Diego State University might trademark.” According to USA Today. Eamonn Brennan, Eamonn Brennan
  4. Retrieved on March 24, 2017
  5. (November 17, 2011). “The Navy was the birthplace of the coolest chant in the country.” Bedoya joins the Nantes fans in the chant of “I think that we will win!” according to ESPN. Retrieved on March 24, 2017. Sports Illustrated is a magazine dedicated to sports. The 9th of May, 2016. Williams, Roddy, et al., eds., retrieved on March 24, 2017
  6. (September 30, 2016). “The Ryder Cup has officially begun on the first tee.” Jeff Eisenberg’s article about the Ryder Cup was published on March 24, 2017. (June 19, 2014). “The incredible story of how the most popular sports shout in the world got its start.” Yahoo! Sports is a popular sports website. Hall, Matthew (March 24, 2017)
  7. Retrieved March 24, 2017. (July 7, 2014). It is possible for SDSU to trademark the phrase “I think that we will win!” The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper in San Diego. Landon Donovan leads the chant “I think that we will win” before the World Cup final, which was retrieved on March 24, 2017. According to Sports Illustrated, on July 5, 2015, the United States Women’s National Team led the audience in the “I think we just won” shout. Sports Illustrated is a magazine dedicated to sports. July 7, 2015
  8. Retrieved March 24, 2017
  9. Ab” “I am certain that we will be successful in our trademark application.” Retrieved on March 24, 2017 from KFMB-TV. Donahue, Bill (July 10, 2014). (January 31, 2017). “The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board will not register the chant “I Believe” as a trademark.” Law360. Rubio, Tena (March 24, 2017)
  10. (September 22, 2017). “Get to Know the Heartbeat of the Oakland Athletics.” KQED. The original version of this article was published on December 7, 2019. Hickey, John (December 15, 2019)
  11. Retrieved on December 15, 2019. (July 21, 2014). “Stephen Vogt has quickly established himself as a fan favorite with the Oakland A’s.” The Mercury News is a daily newspaper in San Jose, California. The original version of this article was published on December 5, 2019. Josh Planos’s article from December 16, 2019 was retrieved (July 19, 2018). “I am certain that we will win… at golf.” FiveThirtyEight. Davis, Noah (July 19, 2018)
  12. RetrievedJuly 19, 2018
  13. (May 2, 2011). “Osama Bin Laden’s death sparks a riot among US Naval Academy students,” according to the article. Business Insider is a publication that covers the business world. Alvarez, Lisette (March 24, 2017)
  14. Retrieved March 24, 2017. (August 11, 2013). Sit-in in opposition to “Stand Your Ground” in Florida. The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City. February 5, 2020
  15. Retrieved February 5, 2020
  16. Aaron Morrison’s formal name is Morrison (January 20, 2016). “With an anti-Trump disruptive rally, Black Lives Matter marks the beginning of four years of resistance.” Mic. Obtainable on February 9, 2020
  17. “Pitbull Delivers a Message of Hope in a New Coronavirus Jam,” Charu Sinha writes in the New York Times. Mashable. Retrieved2020-03-28

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