Who Started We Are Chant

The TRUE Origin of “We Are Penn State”

During that time period, Kapur’s position as a reader of English literature at Miranda House, Delhi University, required her to engage with a large number of young ladies, many of whom were around the same age as her daughter. As a result of these encounters, she began to feel anxious. Throughout her body, she felt an eerie emptiness that threatened to consume her entire being. The idea of participating in Buddhist chanting was initially met with resistance by her buddy. The companion, on the other hand, was tenacious.

It would take us five to ten minutes to chant.

Buddhist monk Nichiren Daishonin thought that the Lotus Sutra, an important scripture in Mahayana Buddhism, was one of Gautama Buddha’s most significant teachings, and that it contained the path to happiness.

In English, it translates as “devotion to the mystic law of the lotus blossom sutra.” As Kapur explains, “I stopped feeling like a victim as soon as I realized it was my own fault.” In their religious philosophy, Hindus are familiar with the concept of causality, which is one of the reasons Bharat Soka Gakkai (BSG), as the Indian chapter is known, has seen such rapid growth.

  • Other religious practices can be accommodated because it is not very difficult to follow.
  • In the end, we don’t care about the media attention we receive.
  • People choose to join or leave organizations.
  • It gained popularity in metropolitan India throughout the first decade of the 2000s.
  • Weekend attendance was encouraged by harried professionals.
  • A targeted approach and word-of-mouth marketing have also helped the group grow its reach.
  • Several BSG practitioners become involved because they are experiencing some kind of personal difficulty.

Purohit’s sister was going through a difficult time when she received an approach from a member of the BSG, according to Abhinav Purohit, a telecom strategy consultant working in Dubai.

A member introduced Rupkatha Bhowmick to BSG when her father was entangled in legal proceedings in Dubai.

Dham, whose sister and daughter are also practitioners, had been a supporter of the concept rather than an active participant up until that point.

As Ghosh describes it, “She was hallucinating and insane.” It was her paternal aunts who encouraged her to begin chanting because they were Nichiren Buddhists.

Her confidence in the practice was strengthened as a result of these two developments..

” While the technique itself isn’t mystical, I feel it is.” Ghosh has worked with the organization in a variety of positions, including as the division’s head for young females (YWD).

We urge married ladies to participate in the women’s section of the organization (WD).

“My son was in a coma for more than two months.

“The Sensei” (referring to Daisaku Ikeda, the 90-year-old founder president of Soka Gakkai International, or SGI) claims that the philosophy transforms poison into medicine via trust in the concept.

“Most of my son’s injuries have healed entirely.

In addition to her mother, the 56-year-old inhabitant of Sikandrabad claims that her family shouted for three other patients at the hospital who were in a similar condition.

His religious beliefs lead him to attend temples, and his religious practices lead him to follow Buddhism under the guidance of the Soka Gakkai organization.

“We are not actively searching for the stray dog with a wound,” she adds.

Despite the fact that “we don’t intentionally search for individuals in distress,” she admits that the majority of people who join BSG do so when they are at their lowest points, both physically and mentally.

Worlds on opposite sides A certified non-governmental organization (NGO), the Indian branch was founded in 1986 and has grown from 4,000 members in 1997 to 150,000 members now.

As of right now, Mehta estimates that the organization has somewhat less than 200,000 members, though she is unsure of the precise number.

A larger-than-life character, Ikeda is credited with bringing this religious system to the entire world.

Celebrities like as actress Tisca Chopra and fashion designer Rina Dhaka have embraced the trend in recent months.

Senior members of the organization have expressed concern over members who have political ties.

Neither the organization nor its members wish to be connected with any political ideologies.

In the end, we don’t care about the media attention we receive.

People choose to join or leave organizations.” The movement, on the other hand, has a consciously metropolitan feel.

Because the holy material has not been translated into Indian languages, the ability to read and write English is a pre-requisite.

In her words, “I’ve written to them several times, asking why Bengali cannot be utilized as an alternate language in Kolkata, but to no effect.” Dham, who introduced her chauffeur Suraj to chanting, concedes that he may be unable to attend BSG meetings due to a lack of understanding of spoken and written English, despite the fact that he has gained much from the concept.

  1. Regional language translation will require clearance from SGI and is unlikely to occur unless there is a significant demand for it.
  2. As Ghosh points out, “I’ve seen individuals bring up this problem at meetings multiple times, only to be informed that if English is removed as a communication medium, the membership numbers would soar above BSG’s ability to handle them, and ‘we don’t want that’,” he adds.
  3. It’s possible that India is the only country with this problem.
  4. Outside of Japan, Ikeda’s writings have been published in as many as 1,000 different language editions.
  5. Also recently released was a German translation of the first book of Nichiren Daishonin’s works.
  6. The founder of BSG, Purohit, argues that evangelism is not part of the group’s culture.

‘My wife does not practice Nichiren Buddhism, and I’ve never felt the need to ask her to do so; I believe that it should be something that comes from the heart.’ The fact that you have attracted this many members is not a need, according to Bhowmick, but it is considered a significant accomplishment.

The number of members is important to certain individuals, but leadership positions are not based on this, according to him.

Members of the committee who claim that Mehta is correct also claim that such a restriction does not exist in the present day.

According to Bhowmick, “during the years that I was extremely active, mostly between 2009 and 2012, I didn’t see any Muslim members in my district in Kolkata (in the Ballygunge region) or in Chittaranjan Park in Delhi (where she stayed for a while),” According to Ghosh, I didn’t come across any Muslim or Sikh members throughout my years in Kolkata, she claims.

  • In addition, the group did not reply to inquiries on the number of members or the breakdown of members by gender.
  • It is quickly pointed out, however, by members, that it is not a replacement for actual assistance.
  • ” It was recognised by doctors as well as by the public.
  • They can introduce biases and misinterpretations into a situation at any point.
  • In Mehta’s opinion, the member who made the statement “has no grasp of what BSG stands for.” The medical community cannot be replaced by us, so we must refrain from doing so.” Rather of imposing our solutions on others, we just urge them to look inside.
  • Despite the fact that Bhowmick admires the idea, he dislikes the organization, and he no longer attends meeting.
  • “It was incorrect and caused some consternation,” Ghosh admits.

The fact that she had regular meetings at home and that leaders dropped by unexpectedly to check on her was not an issue for her in-laws, she adds.

It has been entrusted to BSG leaders to ensure the well-being of the members under their supervision.

The situation has improved for many people.

Members communicated in hushed tones with distressed people they encountered through Facebook groups, friends, and family members.

In the words of BSG public relations manager Sumita Mehta, “women are more receptive and welcoming” of new ideas, which might explain why.

A comfortable environment for women to talk about their personal problems is provided via home sessions.

Anything discussed in such meetings is not meant to be shared with anybody outside of the circle.

Indrani Ghosh, an IT worker, adds that relationships between members are not encouraged, however there have been cases of members meeting and falling in love during chanting sessions, according to Indrani.

[email protected] To get our newsletters, please provide a valid email address. Thank you for your interest in our newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest news. With Mint, you can stay connected and up to date. Click here to get our app.

  1. In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either The Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years? It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad. In a lengthy and thorough history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, they emphasize that they were inspired mostly by observing successful cries in other football stadiums, such as Ohio State and USC. Following the late 1970s/early 1980s, the phrase appears in a number of Collegians articles and other University materials. There is no mention of the 1947-48 football team activities in any of those records
  2. The first time a connection is drawn between the 1947-48 football team events and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09. This connection has never been made previously. This is the primary source for all subsequent news pieces regarding the connection, including this one. This is the source that Onward State and all other Penn State media outlets use
  3. In reality, Mr. Triplett produced another film for Penn State In Motion in 2006, which was released two years before that video. There is absolutely no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:

In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either the Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years; It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad.

See also:  Limelights Why Dont We Fandom Chant

They provide a thorough and extensive history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, based mostly on their observations of effective cries at other stadiums, like as Ohio State and USC, to inspire their efforts.

There is no mention of the 1947-48 football team activities in any of those papers; the first time a connection is drawn between the 1947-48 football team events and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09: A previous mention of this link did not include the phrase Thereafter, all articles concerning the link will be based on this first report.

According to Onward State and all other Penn State media sources, Mr.

There is no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:;

The True Origin Of ‘We Are Penn State’

Dennis Shea contributed to this article. Onward State published a “Penn State History Lesson” earlier this month, claiming that the acts of the 1947-48 football team, who bravely stood up to racial discrimination, were the inspiration for the renowned “We Are Penn State” statement and cry. The narrative is both lovely and uplifting in its own right. A number of media outlets, including Onward State, the Daily Collegian, the Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and others, have covered the topic extensively.

  1. It’s also not true in this case.
  2. In the annals of Penn State history, this is a moment we should all be proud of and celebrate.
  3. The true origin of the term and cheer was revealed for the first time in 1999 by prominent Penn State historian, Lou Prato, in the magazine Town and Gown, which was published in 1999.
  4. Now, it has evolved into an iconic statement for students, alumni, and others, uniting them all in their love of Penn State University.

What is the proof that Mr. Prato’s version of events is correct? Those who wish to accept the argument that the events surrounding the 1947-48 football team were the inspiration for the term “We Are Penn State” must first overcome four fundamental challenges in their thinking.

  1. In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either The Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years? It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad. In a lengthy and thorough history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, they emphasize that they were inspired mostly by observing successful cries in other football stadiums, such as Ohio State and USC. Following the late 1970s/early 1980s, the phrase appears in a number of Collegians articles and other University materials. There is no mention of the 1947-48 football team activities in any of those papers
  2. The first time a connection is drawn between the 1947-48 football team events and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09: This connection has never been made previously. This is the primary source for all subsequent news pieces regarding the connection, including this one. This is the source that Onward State and all other Penn State media outlets use
  3. In reality, Mr. Triplett produced another film for Penn State In Motion in 2006, which was released two years before that video. There is absolutely no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:

In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either the Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years; It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad.

They provide a thorough and extensive history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, based mostly on their observations of effective cries at other stadiums, like as Ohio State and USC, to inspire their efforts.

There is no mention of the events of 1947-48 in any of those records; the first time a connection is established between the events of the 1947-48 football team and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09, which states: A previous mention of this link did not include the phrase Thereafter, all articles concerning the link will be based on this first report.

According to Onward State and all other Penn State media sources, Mr.

There is no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:;

Community Content

Onward State is not responsible for the content contributed by members of the community who are not associated with the company. The opinions stated may not always represent those of our company’s management. To have your work published on Onward State, please visit this page.

Origin of the “We Are…” chant?

The only thing necessary for thisFREEregistration is a valid e-mail address, and that is the only thing. Every piece of information you provide is kept strictly secret, and we will never share or sell it to anyone else. Login to get rid of this box (and its advertisements), or signup RIGHT NOW.

Next up: UConn

Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?LoggedMaigh Eo for Sam


Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?I remember it when I got there in the 80’sLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


I remember it when I got there in the 80’sThey were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.LoggedCalvin:I’m a genius.But I’m a misunderstood genius.Hobbes:What’s misunderstood about you? Calvin:Nobody thinks I’m a genius.


I think at MU it may go back as far as the early 70’s.I remember a poster saying he began the chant.Penn State claims to have originated the chant around 1976.As a kid I somewhat remember the crowd chanting “We Are (clap clap), SC (clap clap)” at USC in the OJ days (68-69)Logged


They were chanting “WE ARE.(clap,clap) MARQUETTE at the first game in the fall of 1971. I had assumed that this was an original MU thing, and had been a long time tradition.Logged


I ALWAYS remember it and I’ve been going to games for 50 years or pretty close.(It’s the one thing I knew how to do when I was 7 or 8!)Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.LoggedLudum habemus.


Somewhat related to this thread: I was at church with my wife and 3-year old son last month and he started chanting “We Are Marquette” during the service. I did very little to stop him resulting in absolute daggers from my better half.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Winner!Logged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sLogged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sBrell played 1969-71, so it might put it early 70`s.Logged


They were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.I do remember the “Warriors Warriors” chant from the 70’s.Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1970 and attended every home game of that glorious season. We chanted it.Logged


As long as I can remember it has been chanted at MU games. I go back to ’68 and it has been there the whole time.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.This is great.LoggedDown 1 w 5 seconds left. Doable.


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Nos Marquette SumisI think I’m close been a long timeLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1971.We were doing it then. DePaul stole it from us.They weren’t doing it until later in the 70’s at a minimum, certainly not at the games I attended there when MU played there while I was a student.They certainly didn’t start it.Logged


Cavemen.PleeeeaaaaaseHumanus IncavoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


showed great proficiency in learning the local languages, especially Huron, but he would always introduce himself with “je suis Marquette,” a phrase that over the years would become ubiquitous in the region.”Je suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).LoggedWow, I’m very concerned for Benny.Being able to mimic Myron Medcalf’s writing so closely implies an oncoming case of dementia.


I was only able to make it to one game last season, but we chanted it then.Logged


suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoBenny is translating to French.Latin would be “Marquette Sumus” according to my Google translator.Logged


Is there a Banner involvedLogged” Love is Space and Time measured by the Heart. “M Proust


Logged


See also:  What Do They Chant In Peru In A Protest

“We are Penn State” : A story to help us see in the dark

Richard T. Hughes contributed to this article. All Penn State fans should take a lesson from Peter Shaffer’s award-winning play, “Equus,” in which a psychiatrist advises his patient, “We need a tale to see in the dark.” This is a terrific lesson for all Penn State fans. The Lion Shrine, which is located on the Penn State University campus in State College, Pennsylvania. Penn State is going through a difficult moment right now, but there are certain stories from the school’s history that might help illuminate the road forward.

  • It is a tale about Penn State football, but it is also a narrative about how the university prioritizes ethical behavior over winning.
  • It was 1946, and many college football teams in the United States were segregated at the time.
  • Wally Triplett and Dennie Hoggard were two of the black players on the Penn State squad, which won the Big Ten championship.
  • Almost two decades later, in 1948, Triplett was the only African-American player on a Penn State team that won the opportunity to face Southern Methodist University in the Cotton Bowl.
  • As a result of this incident, Lions guard Steve Suhey devised the slogan that would later become the team’s fight cry.
  • As it turned out, Triplett scored the game-tying touchdown in a game that finished in a tie, 13-13, at the end of the third quarter.
  • As a graduate of the University of Iowa, I was in attendance at Beaver Stadium as a supporter of the Hawkeyes.
  • But it wasn’t until I read an article in The Patriot-News in 2009 that I realized what the motto actually meant, and it cemented my admiration for Penn State.
  • A long and proud legacy of moral and ethical behavior has been established at Penn State, as signified by the phrase “We are Penn State.” In these tough and challenging times, this is a narrative that may assist Penn State — and all who support Penn State — in seeing in the dark.
  • As for the history to which that affirmation refers, it is a story of the Penn State football team taking an unwavering stand for civil rights when civil rights were all but non-existent in American life.

Messiah College’s Sider Institute for Anabaptist, Pietist, and Wesleyan Studies is directed by Richard T. Hughes, who also serves as its president. Please keep in mind that if you purchase something after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a fee.

Sportscaster reflects on “We are … Marshall” chant

Note from the editor:I just got the following remarks, which were made in response to one of my blog postings regarding the “We Are Marshall!” chant, which is extensively featured in the film. At the time of the plane accident in 1970, there was no such cry to be heard. Despite this, the chant is not entirely fictitious. It is a genuine chant, and I accept my apologies. Craig, Apparently, this isn’t the first time I’ve heard that the “We Are Marshall” rallying cry is a fabrication. To tell the truth, the chant didn’t appear until several years after the disaster.

  • Then, in 1991, things really started to take off.
  • Unfortunately, Warner Brothers’ promotion for the film was built on the idea that “This is a genuine story,” which was incorrect.
  • MarshallUniversity is made up of everyone: you, myself, the 1970 team, the Young Thundering Herd, and the supporters.
  • However, that moment perfectly depicted the thoughts and sensations felt by Marshall in 1971 when he was told that he should continue to play football and never forget those who had sacrificed their lives.
  • More and more individuals, both inside and outside of the MU football department, were coming to concur with that line of thinking.
  • And this was due to the fact that “We are…
  • Woodrum (Woody Woodrum) Woody Woodrum co-hosts Insider Sportsline, a daily sports talk radio show on WRVC Super Talk 94.1 FM/930 AM in Huntington, West Virginia, which airs on WRVC Super Talk 94.1 FM/930 AM.

Power Your Soccer Supporters Group

Construct a Community Talking Shop. Send in your photographs. Learn the chants by heart. Raise money for a charitable organization or a community partner. Give away an autographed kit from your10 for a good cause. When it comes to networking, Chant is your private platform where members may interact regardless of where they sit at the table. ​​

BENEFITS

Streams of conversation. There are two types of channels: public and private. Messages sent directly to the recipient. Everything in one convenient location. In a worldwide network, you may communicate with other fans groups for your team and league.

A network of supporters and group leaders is formed through the use of dedicated leader chatstreams. Observations gleaned from match statistics, group projections, and poll results are automatically placed in the Chat Stream to stimulate conversation.

Giveaways

There will be no more rushing around the tavern enticing people to come in. Chant streamlines the procedure and makes it enjoyable.

Photos It’s a party afterall

There will be no more racing around the pub enticing people to come in! Chant streamlines the procedure while also making it enjoyable to participate in it.

Your Chants

Lyrics for a chant Instructions. Exemplifications via video. Is it difficult to hear? With real-time chant notifications, your capo can ensure that everyone is shouting in sync.

It’s matchday. ¡Vamos!

Tickets for sale to other members may be posted by members themselves – no more searching through ticket forums or paying scalpers! Leaders are used to sell away game, bus, tailgate, and special event tickets, all of which may be barcoded and include a built-in scanner.

VAR Polls Debate the call

Are you perplexed by yet another enigmatic phone call? With five pre-programmed VAR Polls, you may vote and argue the call in real time.

Match Predictions

Share your forecast and see how it stacks up against the predictions of other supporters groups. Run an automated prediction giveaway in which correct score guesses are registered for a chance to win cash prizes.

Match Stats Follow the action

While you’re making your prediction, look at the stats from the previous meeting. Keep track of metrics throughout the contest, which will be displayed in the home stream.

100 moving parts. 1 tool.

Publicize breaking news and upcoming events. Keep track of member participation and assign permissions. Group tickets should be posted, and payments should be tracked. Maintain control over chants. Membership cards should be printed. Everything is contained inside a single online dashboard.

Event Management Watch parties. Tailgates. Travel. Volunteering.

Make a plan for the event. Make sure the message gets out. Member participation may be tracked and rewarded.

Polls

Take a poll of your members and start a debate. With Chant Assist, the results of polls are immediately reported in the conversation stream.

Notifications A game changer

Participate in a survey to create debate among your group members When using Chant Assist, the results of polls are immediately reported in the conversation stream.

A global fan of the beautiful game?All your supporters groupsin one place.

Join by entering the code supplied by the leader of your supporters group. I’m a paragraph of text. Click here to add your own content and make changes to what I’ve written. It’s a simple process.

Your Group Logo. Your Club Colors. Your Private Community.

Is Facebook only used by 50% of the population? Is it true that 80 percent of emails get unread?

Work hard to build momentum only to lose members in the off season?

Spending your watch party collecting dues, selling scarves, and updating spreadsheets is not a good idea.

Amplify your Capo! (We’re sure they won’t mind.)

Thomas Kelly, Morton B. Knafel Professor of Music, talks about his experiences studying and teaching chant using the Houghton resources in this episode of Houghton75. Specifically, we look at the music of Ambrosian chant, which is the sole competing tradition to Gregorian chant that has survived to the present day in the metropolitan region of Milan, Italy. Ambrosian chants performed by Antifonale Ambrosiano (LIM, Lucca), conducted by Giovanni Scomparin, as background music Transcript of the podcast as well as musical notes Alex Csiszar: Houghton is a truly fantastic place to live and work.

  • Stephen Greenblatt: I’d want to thank you for your time.
  • Stephanie Sandler (interviewer): In addition, it’s very awesome.
  • Hello and welcome to Houghton75.
  • Hannah Ferello (HF): I’m Hannah Ferello, and I’m a writer.
  • JC: The Houghton Library at Harvard University first opened its doors in 1942.
  • A rare peek into some of Houghton’s most valued possessions and the manner in which they inspire academics and students is provided through this podcast, which is only one of several opportunities to engage in our year-long schedule of activities.
  • JC: As soon as we hear the phrase “chant music,” our minds immediately jump to the monastic musical style linked with Saint Gregory, Gregorian chant.

Ambrosian chant is the only one of these early traditions that has survived.

Thomas Kelly, Morton B.

But, first and foremost, what exactly is Ambrosian chant?

Now, Ambrosian chant is similar to Gregorian chant, and perhaps other types of chant as well, in that it is performed one note at a time, like Gregorian chant.

And it’s in Latin, and the most of the passages are taken from the Bible, so they’re all the same in that respect.

“No, we have our music that derives from the great Saint Ambrose, and you have your music that descends from the great Saint Gregory,” they remarked in Milan and the surrounding area.

See also:  Which Of The Following Terms Characterize The Texture Of Gregorian Chant

Thank you so much for your assistance.

As a result, all of the manuscripts that include this music are from that region.

A manuscript of Ambrosian chant, one of the three manuscripts on display, was previously researched by Professor Kelly and his students in a previous seminar.

TK: Our third manuscript has been in the collection for quite some time, and it was recently displayed at the Houghton Library as part of a special exhibition.

The majority of Ambrosian chant manuscripts are substantially longer than 20 folios in length.

We discovered this after traveling to Milan and inspecting all of the microfilms to see whether any of the others have a distinguishing characteristic similar to this one.

However, according to one researcher, the only other manuscript that has this is a text that appears to be a Benedictine manuscript but contains Ambrosian chant instead.

The Gallarate manuscript and this manuscript are essentially two different versions of the same document.

What method did you use to extract them from the manuscript?

The gorgeous initial of Mauritius was placed on the front of the card as well.

A bookstore, on the other hand, who is eager to earn money would presumably put his or her best foot forward by placing the most exquisite miniature at the head of the stack of leaves he or she already has assembled.

JC: Chanting was formerly an oral custom, according to historians.

Eventually, though, the chants were documented in writing.

Whether or not the motivations for recording Ambrosian chant were different from those for recording Gregorian chant is debatable.

It is believed that the earliest written down version of Gregorian chant was created somewhere in the 9th century, and that the first complete volumes of it were created sometime in the 10th century.

Prior to that, there are books with words in them.

All of the earliest Gregorian chant sources that we have are not from Rome, which is surprising given that the chant is claimed to have originated in Rome and that Saint Gregory the Great is associated with it.

And Charlemagne is the one who said to himself, “Hmm, I’ve got this huge polyglot realm here.” They’re all barbarians in their own right.

We’re going to develop a new type of writing that people will refer to as “after my name” once I pass away.

Monasteries will be built in our area.

“From now on, we’re all going to be singing the Roman chant,” he declares.

Consequently, it’s possible that the motivation for writing down whatever this music was, whether it truly originated in Rome or not, was to propagate it and teach it to individuals who were unfamiliar with it.

I’m not sure why the Ambrosians decided to start writing down their music.

This is a really fascinating topic – why do you feel the need to write something down one day and the following day you do not feel the need to write it down the next day.

That is something I seriously doubt.

Do you think it’s because there’s so much Gregorian chant around us that we want to appear authoritative and important, and we want to make sure that things don’t change for the worse?

Consequently, Ambrosian chant has a far longer time of oral transmission than Gregorian chant, which is particularly noteworthy since the wiggly, decorative sound of Ambrosian chant almost sounds like someone is making it up as he goes along, which is quite interesting.

However, we may be able to learn something about how music changes in oral transmission if we conduct enough research since we have one type of music that ceases being transmitted orally in the 9th century and another type that stops being transmitted orally in the 12th century.

What does the notation for Medieval chants look like in relation to contemporary music?

You make a succession of lines on the page.

A dry point line is a line that is not wet.

We presently use a G-clef and an F-clef, but in the past, they used F-clefs and C-clefs, as well as other clefs on occasion.

They seldom utilized more than three lines, and occasionally only four.

When you stop to think about it, three lines equals seven notes, beginning below the bottom line and ending above the top line.

Rather than going up higher, they tend to modify the clef and just lower the whole thing down since there isn’t enough space up above to go very high because the words of the line are up above that point.

In addition, it keeps parchment in good condition.

JC: The binding of Gregorian and Ambrosian chant manuscripts into volumes differs despite the fact that the methods of notation are the same in both.

However, for one year’s worth of music, they both utilize two volumes.

Music for the Mass and music for the Office, which are the eight times a day when monks or clergy in cathedrals and college churches attend to church and pray, are available.

It would be impossible to accomplish if you tried to compile all of the music for the Mass and the Office into a single book.

Consequently, you must decide what you will do in this situation.

The reason for this is beyond me.

As a result, they divide the money in half.

They write all of the music for the Masses and Offices in chronological order from the beginning of the year until the Easter Vigil.

As a result, the Ambrosian manuscripts are divided into two parts: the winter portion of the year and the summer portion of the year, as the term goes in the industry.

As a result, their year was divided between two churches, and their liturgy was divided between two books.

Professor Kelly believes that the ability of Houghton Library’s unique items to spark and support student research is one of the most valuable aspects of the collection, and that this connection between the collection and Harvard’s institutional mission is one of the most important aspects of the collection.

  1. Teaching and research are two important aspects of my job.
  2. “Well, I’m not familiar with this Medieval music,” a large number of people say when they see the genuine thing in person for the first time.
  3. And all of a sudden, it comes to life and becomes real, and these are actual fellow human beings with whom you are on the verge of coming into physical touch.
  4. HF: We’d like to express our gratitude to Professor Thomas Kelly for joining us and sharing his thoughts on Ambrosian chant as well as the importance of the library at the University.
  5. JC: Throughout the episode, you’ve heard instances of Ambrosian chant sung by members of the Cappella musicale di Sant’Ambrogio, directed by Giovanni Scomparin, as well as other musical performances.
  6. We would like to express our gratitude to Director Scomparin and Professor Kelly for granting us access to these recordings.
  7. JC: If you are in the Boston area, you may also stop by the library and ask to see this manuscript or other materials from the collection in our reading room, if you are interested.

To get audio transcripts and extensive music notes, please go to houghton75.org/podcast. HF: Please accept our sincere thanks for visiting us today, and we hope to see you again next time for another edition of Houghton75.

Auburn football fans react to Penn State’s ‘we want Auburn’ chant

Following a strong 44-13 victory against Ball State, Penn State supporters provided content for the Auburn football bulletin board by chanting ‘we want Auburn’ after the game. Prior to their Week Three meeting against the Tigers, the Nittany Lions feasted on the defending Mid-American Conference champions, who had outscored their first two opponents by a combined 122-10. Auburn football had just defeated FCS opponent Alabama State 62-0 earlier in the day when the Beaver Stadium fans began chanting for the current 25th-ranked squad to come out and play.

  1. Let’s get this party started…
  2. Auburn is on the way!
  3. Chris Hough (@Auburntigers86) is a Twitter user who follows the Auburn Tigers.
  4. Rent Is Provided For Free Madison Riggins (@mqriggins) is a social media influencer.
  5. Can’t.
  6. Wait.
  7. Tigers Three (@TigersThree) is a Twitter account for the Tigers.

Saying “We Want Auburn” five times is the same as saying “Candyman” five times.

September 12, 2021, CP3 (@ ChrisP9009), Twitter Oh, my God.

Bo Nix has made tremendous strides since joining this new offense.

He’s having a good time.

Auburn Tweeter (@Auburn Tweeter) will be on the air on September 12, 2021.

According to the latest predictions, Auburn football will drop into the low 20s following defeats to Texas and Utah.

It cannot be stressed that the outcome of this game might very well affect the course of the team’s season.

If they manage to pull off the W?

Homeschool Football Team

The Chargers are a competitive 6-man football program for home-schooled adolescents that competes at the high school and junior high school levels. Throughout McKinney, we serve families in the greater Dallas metropolitan region, encompassing Collin, Denton, and Dallas counties, among other places. It is our mission to develop champions while simultaneously pursuing championships.

2021 CHANT CHARGERS CHEERLEADERS

Open to any homeschooled females between the ages of 11 and 18. The registration period for the Charger Cheer season in 2021 has concluded. Come visit us at our games, or better yet, come join us in 2022 for an exciting season of sideline cheering as we support the Chargers in their quest for a championship! When the San Diego Chargers play football, Charger Cheer raise their spirits by displaying their talents through cheering, chanting, level one stunts/pyramids, sideline dances, and even entire halftime shows!

In the meanwhile, our squad will not be participating in any cheer competitions.

As a result, we instill discipline in all we do.

The fruit of righteousness and peace is produced later on, however, for those who have been trained by it.” THE ACCOMPLISHMENT OF HEBREWS 12:11-12 In order to keep our junior high and high school football teams competitive, we play a tough schedule.

Philippians 4:3TEAM VALUES The good battle has been won, and the course has been completed; I have maintained the faith.” 2 Timothy 4:7 (NIV) ​

SPONSORS

Collaborations that are fruitful both on and off the field

2021 CHANT CHEER SQUAD INFORMATION

ResponsibilitiesExpectations

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *