Who Wrote Kyrie Eleison Greek Chant Music

The Origin of the Kyrie

Beginning with its Judaic beginnings and progressing through the development of Gregorian chant to the Latin Mass, the origins of the first church music may be traced back to the beginning of time. This is the source of our beloved Kyrie text, which has been adapted to music by a plethora of composers, including Hildegard von Bingen, William Byrd, and Franz Schubert, among others (and many more!) Kyrie eléison(, v) is a Greek phrase that means “Kyrie eléison.” Lord, please have compassion on me.

Historically, the origins of church music may be traced back to the early Christians and their roots in ancient Jewish ritual music.

The Psalms are said to be accompanied by plucked stringed instruments, with trumpets playing during breaks, according to the texts of the Jewish Talmud (Selah).

Text was usually sung on a single note, with minimal melodic alterations to correspond with the grammatical text, most commonly antiphonally, by Jewish Cantors.

Despite the fact that the customs of the synagogue were not documented by modern standards, it is widely thought that they were incorporated into Christian worship.

Despite the fact that antiphonal singing may have originated among Christians who lived in close geographical proximity to the Jewish foundations of Christianity, by the end of the 4th century, similar kinds of liturgical singing were popular in both Eastern Byzantium (Greek) and Western (Latin) churches.

  1. Note how each note corresponds to each word of the text, and how the chant is sung antiphonally, with one vocalist leading the way and the rest of the group following.
  2. Throughout the Medieval period, chant evolved from a simple text with one word per note to more intricate melodies that were accompanied by instruments.
  3. It is possible to hear an example of the evolution of chant text in the music of Hildegard von Bingen (1098 – 1179), who was an abbess as well as an artist, author, musician, mystic, apothecary, poet, preacher, and theologian.
  4. In all of these chant variants, the auditory traditions of music were created primarily through the institutions of churches, monasteries, and convents.
  5. These modes were analogous to today’s major and minor modes, but there was no idea of a “home key.” The modes were designated as follows: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Aeolian, and Locrian).
  6. At the same time that chant music was going through all of this expansion and development, Saint Benedict of Nursia (c.
  7. In his precepts book, which is known as the “Order of St.

At the crack of dawn, people laud (exalt) one another.

is prime time (at the start of the first hour).

Sext (sixth hour) is at noon.

Vespers (evening prayer) begins at 6 p.m.

When we look back at history, we can see that this Christian Mass became a cornerstone in the Monastic worship tradition during the 11th and 13th centuries.

In this section, you will find a sketch of a Mass that may have been celebrated in the eleventh century.

Kyrie Prayers Gloria Versicle/response Epistle Gradual – choral ensemble Alleluia-choir Gospel Credo Offertorium Prayers Sanctus and Benedictus are two Latin phrases that mean “sanctus” and “benedictus.” Mass canonization is a process that takes place at a church (Bread and Wine) The Pater Noster (Lord’s Prayer) is a traditional Catholic prayer.

  • Dismissal Pay attention to this intricate form of Renaissance polyphony, created by William Byrd in 1592 for a covert Christmas Day Mass conducted in the home of a devoted Catholic, which you can hear below.
  • It’s intriguing to think about how the music of the church has evolved throughout the years.
  • What does hearing the Kyrie anthem performed mean to you right now?
  • It can be heard in the music of Taizé, in church worship sessions, and on the concert stage, among other places.
  • Enjoy the sounds of a young choir performing the FBCH version of Franz Schubert’s German Mass, which was modified to English text by Richard Proulx, or scroll down to sing along with the original German version!

Seek out your favorite renditions of the Kyrie eleison; it is a seemingly limitless source of inspiration.

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Beginning with its Judaic foundations and progressing through the development of Gregorian chant to the Latin Mass, the history of early church music may be traced back to its beginnings. Our famous Kyrie poem has its origins in this place, and it has been put to music by several artists, including Hildegard von Bingen, William Byrd, and Franz Schubert (among many others). Kyrie eléison(, v) is a Greek hymn that means “Kyrie eléison.” Lord, please have compassion on me. English: Christe eléison(, ) is a Greek term that means “Christ the risen one.” Christian slang: Christ, have mercy The origins of church music may be traced back to the early Christians and their roots in ancient liturgical music of Judaism, according to certain scholars.

  • ), according to the Old Testament.
  • (Selah).
  • A single note was used for text, with basic melodic alterations to correspond with the grammatical text, most of the time antiphonally, by Jewish Cantors.
  • The practices of the synagogue were incorporated into Christian worship, despite the fact that this has not been verified by current standards.

Despite the fact that antiphonal singing may have originated among Christians who lived in close geographic proximity to the Jewish roots of Christianity, by the end of the 4th century, these methods of liturgical singing had become common in both Eastern Byzantium (Greek) and Western (Latin) churches.

  • Please take note of the way the notes match up with the words and how the chant is sung antiphonally, with one singer leading the way and the rest of the group joining in after that.
  • As chant evolved during the Medieval era, it progressed from basic text, with one syllable per note, to increasingly complex melodies.
  • Among the works of Hildegard von Bingen (1098 – 1179), an abbess and artist as well as a writer and composer as well as a poet, preacher and theologian is her music, which shows the evolution of chant text.
  • Aural traditions of music were established primarily through churches, monasteries, and convents in the context of all of these chant variants.
  • However, there was no idea of a “home key,” therefore these modes were akin to today’s major and minor modes.
  • The image that comes to me is a group of monks gathered around a rare and costly book of music, where the lead singer would say, “Kyrie in dorian mode,” and then glorious singing would break forth (hopefully).
  • Benedict of Nursia (c.

As part of his “Order of St.

At the crack of dawn, they laud (extol) 6 a.m.

In the third place, there’s a lot of room for improvement (3rd hour) the hour is nine o’clock.

Evening prayers are held about 6 p.m.

The Christian Mass became a staple of Monastic religious practice as the years passed from the 11th to the 13th century.

In this section, you will find an outline of a Mass that may have been celebrated in the 11th century.

Kyrie Prayers Gloria Versicle/response Epistle Gradual – choral ensembles Alleluia-choir Gospel Credo Offertorium Prayers Sanctus and Benedictus are two Latin phrases that mean “sanctus” and “benedictus” respectively.

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Dismissal You may hear William Byrd’s sophisticated rendition of Renaissance polyphony, which he wrote in 1592 for a covert Christmas Day Mass that was celebrated in the home of a devoted Catholic.

It’s amazing to think about how the music of the church has evolved throughout time.

Now, when you hear the Kyrie eleison, what does it signify to you?

In the music of Taizé, in church worship sessions, and on the concert stage, we may sense this spirit.

Listen to a young choir perform the FBCH version of Franz Schubert’s German Mass, which Richard Proulx has modified to English text, or scroll down to sing along with the original German text!

Find your favorite variations of the Kyrie text to study; it is a never-ending source of inspiration for many people throughout history.

Ancient and Modern371

Kyrie eleison is the title of this display. Kyrie eleison is the first line of the hymn. Psalm 51:1 is the text of the tune’s title. The year is 2013. In this section, you will find information about children and all-age worship, God’s kindness and mercy, penitence, and world-church music. Ancient and modern liturgical texts were used as sources for this study.

Ancient and Modern372

Kyrie Eleison is the title of this display. Kyrie eleison is the first line. Psalm 51:1 is the text for the tune. 2013, the year of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ In this section, you will find information on children and all-age worship, God’s kindness and mercy, repentance, and world-church music. Ancient and modern liturgical texts were used as sources for this project.

Christian Worship933

Kyrie is the name of the character on the screen. ‘Lord, have compassion’ is the first line. Psalm 51:1, Psalm 86:3, Matthew 17:15, Luke 17:13 are the scripture references for this tune. The year is 2021. Subject: Kyrie Irving’s “Service Music” Christian Praise and Worship933

Glory to God551

Kyrie is the name of the character on the display. To Begin with: “Lord, take compassion on me.” Psalm 51:1; Psalm 86:3; Matthew 17:15; Luke 17:13; Psalm 51:1; Psalm 86:3 2020 is the year of the calender. Subject: Kyrie | Hymn of Thanksgiving Church of the Brethren 933

Glory to God576

Showing the title “Lord, Have Mercy” Greetings from the first line: Lord, have compassion. SINGAPURA is the name of the tune. The year is 2013. Traditional liturgical text served as the source for this service music. God is exalted576.

Glory to God577

Showing the title “Lord, Have Mercy” Kyrie eleison is the first line of the hymn (Lord, have mercy) Title of the tune: KYRIE ELEISON (Reindorf)Date of composition: 2013Subject: Service Music |Source: traditional liturgical text God is exalted577.

Glory to God578

O Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie Eleison) (Oré poriaj verekó) is the title of the display. First Line: O Lord, have compassion (Kyrie eleison) (Oré poriaj verekó) (Kyrie eleison) (Oré poriaj verekó) Tune ORÉ PORIAJ VEREK is the title of the piece. Date: 2013Subject: Service Music | Source: Traditional Liturgical Text Date: 2013 God is exalted578.

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Glory to God579

O Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie Eleison) (Oré poriaj verekó) is the title of this display. (Oré poriaj verekó) is the first line of the hymn “O Lord, have mercy.” (Kyrie eleison) is the second line of the hymn “O Lord, have mercy.” Tune ORÉ PORIAJ VEREK is the title of this article. 2013Subject: Service Music | Source: Traditional Liturgy | Date: 2013 God be praised578.

Halle Halle22

Nkosi! is the title of the display. Nkosi! (Lord, Have Mercy on me. ) Nkosi! is the first line of the poem. Title of the tune: Nkosi (Lord, have compassion) The year is 1999. The subject of this prayer is petitioning. The source is traditional. Halle Halle Halle Halle Halle Halle Halle Halle 22

In Every Corner Sing41

Kyrie eleison is the title of this display (Lord, have mercy) Kyrie eleison is the first line of the hymn (Lord, have mercy) Title of the song:Date of release:2008 Short Chants and Liturgical Responses are the subject of this article.

| Source: Traditional Sing41 may be heard everywhere.

Journeysongs (2nd ed.)146

Kyrie Eleison is the title of this display (Lord, have mercy) Kyrie eleison is the first line (Lord, have mercy) Title of the song:Date of recording:2008 Short Chants and Liturgical Responses are the subject of this article. Sing41 may be heard in every neighborhood.

Journeysongs (2nd ed.)147

Kyrie eleison is the title of the display (Lord, have mercy) Kyrie eleison is the first line of the song (Lord, have mercy) Title of the song:Date of release: 2008 Short Chants and Liturgical Responses | Source: Traditional |Subject: Sing41 may be heard in every corner.

Journeysongs (3rd ed.)185

Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie, Eleison)First Line: Lord, have mercy (Kyrie, eleison)Tune Title:Scripture: Psalm 103:20Date: 2012Subject: Service Music for Mass | Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie, Elieson)Journeysongs (3rd ed.)185 pages

Journeysongs (3rd ed.)205

Display Title: Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie, Eleison)First Line: Lord, have mercy (Kyrie, eleison)Tune Title:Scripture: Psalm 103:20Date: 2012Subject: Service Music for Mass | Lord, Have Mercy/Kyrie, EliesonJourneysongs (3rd ed.)185 pages

Journeysongs (3rd ed.)233

Display Title: Lord, Have Mercy (Kyrie, Eleison)First Line: Lord, have mercy (Kyrie, eleison)Tune Title:Scripture: Psalm 103:20Date: 2012Subject: Service Music for Mass | Lord, Have Mercy/Kyrie, EliesonJourneysongs (3rd ed.)185

Lift Up Your Hearts635

Kyrie Eleison is the name of the character on the screen (Lord, Have Mercy) Kyrie eleison is the first line of the hymn (Lord, have mercy) KYRIE RUSSIA is the name of the tune. Scripture references: Psalm 36:5, Psalm 67:1, Psalm 90:14, Psalm 103:8-14, Isaiah 55:4, Matthew 9:27, Matthew 10:20-21, Matthew 15:22, Matthew 17:15, Luke 18:13, Ephesians 2:4, Philippians 2:4. The year is 2013. Element of Worship | Confession; Reactions to Confession | To Confession Early Greek liturgy was used as a source.

Lift Up Your Hearts637

Kyrie Eleison is the display title (Lord, Have Mercy) Kyrie eleison is the first line (Lord, have mercy) KYRIE RUSSIA is the name of the song. Scriptural references: Psalm 36:5, Psalm 67:1, Psalm 90:14, Psalm 103:8-14, Isaiah 55:4, Psalm 103:8-14, Matthew 9:27, Matthew 10:20, Matthew 15:22, Matthew 17:15, Luke 18:13, Ephesians 2:4. 2013, the year of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ Subjects: Elements of Worship | Confession; Responses | To Confession | Early Greek liturgy was used as a source for this information.

Lift Up Your Hearts639

Showing the title “Lord, Have Mercy” ‘Lord, have compassion’ is the first line. Song Title: LORD, HAVE MERCYComposer/arranger: Steve Merkel 4.4.6 D on the meter Scripture references: Psalm 36:5, Psalm 67:1, Psalm 90:14, Psalm 103:8-14, Isaiah 55:4, Matthew 9:27, Matthew 10:20-21, Matthew 15:22, Matthew 17:15, Luke 18:13, Ephesians 2:4, Philippians 2:4. The year is 2013. Element of Worship | Confession; Reactions to Confession | To Confession Raise Your Hearts in Praise 639

Gregorian Chant — “Kyrie Eleison”

Title of Display: Please, Have Mercy on Us. To Begin with: “Lord, take compassion on me.” Song Title: LORD, HAVE MERCYComposer/arranger: Steve Merkel. 4.4.6 D on the meter. Scriptural references: Psalm 36:5, Psalm 67:1, Psalm 90:14, Psalm 103:8-14, Isaiah 55:4, Psalm 103:8-14, Matthew 9:27, Matthew 10:20, Matthew 15:22, Matthew 17:15, Luke 18:13, Ephesians 2:4.

2013, the year of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ Subjects: Elements of Worship | Confession; Responses | To Confession | Raise Your Voices in Praise 639

Kyrie by Mr. Mister – Songfacts

  • The phrase “Lord, have compassion” is translated from Greek as “Lord, have mercy.” This prayer is utilized in both Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches as a kind of devotional singing. This song is ascribed to lead vocalist Richard Page, keyboardist Steve George, and lyricist John Lang
  • Greek was the original language of the New Testament and it was then translated into Latin
  • This song is credited to lead singer Richard Page, keyboardist Steve George, and lyricist John Lang. According to John Lang, who spoke to the Chicago Sun-Times on July 9th 2004, Page did not create the song after being assaulted, as was widely believed at the time “Richard Page composed the music and melody, but it was I who came up with the lyrics for the song. I was inspired to write it after hearing it sung in an Episcopal church in Phoenix when I was a child. Also, ‘Kyrie’ had nothing to do with Richard being assaulted, mostly because it wasn’t Richard who was assaulted, but rather it was me who was assaulted! However, this occurred three years before to the composition of ‘Kyrie,’ and had nothing to do with the song.” When this song became a hit, relatively few people who were listening to Top 40 radio were aware that they were singing “Lord Have Mercy, Down the Road that I must go!” at the time. The religious meaning was mostly lost in translation. Credit for the suggestion goes to: While Mr. Mister was not a Christian band, vocalist Richard Page regarded this song to be a prayer. Jeff – Charleston, SC
  • Mr. Mister was not a Christian band, but its leader Richard Page believed this song to be a prayer. Meditation, sitting still and recognizing that what I’m doing is trivial in the grand scheme of things, are some of the ways in which he derives strength, says him. “That’s what the song is all about,” the band says in the song, which was written while the band was on tour with Adam Ant. Despite the fact that it was a year before they recorded it, the band’s first hit single from the Welcome to the Real Worldalbum, ” Broken Wings,” peaked at number one in the United States in December 1985, giving them their first American chart-topper. The following song from the album, “Kryie,” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in March 1986
  • The music video was recorded in December 1985 while Mr. Mister was opening for Tina Turner on her Private Dancer tour
  • And Director Nick Morris captured footage of the band performing at the Hollywood Sportatorium in Pembroke Pines, Florida, where the band was scheduled to perform. Due to the proximity to the beach, Morris also photographed the band there, as well as film of them performing rock star things before the event, such as travelling in a limo and entering the dressing room. Morris, a British filmmaker who would go on to helm the videos for Europe’s ” The Final Countdown ” and Cinderella’s ” Don’t Know What You Got (Until It’s Gone),” had never filmed a music video in the United States before and was unaware that release papers were required to reveal anyone’s face. This created an issue when, after the film had been edited and circulated, he was requested for the releases from the elderly men on the beach with whom the band was shown conversing after the video was cut and distributed. As luck would have it, these people were regulars at this location, and a production assistant was able to locate them down and obtain their autographs
  • On the day they began filming, the band received a poor review in the Los Angeles Times, which was devastating to Richard Page. His face sank, and he was in the worst mood all day, believing he’d reached the end of his career as a serious musician, according to director Nick Morris in an interview with Songfacts. “I recall thinking to myself, “I’m not going to let my musicians, with whom I’m about to work, read papers on the day of the shoot.”

Kyrie Eleison

In the Roman Ritual of the Mass, an acclamation is made immediately after the penitential rite, in which the congregation praises the Lord and implores his compassion (General Instruction of Roman Missal, 30). The text of the Roman Rite consists of two primary invocations: “Kyrie eleison” (Lord, have mercy) and “Christe eleison” (Christ be exalted) (Christ, have mercy). The acclamation ” Kyrie eleison ” is frequently heard in the Eastern Christian liturgical tradition, particularly as a congregational response in the various litanies that are distributed throughout the eucharist and the divine office.

  1. After the middle of the 4th century, the Kyrie was first used in the Mass as the answer to a litany in the Antioch-Jerusalem rite, which was a response to a litany.
  2. The Deprecatio Gelasii is a litany that was defined by Pope Gelasius (492 – 96), and it was incorporated into the entry ritual of the Mass around the end of the 5th century.
  3. (d.
  4. Gregory, on the other hand, made some historically significant adjustments to the way it was written.
  5. Adding the Christe eleison was another another alteration made by Pope Gregory to the original text.
  6. The Kyrie was added to the end of the stational litany fairly early on as a separate entity from the rest of the litany.
  7. This practice is preserved in the current Easter Vigil, in which the litany takes the place of the entry action and the Kyrie of the Vigil is the Kyrie of the Liturgy.

The Kyrie should be sung until the Pope gives the signal to halt, according to the Ordo Romanus I (about 700).

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Armand’s Order of the Order of the Romanus IV (St.

It was originally intended to be sung as a communal acclamation, but by the time of the first Roman Order (Order Romanus 19, ed.

By the 12th century, the two semichoruses of clerics — of which theschola was a member — were simply rotated in their singing of the nine invocations, which were sung by the entire congregation (Liber usuum O.

262,Patrologia Latina166:1435).

For example, the Kyriale, Troparium, and Sequentiarium (all from the 10th century) of St.

lat.

The Kyries listed as numbers 3 to 6 in the Graduale Romanum are among the ornate settings found in the St.

Many of these intricate melodies were the direct result of the introduction of tropes in the ninth and tenth centuries, according to Anglo-Saxon tradition (Angl è s, 126).

Blume has released 158 full tropes (Analecta hymnica47:43 – 216), the majority of which are in Latin.

It was Amalarius of Metz who first recorded the Kyrie eleison, Domine Pater, miserere; Christe eleison, miserere qui nos redemisti sanguine tuo; Kyrie eleison, Domine, Spiritus Sancte, miserere; Kyrie eleison, Domine, Spiritus Sancte, miserere; Kyrie eleison, Domine, Spiritus Sancte, misere (De off.

This trope is not included in any of the song books, although the tropeAlme domineis built in a similar manner (Analecta hymnica47:163).

The troped Kyrie is described as follows by the Winchester Troper: “Incipiunt laudes preces, quae voce latina thus resonant: Miserere tuis, O Christe, misellis” (Initiation of Lauds), “Miserere tuis, O Christe, misellis” (Initiation of Lauds), “Miserere tuis, O Christ (see Blume,Analecta hymnica47:1).

The distinction between therahmen (surrounding) tropes (new musical and textual material that precedes or follows the original Kyrie setting, or that separates the groups of three) and thetextual tropes (new musical and textual material that precedes or follows the original Kyrie setting, or that separates the groups of three) is critical in understanding the Kyrie tropes (i.e., textual interpolations, laid out syllabically on the single notes of disaggregate melismatic settings of the Kyrie).

  • Therahmentrope is typically considered to be uncommon, but thetextualtrope is discovered to be quite common.
  • lat.
  • The textualtropes are represented in a variety of ways in the MSS.
  • The melismatic form is notated first in the St.
  • In the St.
  • One may infer that there is a commensurate difference in performance from the use of two different styles of notation.
  • Kirchenmusik57).

A total of 226 chant melodies for the Kyrie have been discovered in the 493 MSS that have been researched (Melnicki, 13).

Rom.

Rom.).

The following is an example of one of these newly generated forms: AXA, BXB, and CXC are the initials of the companies.

Rom.).

Vatican Kyries 15 and 16 are likewise extremely early, and along with Kyrie 18 comprise a remarkable collection of songs.

Because it descends to E — the first tone of Gloria 15 — Kyrie 16 is a good illustration of this characteristic.

As a canon of modality, the Kyrie was not associated with a particular psalm tone.

The last of the Kyrie’s medieval settings served as the foundation for the modality of the settings.

Of these, the G and D modes were by far the most often used.

A loosely linked set of E-mode tunes with a triadic structure that was very popular in German sources was very popular in German sources (E-G-H, or C).

lat.

The genuine and plagal modes were separated in this way as well within the broader modal groupings.

The settings of the Proper are characterized by a strong sense of melodic unity, whilst those of the Kyrie are characterized by a distinct regional flavor.

With regard to the Propers, the medieval MSS demonstrate an almost unbelievable consistency in the transmission of both the melody and the neume groupings, whereas with regard to the Kyrie settings, the transmission of the Kyrie settings reveals a significant number of melodic variants as well as discrepancies in the melismatic neume groupings from region to region.

  • H.
  • A.
  • 11, pages 226–27.
  • callewaert, “LesÉ tapes de l’histoire du Kyrie,” Revue d’histoire eccl é siastique38 (1942) 20 – 45.
  • callewaert, “LesÉ tapes de l’histoire du Kyrie,” Revue d’histoire eccl é siastique38 (1942) 20 – 45.
  • callewaert Graduale Romanum is an abbreviation for Graduale Romanum (Tournai 1961).
  • Handschin titled “Trope, Sequence, and Conductus.” j.

jungmann and colleagues F.

Brunner’s translation of the Roman Rite, 2 vols.

1:333 – 46.

Melnicki, “Das einstimmige Kyrie des lateinischen Mittelalters” (The first Kyrie of the Middle Ages) (Regensburg 1955).

st blein, Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart (Music in History and Contemporary Times).

blume (Kassel-Basel 1949 –) is a German painter.

3 vols.

3 vols.

3 vols.

3 vols (Hildesheim 1962).

de clerck, La priè re universelle dans les liturgies latines anciennes: textes liturgiques, t é moignages patristiques (Mü nster 1977); Journal of the Plainsong and Medieval Music Society3 (1980) 40–48; Journal of the The Urban Character of Christian Worship: The Origins, Development, and Meaning of Stational Liturgy (J.

F. Baldovin, The Urban Character of Christian Worship: The Origins, Development, and Meaning of Stational Liturgy) (Rome 1987). A study of the Kyrie Eleison and the Entrance Rite of the Roman Eucharist by J. F. Baldovin was published in Worship 60 (1986) 334 – 47.

Gregorian chant

In the Roman Ritual of the Mass, an acclamation is made immediately after the penitential rite, in which the congregation praises the Lord and implores him to show compassion (General Instruction of Roman Missal, 30). There are two primary invocations in the Roman Rite: “Kyrie eleison” (Lord, have mercy) and “Christe eleison” (Christ be exalted) (Christ, have mercy). The acclamation ” Kyrie eleison ” is frequently heard in the Eastern Christian liturgical tradition, particularly as a congregational response in the various litanies that are interspersed throughout the eucharist and the divine service.

  1. It was about the middle of the 4th century that the Kyrie was first heard in a Mass setting as the response to a litany in the Antioch-Jerusalem rite.
  2. An ancient litany, known as the Deprecatio Gelasii, was defined by Pope Gelasius (492 – 96), and it was included in the entry ritual of the Mass at the end of the 5th century.
  3. (d.
  4. While it was in its original form, Gregory made certain significant adjustments that were historically significant.
  5. Adding the Christe eleison was another adjustment made by Pope Gregory to the liturgy.
  6. The Kyrie was added to the end of the stational litany as a separate piece of music relatively early in its development.
  7. Today’s Easter Vigil, in which the litany substitutes the entry action and its Kyrie serves as an emphases on Christ’s death and resurrection, maintains this tradition.

The Kyrie should be sung until the Pope gives the signal to halt, according to the Ordo Romanus I (about 700) St.

Armand) of the early ninth century stated that nine invocations to be sung, which gave origin to the conventional ninefold Kyrie.

It was not uncommon for two semichoruses of clergy — one of which included the Schola — to simply rotate in singing the nine invocations by the 12th century (Liber usuum O.

262,Patrologia Latina166:1435).

For example, the Kyriale, Troparium, and Sequentiarium (all from the 10th century) of St.

lat.

The Kyries listed as numbers 3 to 6 in the Graduale Romanum are among the ornate settings found in the St.

In fact, many of these ornate melodies were the natural outgrowth of the advent of tropes in the ninth and tenth centuries, according to Anglo-Saxon tradition (Anglè s, 126) Starting with the tropeAlme Pater, which is merely the first verse of today’s version, Kyrie 10 in the Graduale Romanum begins.

  • Counting the incomplete cases brings us to a total of around 175 instances.
  • eccl.36,Patrologia Latina105:1113).
  • The tropedKyrie has been given a plethora of names in medieval manuscripts.
  • Other words used in early French texts were prosulae, prosae, orversus ad Kyrie eleison, in addition to the termlaudes preces.
  • According to most sources, therahmentrope is rather uncommon, but thetextualtrope is fairly common.
  • lat.
  • Within the MSS, there is a wide range of markings for literary motifs.

The melismatic form is notated first in the St.

The troped version is put first in the St.

One may infer that there is a similar difference in performance from this double style of notation.

Kirchenmusik57).

226 chant melodies for the Kyrie have been discovered in 493 MSS that have been analyzed (Melnicki, 13).

The three forms are as follows: (1) AAA, which is the simplest form based on litanic models and which contains approximately one-fifth of all the melodies; (2) ABA, which is a Da capoform which contains approximately one-fifth of all the melodies (see Kyries 2, 5, 11, and 18 in Grad.

); (3) ABC, which is the most recent of the three forms, although its earliest specimens date from the 10th century; (see Kyrie 9 inGrad.

Extensive variation in shape may be found in the third group.

AA; BXB; CXC are the initials of the companies.

Rom.).

Rome’s Kyrie 15 and 16 are likewise quite early, and together with Kyrie 18 they form a remarkable group.

Because it descends to E — the initial tone of Gloria 15 — Kyrie 16 is a good illustration of this characteristic.

As a canon of modality, the Kyrie was not associated with a certain psalm tone.

Kyrie’s medieval settings were distinguished primarily by their modality, which was based on the ending.

The G and D modes were the most often used of these.

A loosely linked set of E-mode tunes with a triadic structure that was extremely popular in German sources (E-G-H, or C).

lat.

A similar distinction was made between genuine and plagal modes among the major modal groupings in this study.

Most of the Proper’s settings are highly melodically cohesive; nonetheless, most Kyrie settings are primarily regional in nature, as shown in the following examples.

With regard to the Propers, the medieval MSS demonstrate an almost unbelievable consistency in the transmission of both the melody and the neume groupings, whereas with regard to the Kyrie settings, the transmission of the Kyrie settings reveals a significant number of melodic variants as well as differences in the melismatic neume groupings from region to region.

  1. “Gregorian Chant,” in the New Oxford History of Music, edited by J.
  2. Westrup (New York, 1957–), 2:126–27 (h.angls, “Gregorian Chant”).
  3. callewaert, “LesÉ tapes de l’histoire du Kyrie,” Revue d’histoire eccl é siastique38 (1942) 20 – 45; c.
  4. m.
  5. c.
  6. New Oxford History of Music 2:128–74 (J.
  7. A.
See also:  What Does The Nhl Chant She Said No

(New York, 1951–55).

(Regensburg 1955).

St.

The artist f.

3 vols.

3 vols.

3 vols.

Journal of the American Musicological Society33 (1980) 1–41; Journal of the Plainsong and Medieval Music Society3 (1980) 40–48; p.

Journal of the Fellowship of Reformed Theologians (JFRC): The Urban Character of Christian Worship: The Origins, Development, and Meaning of Stational Liturgy (The Urban Character of Christian Worship) (J.

F. Baldovin) (Rome 1987). A study of the Kyrie Eleison and the Entrance Rite of the Roman Eucharist by J. F. Baldovin was published in Worship60 (1986) 334 – 47.

Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century

The second chapter is titled “New Styles and Forms.” MUSICAL NOTATIONS FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURYR Mr. ichard Taruskin (nickname) The Kyrie eleison, the only remaining “ordinary” chant, has a more complicated—and, at times, perplexing—history than the others. Its uniqueness is obvious first and foremost in its language, which is the only Greek language to have survived in the Latin Mass. The Kyrie eleison is a Latin phrase that expresses the same thing as Domine, miserere nobis: “Lord, have mercy on us” (compare the middle part of the Gloria in Excelsis and the Agnus Dei refrain).

  • A letter sent by Pope Gregory the Great, in one of the few musically or liturgically significant acts that can be firmly identified with his name, commanded in a letter that the formulaKyrie eleisonshould alternate with the formulaChriste eleison (“Christ, have compassion on us”).
  • “Chapter 2 New Styles and Forms,” The Oxford History of Western Music, by Richard Taruskin, MLA citation style: “Richard Taruskin.” Oxford University Press, New York, USA, n.d.Web.
  • Oxford University Press, New York, USA, n.d.
  • (n.d.).
  • Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century is published by Oxford University Press.
  • Richard Taruskin’s Citation (Chicago):Richard Taruskin was retrieved on December 21, 2021.
  • Retrieved on the 21st of December, 2021, from Users who do not have a membership will not be able to view the entire site.

The Book of Gregorian Chant

Liturgical music and Latin texts make up the bulk of the book’s content. It is the chants from the Ordinary of the Mass that comprise the majority of the manuscript, including arrangements of the Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei, Ite Missa Est, Deo gratias, and Benedicamus Domino texts. In this collection, you’ll find a variety of chants from various Proper settings, such as those from the Asperges Mass, the Requiem Mass, the Mass for a Church’s Dedication, the Mass for the Purification of Mary (Candlemas), and others.

  • Francisci, the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Lady Day), Maundy Thursday, and Palm Sunday, among other occasions.
  • The UMKC Library Catalog contains a comprehensive listing of the manuscript’s contents, which can be found here.
  • Six scribes appear to have contributed to the book, according to an examination of the notation features..
  • In addition to the initial notation, other scribes “fixed” the work of prior scribes, which was done in a variety of ways.
  • The process of comparing the original with the new version of various chants, and then comparing those two versions with other medieval sources, was critical in determining the publication date of the book.
  • This, together with the fact that the number of staff lines varied from four to six lines per staff in the manuscript, indicates that at least a portion of the book was written before the standard staff for chant notation were established.
  • Alumnus of the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music James Adair purchased the manuscript in 1968 while visiting Seville, Spain.

Adair has determined that a stamp in purple ink that occurs on three folios (folios 26r, 93r, and 98r) is an official identifying mark from the Spanish government.

Adair presented the book to the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory Library in 1973, which later became a component of the Miller Nichols Library.

Janet K.

Dr.

Every chant in the UMKC text has been recorded in contemporary notation, which is the most significant outcome of her endeavor.

Dr.

A lecture-recital based on chosen chants from the UMKC text was delivered on April 16, 2000, at the RLDS Temple in Independence, Mo.

Kraybill was the guest speaker for the event.

After the chants, Dr.

Dr.

Dr.

Kraybill, who graciously provided a recording of it.

They are the Kyrie and Alleluia from the Mass for the Dedication of a Church, as well as the Antiphon from the Palm Sunday celebration.

Kraybill’s transcriptions of them, are also available on this website for viewing and listening.

Kraybill has contributed digitized photographs from the book for use in this web exhibit, in addition to the written text.

The experience and research of Ms.

Moses Ong, Special Collections volunteer and former student assistant, who gave extremely beneficial technical support. We would like to express our gratitude to Rob Ray, our previous Special Collections Librarian, for his leadership and assistance during this endeavor.

Kyrie

An acclamation that is sung immediately after the Introit in the Latin Mass is known as the Kyrie. Lord, have mercy on us,’ says the fundamental text, which is in Greek, which is composed of the phrases ‘Kyrie, eleison’ (three times), ‘Christe, eleison’ (three times), and ‘Kyrie, eleison’ (three times): ‘Lord, have mercy on us,’ says the text. Please, Christ, have mercy on me. ‘Lord, take compassion on me.’ After becoming popularized as part of pagan civic and religious events throughout the Roman Empire, the phrase ‘kyrie eleison’ continued to be employed in Christian rites, eventually becoming a staple of many Christian liturgies beginning in the 6th century and continuing today.

(This information comes from the New Grove II Dictionary of Music and Musicians Online.) The audio element cannot be played because your browser does not support it.

Kraybill’s performance of the Kyrie eleison is available on CD.

Alleluia

An acclamation that is sung immediately after the Introit during the Latin Mass is known as the Kyrie. Lord, have pity on us,’ says the core text, which is in Greek, which is composed of the phrases ‘Kyrie, eleison’ (three times), ‘Christe, eleison’ (three times), and ‘Kyrie, eleison’ (three times). Thank you, Jesus for your kindness. Have mercy on me, O Lord. ” After becoming popularized as part of pagan civic and religious events throughout the Roman Empire, the phrase ‘kyrie eleison’ continued to be employed in Christian rites, eventually becoming a staple of many Christian liturgies beginning in the sixth century.

This information is derived from the New Grove II Dictionary of Music and Musicians Online.

Recording of the Kyrie by Dr.

Antiphon

The Kyrie is an acclamation that is sung immediately after the Introit in the Latin Mass. The main text, which is in Greek, is composed of the phrases ‘Kyrie eleison’ (three times), ‘Christe eleison’ (three times), and ‘Kyrie eleison’ (three times): ‘Lord, have compassion.’ The rest of the text is in English. Please, Jesus, take mercy on me. ‘Lord, take compassion on us.’ After becoming popularized as part of pagan civic and religious events throughout the Roman Empire, the phrase ‘kyrie eleison’ continued to be employed in Christian rites, eventually becoming a fixture in many Christian liturgies from the 6th century onward.

(This information comes from the New Grove II Dictionary of Music and Musicians Online).

The Kyrie from Dr.

Credo

According to an examination of the peculiarities of the notation, it appears that six scribes worked on the UMKC’s Book of Gregorian Chant. ‘Scribe 1’ is responsible for the majority of the manuscript’s work, which includes the biggest illumination in the text, a capital “P,” which occurs on folio 82r and takes up more than half of the page (left). In addition to the initial notation, other scribes “fixed” the work of prior scribes, which was done in a variety of ways. On the right is a page from the manuscript (folio 8r), which was written by another scribe and features an illumination of the letter “P,” but this illumination is much different from the previous one.

Kraybill, “the illuminations distinguish and enhance the beauty of this book, as is true of many medieval instances.” Many various colors of pen were used to produce these text decorations, including black, red, teal blue, dark blue, green and orange.

As a result, a wide variety of techniques were employed, yielding results that ranged from extremely ornate and colorful decorations that filled the margins from top to bottom with beautiful filigree to very crude, “colored-in” letters that appeared to be a clumsy attempt by an unskilled hand to imitate the beauty of the former.

Folio 8r has the final section of the Asperges Antiphon with Psalm, as well as the first section of an unnamed Credo, among other things (which also begins with an illuminated “P”).

Although we have three Latin Creeds (the ‘Apostles’, the ‘Nicene, and the ‘Athanasian’), the history of the texts is complicated; nonetheless, the one used at Mass is the one often referred to as the ‘Nicene.’ Early in the 6th century, the Credo was introduced into the eucharistic liturgy in the eastern church in the form known as the ‘Nicene’ (or ‘Nicea-Constantinople’) version (so named because it summarizes the doctrines agreed upon at the Councils of Nicea, 325, and Constantinople, 381), and soon after that, it was introduced into the Visigothic rite by the Council of Toledo (589).

In both cases, it was instituted in the wake of theological disputes, with the goal of defining the conviction that all those who participate in the Eucharist should hold in common.

Baptismal usage of the Credo (or Symbolum, as it was known in this capacity) persisted throughout the Middle Ages, and it is thought to have been responsible for the maintenance of a Greek text in Latin manuscripts depicting customs in northern France and Germany during this period.

(Image courtesy of the New Grove II Dictionary of Music and Musicians on the Internet.)

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