Why Chant Cak In The Kekak Dance

Kecak – Wikipedia

Kecak

Kecakdancers inUluwatu
Native name Tari Kecak
Origin Indonesia

A kind ofBalinese Hindu danceand song theater known in Indonesia as kecak (pronouncedpronounced(listen)(“kechak”), also known in other languages as kechak and ketjak, and first performed inBali, Indonesia in the 1930s, is known in other languages as kecakilolahhe. In fact, since its inception, it has been done mostly exclusively by males, with the first women’s skecakgroup forming in 2006. According to legend, the dance is based on the narrative of the Ramayana and is routinely performed in temples and villages throughoutBali.

Kecakhas had its origins in sanghyang, an exorcism dance that induces a trance.

History

Astari kecakilolahhe, also known as kecak, is a style ofBalinese Hindu dance and music theatre that originated in Bali, Indonesia, in the 1930s. Kecak is pronouncedpronounced(listen)(“kechak”) and has several other spellings, including kechakandketjak. As a result of its origins, it has mostly been done by males, with the first women’s skecakgroup debuting in 2006. According to legend, the dance is based on the narrative of the Ramayana and is routinely performed in temples and villages around Bali.

A trance-inducing exorcism dance, Kecakhas has its roots in Sanghyang.

Performance

A style ofBalinese Hindu danceand song theater called in Indonesia as kecak (pronouncedpronounced(listen)(“kechak”), also known in other languages as kechak and ketjak, and first performed inBali, Indonesia in the 1930s, is known internationally as kecakilolahhe. Since its inception, it has mostly been done by males, with the first women’s skecakgroup forming in 2006. Traditional performances in temples and villages throughoutBali are based on the account of theRamayana. The dance, which is also known as theRamayana monkey chant, is done by a circle of as many as 150 performers who wear checkered cloths around their waists and move their hands and arms in time to the rhythmic chanting of ” chak “.

The performance represents a battle from theRamayana, in which the monkey-likeVanaras, headed byHanuman, aid PrinceRama in his struggle against the wicked KingRavana, as told in the epic poem. Kecakhas had its origins in sanghyang, an exorcism dance that induces trance.

Dancers

Kecak (pronouncedpronounced(listen)(“kechak”), variant spellings:kechakandketjak), also called in Indonesian astari kecakilolahhe, is a style ofBalinese Hindu danceand music theater that originated in Bali, Indonesia, in the 1930s. Since its inception, it has been done mostly by males, with the first women’s skecakgroup forming in 2006. The dance is based on the narrative of the Ramayana and is historically performed in temples and villages throughoutBali. The dance, which is also known as theRamayana monkey chant, is done by a circle of as many as 150 performers who wear checkered cloths around their waists while shouting ” chak ” and waving their hands and arms.

Kecakhas has its origins in sanghyang, a trance-inducing exorcism dance.

Trance

A kind ofBalinese Hindu danceand song theater known in Indonesia as kecak (pronouncedpronounced(listen)(“kechak”), also known in other languages as kechak and ketjak, and first performed inBali, Indonesia in the 1930s, is known in other languages as kecakilolahhe. In fact, since its inception, it has been done mostly exclusively by males, with the first women’s skecakgroup forming in 2006. According to legend, the dance is based on the narrative of the Ramayana and is routinely performed in temples and villages throughoutBali.

Kecakhas had its origins in sanghyang, an exorcism dance that induces a trance.

In popular culture

On the soundtracks of the following films, you may hear excerpts from Kecak’s music:

  • On the soundtracks of the following films, you may hear excerpts of Kecak:

Several scenes, featuring kecakdance, may be seen in:

  • Kecakdance scenes can be seen in the following films:

Several scenes, featuring kecakdance, may be seen in the following films:

  • A track named “The Oracle” from the 1993 video gameSecret of Mana/Seiken Densetsu II used the sounds of gamelan and kecakchants
  • The sounds of gamelan and kecakchants were also included in the soundtrack for the game Secret of Mana/Seiken Densetsu II. When the gameplay reveals a Bali arena setting, a clip of kecakchanting combined with Balinesegamelancan be heard in theSNKNeo Geoarcade video gameThe King of Fighters ’97. Aside from that, the arena has backdrop animation of kecakchanters on the right side, Barongdance in the middle, and gamelan performers in front of a large audience on the left side. One example of a visual portrayal of the dance is seen in the Ritual Passion level of Tetris Effect, where the dance beats in rhythm with the player’s movements. In Dota 2, kecaksounds creates the sound effect for the Monkey King’s ultimate ability, which can be heard in the game.

A track named “The Oracle” from the 1993 video gameSecret of Mana/Seiken Densetsu II included the sounds of gamelan and kecakchants; the sounds of gamelan and kecakchants were also included in the soundtrack of the game Secret of Mana/Seiken Densetsu II. During the gameplay of theSNKNeo Geoarcade video gameThe King of Fighters ’97, which takes place in a Bali arena, a sample of Kecakchanting combined with Balinesegamelan can be heard. Aside from that, the arena has backdrop animation of kecakchanters on the right side, Barongdance in the middle, and gamelan performers in front of a large audience on the left side; In the Ritual Passion level of Tetris Effect, a visual representation of the dance can be seen, which beats in rhythm with the player’s movements.

  • A tune named “The Oracle” from the 1993 video gameSecret of Mana/Seiken Densetsu II included the sounds of gamelan and kecakchants. When the gameplay reveals a Bali arena setting, a clip of kecakchanting combined with Balinesegamelan may be heard in theSNKNeo Geoarcade video gameThe King of Fighters ’97. The arena also features backdrop animation with kecakchanters on the right side, Barongdance in the middle, and gamelan performers with a full audience on the left side
  • In the Ritual Passion level of Tetris Effect, a visual representation of the dance can be seen, which beats in rhythm with the player’s movements. In Dota 2, kecaksounds is responsible for creating the sound effect for the Monkey King’s ultimate ability.

Other performers were influenced by the sound ofkecakhas, including:

  • Another artist that was influenced by the sound ofkecakhas was

See also

  • The sound ofkecakhas influenced a number of other musicians, including:

Sources

  1. “Cultural Liberty Under Spotlight at Women Playwrights,” Jakarta Post, 3 December 2006, accessed 13 August 2010
  2. AbMichel Picard, “Cultural Liberty Under Spotlight at Women Playwrights,” Jakarta Post, 3 December 2006, accessed 13 August 2010. (April 1990). In Indonesia, cultural performances are used as a tourist attraction in Bali, a practice known as ‘cultural tourism’ (Vol. 49 ed.). The Southeast Asia Program Publications of Cornell University are published on pages 37–74. According to James Clifford’s book, The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1988), page 223 is a good example of this. Yamashita (1999), page 178, cites this source. The following article was written by Shinji Yamashita: “Review: Michel Picard,Bali: Cultural Tourism and Touristic Culture,” Indonesia, Vol. 67, No. 4, April 1999, pp. 177–182 (in Indonesian). Cornell University’s Southeast Asia Program Publications
  3. “Review: Kecak: The Vocal Chant of Bali, by I Wayan Dibia,” British Journal of Ethnomusicology, Vol. 6, (1997), pp. 195–195. David W. Hughes, “Review: Kecak: The Vocal Chant of Bali, by I Wayan Dibia,” British Journal of Ethnomusicology, Vol. 6, (1997), pp. 195–195. The British Forum for Ethnomusicology
  4. “Archived atGhostarchive.org and theWayback Machine:” YouTube
  5. s^
  6. s^ Interview with John Adams, conducted before to the Cincinnati Opera’s performance on June 30, 2011
  7. Review: . David Harnish is the author or authors of this work. David Lewiston’s Kecak from Bali was one of the works that were reviewed. Ethnomusicology, Vol. 35, No. 2, (Spring – Summer, 1991), pp. 302–304
  8. Ethnomusicology, Vol. 35, No. 2, (Spring – Summer, 1991). University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Society for Ethnomusicology has published this book.

External links

  • Featured in David Attenborough’s 1969 BBC program, The Miracle of Bali
  • Kecak dance performed at Uluwatu temple
  • Kecak dance
  • Featured in David Attenborough’s 1969 BBC program, The Miracle of Bali
  • Kecak dance performed at Uluwatu temple
  • Kecak dance

Kecak Dance – The Monkey Chanting Dance

Kecak dance in David Attenborough’s 1969 BBC program, The Miracle of Bali; Kecak dance being performed in Uluwatu temple; Kecak dancing;

What is the Kecak Dance?

The Kecak Dance, like many other Balinese art performances and dances, is a performance that tells an epic story from the perspective of Balinese mythology. The dance tells the narrative of the Ramayana and has been performed since the 1930s, when it was initially envisioned. Tradition has it that a group of 30 or more bare-chested Balinese males will execute the ritual. However, the first groups of Balinese women began to perform the Dance in 2006, marking the beginning of a new era. Actually, the word “Kecak” refers to the trance-like chanting that the dancers audibly recite while performing during the dance.

Additionally, there is a widespread notion among the residents that spectators must pay close attention to the storyline or else they may become possessed as well — this is of course merely a fiction that the locals like to utilize to make matters more intriguing!

Where to watch it

Pura Luhur Uluwatu is located in Uluwatu. If you’re up for a longer journey, though, you may see the legendary Kecak Dance, which is performed at Uluwatu Temple, on Bali’s southernmost tip. Because of the expansive view of the Indian Ocean that serves as the backdrop, this place has a distinctive appeal. While the dance is being done, you may take in a breathtaking sunset. Pura Dalam Kaja is located in Ubud. Ubud, the cultural hub of Bali, is home to the Kecak Dance, which can be seen in the Pura Dalam Kaja, one of the most beautiful temples in the world.

Fortunately, Ubud is not far away from the Mara River Safari!

Hence, make sure you schedule some time to see the Kecak Dance, in addition to other traditional Balinese dances.

Traditional Kecak Dance in Bali

It is known as the Uluwatu Pura Luhur. The legendary Kecak Dance, performed at Uluwatu Temple on Bali’s southern tip, is worth the extra drive if you don’t mind a bit of a lengthier trek. As a result of the wide vista of the Indian Ocean in the background, this place has a distinct allure. As the dance is done, you can take in a breathtaking sunset. Located in Ubud, Indonesia, Pura Dalam Kaja Ubud, Bali’s cultural capital, is home to the Kecak Dance, which can be seen at the Pura Dalam Kaja, one of the most important temples in the country.

Lucky for us, Ubud is a short drive away from the Mara River Safari. Without taking in the vibrant cultural scene of Bali, a visit would be incomplete. Hence, make sure you schedule some time to witness the Kecak Dance, in addition to other traditional Balinese dances!

The Origins of the Kecak Dance

Uluwatu Pura Luhur Uluwatu, Uluwatu, Uluwatu If you’re up for a lengthier journey, though, the legendary Kecak Dance is performed at Uluwatu Temple, which is located on Bali’s southernmost tip. The unrestricted vista of the Indian Ocean as a backdrop lends a certain beauty to this place. While the dance is being done, you may take in the breathtaking sunset. Pura Dalam Kaja is located in Ubud, Indonesia. Ubud, the cultural capital of Bali, is home to the Kecak Dance, which can be seen at the Pura Dalam Kaja, one of the most important temples in the area.

Fortunately, Ubud is not far from the Mara River Safari!

Hence, make sure you schedule some time to witness the Kecak Dance, along with other traditional Balinese dances!

Music with no instruments

Uluwatu Pura Luhur Uluwatu, Uluwatu If you’re eager for a lengthier trip, the legendary Kecak Dance is performed at Uluwatu Temple, which is located on Bali’s southernmost tip. The wide vista of the Indian Ocean as a backdrop lends a certain beauty to this place. While the dance is being done, you may take in the gorgeous sunset. Ubud’s Pura Dalam Kaja is a popular tourist destination. Ubud, the cultural hub of Bali, is home to the Kecak Dance, which can be seen at the Pura Dalam Kaja, one of the most important temples in the area.

See also:  Gregroian Chant Sung By Who

Fortunately, Ubud is not too far away from the Mara River Safari!

So make sure to schedule some time to watch the Kecak Dance, as well as other traditional Balinese dances!

Mexican Wave

To create an effect similar to the mexican wave, the guys construct a circular perimeter around the stage that moves in time with the chant. The narrative of Prince Rama begins to unravel in the center of the stage. The plot traditionally begins when prince Rama, along by his wife Sita and brother Lakshmana, travels to the woods for a vacation. Ravana kidnaps Sita and imprisons her in his fortress while she is there. Rama appeals for assistance and sent Lakshmana to track out his buddy Sugriva, the King of the Monkey Kingdom, who has gone missing.

Initially, Ravana triumphs, but Sugriva and Hanuman rush to Rama’s assistance with monkey warriors, and Rama is victorious.

Trance Fire Dance

Dance of the trance-inducing flames A bonfire is built on stage and coconut husks are thrown onto the flames to mark the end of the play. Before performing the trance dance, the priest blesses the dancer who would portray the figure Hanuman. He then dances through the fire, kicking the charred husks and sprinkling embers on the audience and performers. He is not aware of any discomfort since he is in a trance. At sunset, one of the greatest spots to witness this one-of-a-kind spectacle is against the background of Uluwatutemple.

For additional information on this trip with Diving Indo, please visit this page.

Sita of the Kecak and Fire Dance

I’d recently returned from a trip to Bali with my best friend, Nat, and I was feeling refreshed. In Uluwatu Temple, we were able to see the Kecak and Fire Dance, which was a highlight of the trip for us. Just as the sun is setting, the dancers begin to move to the beat of the music against a spectacular backdrop of gold, orange, red, and pink. In the words of Wikipedia, “Kecak is also known as theRamayana Monkey Chant, and is a performance piece that depicts a battle from theRamayana. It is performed by a circle of at least 150 performers wearing checked cloth around their waists, percussively chanting “cak,” and moving their hands and arms.

  • Kecakhas has its origins in a trance-inducing exorcism dance known as sanghyang.” You are captivated for an hour as you witness a performance that is packed with magic, dramatic hand and eye movement, humorous tales, and the occasional tourist who stands up and blocks your view of the stage.
  • After the show has concluded, you are encouraged to snap photographs of the actors and staff.
  • She was rocking a stunning eye makeup look at the time.
  • Herlina Arisetyani, an actor, was responsible for bringing her to life.
  • It was a riot of color and intensity!
  • According to my observations, the eye shadows were done with a wet brush method.
  • This product likewise performed admirably, as evidenced by the fact that there was no evidence of fall out when I photographed it an hour after the performance began.

At the end of the makeup application procedure, black was utilized as a finishing touch.

Then a purple eye makeup was put to her lids, all the way down to her socket line, to complete the look.

This was applied in an upward and outward manner, beginning at the inner corner of the eye and blending and extending as it went.

Her eyes were given a “lift” as a result of this.

The black shadow on her lower lash line was applied at an angle to give her a more dramatic look.

As a result of her hooded eyelids, I assume she placed some black eye shadow along her top lash line, although it isn’t evident in this photo.

Using this eye makeup, she was able to make her eyes appear larger and more dramatic as she began performing during the Kecak and Fire Dance performance.

Similar eye makeup was also utilized on another actress who portrayed the character of Laksmana, who appeared in the film.

I’m not sure if the small variance in the character’s eye makeup is indicative of his or her sexual orientation.

After all, for the most of the narrative, Rama and Laksamana were preoccupied with the search for Sita, who had been kidnapped.

However, that is often the hue that is available for theatrical makeup.

Sita did have a beautifully shaped nose.

However, I believe the actress did this in order to create greater symmetry.

It was also noteworthy that Sita’s blush did not appear to be as strong as the rest of the actors.

Her eyes were made to stand out even more as a result of this application.

Sita also wore a bindi, which had some grains adhered to the center of her forehead.

Sita, along with Rama and Laksamana, all donned a mauvy-red lipstick during the festival of Durga.

Whilst I was putting up this blog post, I reached out to Herlina via private message on Instagram, asking her what brand of cosmetics she was using.

Unfortunately, I was unable to locate any official internet presence for the brand, but I was fortunate enough to come across a few Indonesian bloggers who had reviewed a variety of goods from the company on their own blogs.

Body makeup and theatrical makeup are two applications for these water activated pigments.

The eye makeup appears to be more vibrant in some photographs.

I’m confident that the sights I witnessed at the Kecak and Fire Dance were only a fraction of what is available for these sorts of activities.

~ The Kecak & Fire Dance is performed at Uluwatu Temple on a daily basis (weather permitting) beginning after sunset (about 5:45 p.m.) and concluding at around 7 p.m.

For the Kecak and Fire Dance, you’d have to spend an additional 100,000 Indonesian Rupiah (a little over $7) on top of your ticket price.

The ticket counter opens at 5 p.m.

There is no clear demarcation between the two.

Prepare to get crushed if you don’t follow the rules. During my time in Bali, I participated in a day trip that included this expedition. If you are interested, you can learn more about the trip operator by clickinghere to visit their website. “Hello!” may be spoken on Instagram at

Understanding Kecak (Kechak) Fire Dance at Uluwatu Temple: The Traditional Dance Form of Bali

After a trip to Bali with my best friend, Nat, I was feeling rejuvenated. In Uluwatu Temple, we were able to see the Kecak and Fire Dance, which was one of the most memorable parts of our journey. The dance begins just as the sun begins to set, creating a spectacular backdrop of gold, orange, red, and pink hues to complement the dancers’ attire. In the words of Wikipedia, “Kecak is also known as theRamayana Monkey Chant, and is a performance piece that depicts a battle from theRamayana. It is performed by a circle of at least 150 performers who wear checked cloth around their waists, percussively chanting “cak,” and moving their hands and arms.

  1. A trance-inducing exorcism dance, Kecakhas has its roots insanghyang.
  2. In case you’d want to have a look at any Kecak dancing videos, you may find a lot of them on YouTube.
  3. As a chance to picture Sita, I took advantage of the situation.
  4. Sita is a character in the play who has a number of roles.
  5. Her eye makeup was quite appealing to me.
  6. I was intrigued by her photographs and wanted to know more about the creative process behind her work.
  7. It was possible to see incredible pigment payoff in some photographs.

My guess is that she started with the yellow highlighter.

You can notice a tinge of the color yellow above her brow makeup, which indicates that the color black was placed on top of the yellow base.

In order to integrate and intensify the look, a violet colored eye makeup was put along her socket line.

Her brows looked great with this color since it was beautifully blended.

At an angle, she used black eyeshadow to define her bottom lash line.

As a result of her hooded eyelids, I assume she placed some black eye makeup along her top lash line, although it isn’t evident in this photograph.

When she started performing during the Kecak and Fire Dance, this eye makeup truly helped to make her eyes appear large and dramatic.

Another actress who performed the character of Laksamana was also given a similar eye make-up look.

In terms of the character’s sex, I’m not sure if the slight variance in eye makeup is indicative of that.

After all, for the most of the narrative, Rama and Laksamana were preoccupied with the pursuit of Sita, who had been abducted.

Although it does not change the overall appearance of the face, it does provide some depth and color.

A dramatic effect was created by this.

Her matte highlighter was also applied on the bridge of her nose, the cupid’s bow, and the bottom of her lower lip, which I found to be rather subtle and flattering on her.

From her cheekbones all the way to her temples, she wore it like a headdress.

Her cheekbones, forehead, and jaw line did not have any excessive contouring.

They explained that they believed this would help them concentrate better.

In order to avoid over-extending her lips, Sita placed a substantial amount of lipstick to her lips.

It was Ranee, she claimed.

The Aqua Color from Kryolanor and the Ben NyeMagicake Aqua Paint are two products I would use if I were to attempt this look on myself.

~ After looking through several photographs on the internet, I’ve discovered that this particular makeup look is extremely prevalent during religious events or cultural activities that are specific to Balinese Hinduism, and that it is quite common during religious ceremonies and cultural activities.

  • Bright blues, blazing reds, scorching pinks…
  • I’m confident that what I saw at the Kecak and Fire Dance was only a fraction of the graphics that are available for these sorts of events.
  • ~ Daily (weather allowing) performances of the Kecak and Fire Dance are held at Uluwatu Temple, beginning at sunset (about 5:45pm) and ending around 7pm.
  • Paying an additional 100,000 Indonesian Rupiah (a little more than $7) to see the Kecak and Fire Dance is required.
  • Tickets are available for purchase starting at 5pm on the day of purchase.

Prepare to get crushed if you don’t follow the instructions. During my time in Bali, I purchased a day trip that included this expedition. Check out the tour agent’s website by clicking here if you’re interested in learning more. “Hello!” may be spoken on Instagram by visiting

  • When Sita instructs Lord Rama to pursue and capture the Golden Deer for her, the Golden Deer is captured. A phony scream is overheard by Sita who sends Rama and her help out to pursue after him. Taking the call as an urgent need for assistance from her husband, Sita instantly asks her brother in-law to go and assist him. Before departing, Laxman establishes a protective perimeter around Sita to ensure that she is not exposed to harm. A fascinating thing to see is how the choir’s singing creates a border between two areas. In the second scene, the demon King Ravana appears, claiming to have a reason to kidnap Sita. Having been unsuccessful in his initial effort (because to the barrier that had been established by the Laxman), he disguises himself as a thirsty elderly man and is successful in his quest to capture Sita. Garur (the bird Jatayu) rushes to Sita’s aid and attempts to defend her from King Ravana, but he is terribly damaged and dies as a result of his efforts. The Monkey God, Hanuman, appears on the scene, where he attempts to meet Sita in order to deliver the message of Lord Rama to her.

This is followed by a Fire Dance, in which it is demonstrated how Hanuman sets fire to the Demon King Ravana’s country, Lanka, in order to defeat him. The Kecak dance has been performed almost exclusively by men since its inception, with the first women’s Kecak ensemble forming only a few years ago. Let us talk about the Kecak Fire Dancers and their performances. There are two sorts of performers in this place: one who chants and another who portrays figures from the Ramayana story. During the performance, certain of the male chanters have specific responsibilities.

See also:  Areosmith Lyrics Where They Chant Oooh Yeh

One of the men acts as the chorus’s leader, telling them on when to stop and when to start the chanting by screaming command vocals such as “Diih!” Another guy serves as the chorus’s leader, instructing them on when to stop and when to start the chanting.

It’s easy to see because of the fluidity with which the maneuvers are executed.

To summarize, this is a performance that should not be missed!

  • Kecak dance performances in Bali are typically held daily in the evening (6 pm) at Balinese Hindu temples such as Uluwatu Temple and Tanah Lot
  • However, there are dance stages dedicated solely to kecak performances in Ubud, Garuda Wisnu Kencana, Batu Bulan, Pandawa beach, and other locations throughout the island. If you want to obtain the greatest seat in the house, arrive early.

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Kecak Dance – The Perfect Sunset at Uluwatu, Bali — Steemit

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At this point everything we’d seen of Bali had been breathtaking, so any suggestion of his would just be icing on the cake.

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Blue Point is a surfer’s paradise: solid waves, a couple chill bars, not completely overrun with people. For us, the views (and Bintang) were enough:

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From there Maruta, our super rad taxi driver, took us to the Uluwatu temple to finally witness the Kecak dance we’d heard so much about.

The views from this location weren’t too awful either: The Uluwatu Temple is seen from here. In front of the Uluwatu Temple There is a little “stadium” a short distance down the trail from the temple, where we eagerly anticipated the Kecak dance performance. The stadium may be seen in the distance from the Uluwatu Temple, which is located nearby. While we’re waiting for the dance to begin, The Kecak dance begins, with Uluwatu Temple in the background.

The dance is a traditional Balinese art performance that conveys a portion of the Hindu epicRamayanathrough dance and chanting. A large group of men clothed in checkered wraps chant as they often encircle or are seated around the characters of the Ramayana epic. Fire is typically brought into the dance as well, as we saw in the version performed at Uluwatu.

Check out the video in our next post to discover how the Kecak dance is performed!

Do you have any recommendations for the Blue Point/Uluwatu area? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below! Nomadic Gear is now available on YouTube! Nomadic Gear may be found on Twitter! Nomadic Gear has a Facebook page! Nomadic Gear may be found on Instagram! Ourwebsite!

The Kecak dance, a staple of the Balinese dance repertoire.

We’ve Got a Rhythm Going! The iconicKecakdance, which is performed by large groups of shirtless men chanting in rhythmic counterpoint to other dances that depict scenes from the ancient Mahabharata, is a staple of the Balinese dance repertoire that is enjoyed by thousands of visitors to Bali every day, according to the Bali Tourism Board. , – each phase of the kecak is interrupted by choruses of sung “cak…cak….cak” (pronounced as ‘chak, chak, chak’), which can number as many as 150 in some cases, and is often as long as 150 meters.

  1. The old man scratched his chin and remarked that each theory, taken separately or together, may very well be correct.
  2. During a prayer service at a nearby temple, a Sanghyan medium, who was deep in trance, conveyed a message from the resident deities, who demanded a new kind of music and dancing that was not accompanied by the bronze instruments of a typical Balinese orchestra.
  3. After assisting in the organization and training of Kecak cultural organizations, which went on to tour the world promoting Balinese culture beginning in the mid-1960s, I Made Sija of Bona is widely acknowledged as being responsible for the most recent resurgence of Kecak.
  4. Setting out an hour or two during a Bali vacation to watch a Kecak dance performance should be on the top of every visitor’s “must do” list.
  5. Those considering attending a kecak may find the storyline summary provided below helpful in following the main thread throughout the film.
  6. As the three dancers revolve, a golden deer arrives and begs to be captured by Prince Rama, who reluctantly obliges.
  7. After hearing a plea for “help,” Sita tells Laksmana that the voice in anguish must be that of her husband Rama, compelling Laksmana to believe her.

Sita’s insinuations cause Laksmana to leave the stage, leaving Sita all alone in the wilderness, insulted.

His early attempts are fruitless, prompting him to change himself into Bhagawan — an elderly man praying for water from the Goddess Sita – in order to obtain water.

Sita’s cry for help are heard by the mythical Garuda bird, which is flying nearby and replies by attempting to free the captive Goddess of mercy.

The nefarious Rahwana then transports Sita to Alengka Pura, which serves as his private residence.

Rama yearns for his beloved wife Sita, who is now imprisoned in the palace of the villainous Rahwana, and enlists the help of the White Monkey Hanoman to carry his ring to the prisoner Sita as a symbol of their everlasting love for one another.

A little time later, in the Alengka Palace, the White Monkey Hanoman enters, announcing himself as Prince Rama’s Emissary and presenting Sita with the ring that belonged to her husband.

Hanoman doesn’t waste any time in wreaking devastation on the Alengka Palace, destroying most of Rahwana’s royal domain in the process.

The legendary Hanoman manages to elude capture and rescue Sita, who is then restored to Rama with the help of his vast magical resources. Bali Discovery Tours is a tour company based in Bali.

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Our Rhythm Is Working! A hallmark of the Balinese dance repertory, the Kecakdance is performed by huge groups of shirtless men chanting in rhythmic counterpoint to other dances that depict stories from the ancient Mahabharata. It is enjoyed by hundreds of visitors to Bali every day. , – each portion of the kecak is interrupted by choruses of sung “cak…cak….cak” (pronounced as ‘chak, chak, chak’), which can number as many as 150 in some cases, and is often as long as 150 feet. The haunting sounds of the kecak have been the subject of endless debate among dance enthusiasts in Bali, who contend that the sounds represent an army of primates in the service of the monkey-like warrior Vanara; duplicate the percussive sounds of the drums and gongs of the agamelan orchestra (gamelan suara); imitate the sound of the household gecko lizard; or, at its most basic level, draw their inspiration from the “cak” singing of farmers heard in the evening In front of an elderly Bali dance instructor, we presented all of these possible explanations for the peculiar sound of the Kecak.

  • The old man scratched his chin and remarked that any theory, whether taken separately or together, may well be correct.
  • During a prayer service at a nearby temple, a Sanghyan medium, who was deep in trance, delivered a message from the resident deities, who demanded a new style of music and dancing that was not based on the bronze instruments of a conventional Balinese orchestra.
  • After assisting in the organization and training of Kecak cultural organizations, which went on to travel the world promoting Balinese culture beginning in the mid-1960s, I Made Sija of Bona is widely acknowledged as being responsible for the most recent resurgence of Kecak.
  • A Kecak dance performance should be included on every visitor’s “must do” list when in Bali, even if it just takes an hour or two.
  • In order to follow the story thread, those considering attending a kecak may find the storyline outline provided below beneficial.
  • The three dancers are circling when a golden deer arrives, pleading for Prince Rama’s attention and capture.
  • It is at this point that Sita insists to Laksmana that the call for “help” is most likely the voice of her husband Rama, who is in trouble.

In response to Sita’s accusations, Laksmana leaves the stage, leaving Sita all alone in the wilderness.

Due of his failure to obtain water from the Goddess Sita, he transforms himself into Bhagawan, an elderly man who begs for water from the Goddess.

While flying close, the mythical Garuda bird hears Sita’s cries for help and replies by attempting to free the imprisoned Divine Mother.

Rahwana then transports Sita to Alengka Pura, which serves as his private residence.

The White Monkey Hanoman agrees to help Rama carry his ring to his loving wife Sita, who is currently imprisoned in the palace of the wicked Rahwana.

Scene 4Sita now spends her days regretting the departure of her husband Rama, who is accompanied by Trijata, the Demoness niece of Rahwana.

Then Sita gives flowers to Hanoman, who then gives them to Rama, along with a note asking for Rama’s immediate rescuing intervention.

After this, the royal guards apprehend Hanoman, who is tied and ready to be burned at the stake as a kind of punishment.

Hanoman escapes and rescues Sita, who is then restored to Rama with the help of his vast magical power reserves. Bali Discovery Tours is a tour company that specializes in exploring Bali’s natural and cultural heritage.

Kecak Dance

Kecak, commonly known as the monkey chanting dance or the Ramayana Monkey Chant, is a fascinating fire trance dance that is performed in Indonesian villages. The origins of the dance may be traced back to approximately 1930. It is widely regarded as one of Bali’s most distinctive hallmark dances, alongside the Janger and Barong dances, and is performed throughout the island. It not only steals the show, but it is also quite exceptional because it has no musical background at all, other than the chanting of an exclusive male chorus humming a “keh-chack” sound that dominates the entire performance as well as body percussion sounds, which are the only sounds heard during the performance.

  • In addition to wearing checkered fabric around their waists, the performers chant and raise their arms in an upbeat manner as part of the cak chant.
  • First and foremost, it does not have any musical accompaniment, as opposed to other Balinese dances.
  • ‘Ke-chak’ is a polyrhythmic sound produced by a chanting (monkey) chorus, and it is developed from this sound.
  • The group of performers forms a stage by congregating in a circle around a burning candle.
  • When the sole lighting is provided by the flame, the dance will have a primal feel to it, which will be especially effective if it is performed outside.
  • A German composer and painter named Walter Spies became so engrossed in this rite during his time in Bali during the 1930s that he set out to recreate it as an original theatre based on the Hindu epic, the Ramayana.
  • Spies working closely with Limbak and Wayan Libak helped to publicize this dance by accompanying the Balinese artists on their worldwide travels.

Spies was taken aback by this innovation and proposed the development of a similar scenario, but based on the Ramayana and supplemented with cak chorus rather than gamelan, as had been the case previously.

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Carving and painting are two more types of alternative art expression.

The story begins with Sita and Rama’s arrival in the Dandaka jungle, where they are joined by Laksmana (Ram’s younger brother).

In order to abduct Sita, Rahwana orders Marica, his prime minister, to seek to isolate her in order for him to take her.

In the end, she is successful in convincing Laksamana by accusing him of cowardice, and in the end, he concedes and goes to aid Rama, but with considerable reluctance.

If Sita is left alone, she becomes a convenient target for Rahwana, who uses his cunning to pose as an elderly priest in need of food and shelter, luring her into his trap.

When they arrive at the Alengka Palace, Rahwana tries everything he can think of to entice Sita, but to no effect.

He demonstrates this by displaying Sita Rama’s ring.

Meanwhile, Laksamana, Rama, and Tualen are hot on Sita’s trail when they come face to face with Rahwana’s son, Meganada, who they capture and imprison.

He fires an arrow that instantaneously morphs into a dragon, which overwhelms the group and ties them up with ropes for safety.

The duo continues their rescue expedition, and they are subsequently joined by Sugriwa, the Monkey King, and his monkey army, who assists them in their endeavor.

Meganada, on the other hand, is the undisputed loser.

While this may not be enough to whet your appetite, you will be thrilled to find that there are other viewing locations where you may see the creation of this incredible artwork.

Furthermore, you may take in the stunning performances at Tanah Lot, which is located in the Tabanan-based Beraban hamlet, which conducts daily performances at the Surya Mandala Cultural Park, as well as at the Surya Mandala Cultural Park.

Dance in Bali is a great method to show ethnic variety in a compelling creative style, and it is particularly popular among tourists.

In terms of Balinese dances, there is no better way to unwind while on vacation than by witnessing a live performance of the Kecak (Kecak dance). Reduce your reading time.

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It was really hot and sticky. My buddies and I made our way down the narrow sidewalk in single line in search of the temple. The dance began punctually at 7 p.m., and I wanted to be certain that we had reserved seats. Every time we stopped to ask a shopkeeper a question, they would respond with “straight.” As a result, we continued to slog along. After reading about the dance plays that take place in Ubud, I was a little concerned that they might be difficult to follow. Without the ability to comprehend the language, we would have no way of knowing what was being said.

  1. What piqued my interest about the Kecak dance was that I discovered it was based on the Indian epic, Ramayana, which was fascinating.
  2. I was confident that I would grasp it because I was previously familiar with the narrative!
  3. The Balinese, for example, do not believe in the cycles of reincarnation and rebirth, as do many other cultures.
  4. We finally made it to the temple and were able to get seats directly in front of the main altar.
  5. There were chairs arranged near the back of the temple as well as along the side walls.
  6. The shouting signaled the start of the dance.

Check out the performers in the video below, who are wearing checkered material around their waists and shouting “cak” while raising their arms, earning them the nickname “Kecak.” The dance is staged in the style of a musical, and it depicts a battle from the Ramayana, in which Prince Rama, with the assistance of the monkey-like Vanara, defeats the wicked King Ravana.

  • I simply surrendered to the chanting and reveled in the passionate and exquisite movements of the dancers on the stage.
  • I thought that one of the female dancers was portraying Sita, Prince Rama’s wife, who was kidnapped by Ravana, based on the way she moved.
  • In the Indian epic Ramayana, he is the demon king with ten heads who is defeated by Rama.
  • I was wrong.
  • There were gorgeous dancers in intricate costumes and delicate motions, and it was a lovely show to watch.
  • That was never more clear to me than while I was watching the Kecak dance, which took place in Ubud.
  • Of course, there were times when I felt a little lost – for example, I had no clue who the character in the picture above represented until I looked it up online.

If you happen to be in Ubud and want to learn more about the history and culture of the people, the Kecakdance is a fun and educational method to learn about the great epic that started in India while having a good time.

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History and modern practice of Kecak, the “monkey chant” of Bali

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How I got to know about Kecak

I first learned about Kecak through the 1992 film Baraka, and I owe a great deal to Ron Fricke’s film for igniting my interest in different cultures, as well as my desire to travel and experience the globe, both of which were previously existent in me but received a significant boost as a result of it. I was so taken aback by Baraka’s Kecak scene that I made a commitment to myself that I would experience it in person as soon as possible. I have yet to do so. And I did, as well as witnessing the first woman’s Kecak group in history, which was an added bonus.

They are clothed simply, in a modest sarong tied around the waist with a scarf, with a red hybiscus flower on the right ear and a white hybiscus bloom on the left ear, respectively.

Hands are furiously moving, and everything is being directed by a choir mistress.

The origins of Kecak

This Ron Fricke’s 1992 film, Baraka, is largely responsible for my interest with different cultures, desire to travel the world, and want to see the wonders of the world, all of which were previously there in me but received a significant boost as a result of the film. I was so taken aback by Baraka’s Kecak scene that I made a commitment to myself that I would see it in person as soon as possible. I have yet to do so. And I did, as well as witnessing the first woman’s Kecak group in history, which was a highlight of the experience.

Ten bamboo torches illuminate the court.

And then there’s an eruption of sound, a complicated vocal polyrhythm that lacks any tone, a hail storm of voices all at once. Things are moving at breakneck speed as the choir mistress directs them to do it.

Kecak against deadly diseases, the story of Bona village

I first learned about Kecak through the 1992 film Baraka, and I owe a great deal to Ron Fricke’s work; my interest with various cultures, as well as my desire to travel and experience the globe, which were already existent in me, received a significant boost as a result of the film. I was so taken aback by Baraka’s Kecak scene that I made a pledge to myself that I would experience it in person as soon as possible. And I did, as well as seeing the first ever female Kecak group in history. Ten bamboo torches illuminate the temple’s court, and a group of ladies of various ages, perhaps 50 or 70 in number, march in and form a circle.

And then there’s an eruption of sound, a complicated vocal polyrhythm without any tone, a hail storm of voices.

The history of modern Kecak

Soon after that, a large bearded guy enters, his outfit a work of art, and his expressions both amusing and terrifying at the same time. He is Ravana, Rama’s arch-enemy, and he is poised to steal the lovely Sita… Hanuman, the monkey warrior, on the other hand, is prepared to battle for his master’s bride. In the history of Bali, the 1930s were a particularly difficult decade. The dutches had gained control of the island in 1908, using intimidation and civilian killings to accomplish their goal.

  • As a result, the Netherlands’ reputation as a kind and responsible colonial authority suffered a significant setback.
  • When the Dutch arrived in Bali, they transformed themselves into scholars and defenders of Balinese culture.
  • Meanwhile, as a result of the orientalist obsession sparked by the 1900 Universal Exposition in Paris, a swarm of western artists began to pour into the country.
  • Spies happened to come upon the Kecak, which was presumably already popular at the time, and he was impressed with it.

Nowadays Kecak and the first all-women group

Currently, the Kecak performances are mostly based on the ideas created by Spies and Limbak, with the Cak choir providing accompaniment to certain iconic scenes from the Ramayana. Fire dances, which are also adapted from religious ceremonies like thetari sung hyang jaran, are frequently performed after the performances, which run between 60 and 90 minutes. The religious significance of the performance has been completely lost; in fact, the performance is taking place in the most exterior region of the temple rather than its inner core, a zone that, although being sanctified, is intended to host profane activities.

Kecak was originally intended to be a male-only pastime, but these females defied the odds by putting on an incredible display.

Kecak, on the other hand, retains its allure; the music makes the audience dizzy, the costumes of the major characters are exquisitely detailed, and the firelight and general ambiance exude a mystical aura that is mesmerizing.

Where to see Kecak in Bali

The town of Ubud, which serves as the island’s cultural and tourism hub, is unquestionably the most convenient location to witness traditional dance and music performances. However, while wandering around Bali, it is highly likely that you will come across traditional celebrations and rituals that include a variety of dances, theater performances, and music; however, there is almost no way to plan for this in advance, and the only way to witness a genuine Balinese ceremony is to be in the right place at the right time.

The majority of the venues are in Ubud town center, not far from the Royal Palace, but other alternative events take place in adjacent villages, such as the Jegog (the bamboo Gamelan), for which free transportation from the Ubud Tourism Office is given by the Ubud Tourism Office.

You may get a list of future events, as well as information on ticket prices and timings, from the tourist information center, which is located on the main crossroad in the north of the town (near the Royal Palace).

The entry cost for most of the events is roughly 7USD, and the shows are all between 90 and 120 minutes in length, with the majority of them taking place around 7 or 7:30 p.m.

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