Why Do Buddhist Chant

Achieving Mindfulness With Buddhist Chanting

When you visit a Buddhist temple, you may hear people chanting in the background. All schools of Buddhism have some form of sung liturgy, however the content of the chants varies greatly from one school to the next. It is possible that newbies will feel uncomfortable with the practice. In our religious tradition, the standard text is typically read aloud or sang throughout the worship session, but we don’t chant very often, if at all. For another thing, many westerners now regard liturgy as an unnecessary relic of a previous, more superstitious era in which we no longer live.

Offerings of incense, food, and flowers may be made to a person depicted on an altar by priests.

If you are under the impression that Buddhism is a nontheistic religious practice, this may appear to be a weird development.

Chanting and Enlightenment

However, if you comprehend what is going on, you will know that Buddhist liturgies are not designed to be performed in order to worship a god, but rather to assist us in realizing enlightenment. In Buddhism, enlightenment (bodhi) is described as the state of being free of one’s illusions, particularly those of the ego and the existence of a distinct self. This awakening is not a change in our intellectual thinking, but rather a shift in how we feel and interpret things. Making chants is a means of increasing awareness, and it is a tool for helping you wake up more quickly.

Types of Buddhist Chants

The texts that are recited as part of Buddhist liturgies are divided into a number of distinct categories. Here are a few examples:

  • The chant may be the entirety or a portion of the asutra (also called asutta). A sutra is a sermon delivered by the Buddha or by one of the Buddha’s followers to the people. Although the Buddha lived for about 500 years, a vast amount of sutras from Mahayana Buddhism were written after his death. In addition, see ” Buddhist Scriptures: An Overview ” for more clarification.
  • The chant can be an amantra, which is a brief sequence of words or syllables that is repeated repeatedly and is believed to have transformational power. The mantra isom mani padme hum, which is linked with Tibetan Buddhism, is an example of a chant. Making a conscious effort to repeat a mantra can be a kind of meditation
  • Adharaniiis similar to a mantra, albeit it is often lengthier. A dharani is supposed to hold the essence of a teaching, and chanting it again and over again may elicit some positive force, such as protection or healing, for the one reciting it. Chanting a dharani has a subtle effect on the chanter’s state of mind as well. Dharanis are traditionally recited in Sanskrit (or some approximation of what Sanskrit sounds like). Agatha is a brief stanza that may be chanted, sung, or repeated
  • Sometimes the syllables have no clear meaning
  • It is the sound that is important. Gathas have frequently been translated into the language of the chanters in the Western world. At the same time, unlike mantras and dharanis, what gathas say is more significant than how they sound.

Some Buddhist chants are only available to students of specific schools of thought. In Buddhism, the practice of chanting the name of Amitabha Buddha is known as theNianfo (Chinese) or theNembutsu (Japanese). This practice is found exclusively in the severalPure Landforms of Buddhism. Nichiren Buddhism is related with theDaimoku, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, which is a declaration of confidence in theLotus Sutra and is associated with the Buddhist sect known as Shingon Buddhism. As part of their daily formal ritual, Nichiren Buddhists recite theGongyo, which is composed of portions from theLotus Sutra, as well as other chants.

How to Chant

If you are new to Buddhism, the greatest suggestion is to pay close attention to what everyone else is doing and then copy it. Pitch your voice such that it is in unison with the majority of the other chanters (no group is ever fully in unison), mimic the loudness of the people around you, and begin chanting at the appropriate pitch. You are all participating in the same activity while you are chanting as part of a group service, so don’t only listen to yourself chant. Everyone should be heard at the same time.

You will most likely be provided the written-out text of the chanting liturgy, which will include transliterations of foreign language in English.

(If you don’t understand, keep listening until you do.) Respect your chanting book and its contents. Keep an eye out for how other individuals are holding their chanting books and attempt to imitate their position.

Translation or Original Language?

Those new to Buddhism should pay close attention to what those around them are doing and copy what they are doing exactly. To begin chanting, pitch your voice such that it is in unison with the majority of the other chanters (no group can ever be fully in unison), mimic the loudness of the people around you, and begin chanting. You are all participating in the same activity while you are chanting as part of a group service, so don’t simply listen to yourself. All of the people should be heard at the same time Become a member of a unified front.

Then continue to listen until you understand what I’m talking about.

Keep an eye out for the way other individuals are holding their chanting books and attempt to imitate their style as closely as possible.

Why Do Nichiren Buddhists Chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo?

A: According to Nichiren Daishonin, the practice of meditation is encompassed within the chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo (Nam Myoho Renge Kyo). Meditation has a lengthy history in both the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, dating back thousands of years. It was first documented approximately 1500 BCE, and it was then imported and assimilated into Buddhism during the period of the Buddha, Shakyamuni, who was the founder of the religion. Even throughout the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni speaks of himself and others as being in various states of samadhi, which is a form of meditative concentration that is focused on concentrating one’s thoughts.

  • This meditation technique, which is founded on the premise of “three thousand worlds in a single moment of existence,” was created as a means of helping individuals summon the state of Buddhahood from within themselves by understanding the actual nature of their own lives.
  • Due to the fact that it required a tremendous deal of attention and time, individuals living everyday lives in harsh realities did not have the luxury of devoting the necessary time and energy to such an endeavor.
  • “Even though the sutra talks of Shakyamuni attaining samadhi, this does not imply that members of the Latter Day Saints should seclude themselves in the mountains and forests and practice sitting meditation,” President Ikeda writes in The Heart of the Lotus Sutra.
  • 26–27).

To help all people awaken to Buddhahood within their own lives during this defiled age of the Latter Day of the Law, he instituted the practice of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and directly manifested the Mystic Law with which he had become enlightened in the form of the Gohonzon, which is still in existence today.

In addition, these five characteristics, known as the Myoho-renge-kyo, are included inside the single existence of each of us,” according to Nichiren Daishonin’s “The Doctrine of the Three Thousand Realms,” which appears in The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol.

85.

Essentially, chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the most comprehensive Buddhist practice available today, allowing all individuals to awaken to their Buddha nature, the most authentic component of their lives.

chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo It was Nichiren who first articulated the core of the Lotus Sutra as Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, opening the door for all individuals to gain enlightenment, or total bliss, via the practice of meditation.

(p. 6)

A Buddhist chant is a type of musical poem or incantation that is similar to religious recitations of other faiths in that it is performed to music.

Traditional chanting

Chanting is the traditional method of preparing the mind for meditation in Buddhism, and it is especially important as part of formal practice (in either alayormonasticcontext). Chanting is used for ceremonial purposes in some kinds of Buddhism as well. While thePali Canon serves as the foundation for most Theravadachants, Mahayana and Vajrayananachants depend on a broader range of literature.

Theravada chants

When it comes to the Theravada tradition, chanting is normally done in Pali, with vernacular translations interpolated here and there. The following are some of the most prominent Theravada chants:

  • Buddhabhivadana (Preliminary Reverence for the Buddha)
  • Tisarana (The Three Refuges)
  • Pancasila (The Five Precepts)
  • Buddhabhivadana (Preliminary Reverence for the Buddha)
  • Buddhabhivadana (Preliminary Reverence for the Buddha). BuddhaVandana (Salutation to the Buddha)
  • DhammaVandana (Salutation to his Teaching)
  • SanghaVandana (Salutation to his Community of NobleDisciples)
  • Upajjhatthana (The Five Remembrances)
  • Upajjhatthana (The Five Remembrances). Metta Sutta (Discourse on Loving Kindness)
  • Mangala Sutta (Discourse on Blessings)
  • Metta Sutta (Discourse on Loving Kindness). Consideration of the Body (recitation of the 32 sections of the body)
  • Reflection on the Soul

Smot is the term used to refer to traditional chanting in Khmer Buddhism.

Mahayana sutra chants

It is known as Smot in Khmer Buddhism, which means “traditional chanting.”

  • Nichiren Buddhism’s daily practice consists of repeating the five-character mantraNamu Myhh Renge Kyo (Namu Myh Renge Kyo is the name of the Buddha) (homage to the truedharmaof the LotusSutra). A Mahayana sutra that discloses Shakyamuni’s actual identity as a Buddha who reached enlightenment many kalpas ago, according to the teachings of the Buddha. The Lotus Sutra of the marvelous law is the title of Kumarajiva’s translation, which has received widespread acclaim (Myoho Renge Kyo). Throughout all of time, past, present, or future, the mystic tie between the law and the lives of the people continues unbroken in any lifetime, no matter how long it has been. On the issue of spatial location, the Nichiren enjoins his disciples and lay followers to see the inheritance of the ultimate rule as flowing inside their lives as they strive in perfect oneness for the attainment of a peaceful world and happiness for all mankind. Nichiren practitioners will chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo – the genuine aspect of all phenomena – and read passages from the Lotus Sutra, particularly the 2nd and 16th chapters
  • They will also participate in a chanting contest.
  • Namu Myh Renge Kyo (Namu Myh Renge Kyo) is chanted on a daily basis in Nichiren Buddhism (homage to the truedharmaof the LotusSutra). A Mahayana sutra that discloses Shakyamuni’s actual identity as a Buddha who reached enlightenment many kalpas ago, according to the teachings of the Mahayana school. The Lotus Sutra of the marvelous law is the title of Kumarajiva’s translation, which is largely regarded as excellent (Myoho Renge Kyo). Throughout all of time, past, present, or future, the mystic connection between the law and the lives of the people continues unbroken in any lifetime. According to the Nichiren school of thought, the inheritance of the ultimate rule flows inside the lives of his disciples and lay followers, who strive in perfect oneness for the attainment of a peaceful world and happiness for all people. In addition to reciting specific chapters from the Lotus Sutra, particularly the 2nd and 16th chapters, Nichiren practitioners will do the chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, which means “truth aspect of all things.”

Vajrayana chants

Craving is also utilized as an invocative ritual in theVajrayanatradition in order to focus one’s thoughts on a god, Tantricceremony, mandala, or particular notion that one desires to develop further in oneself. The chantOm Mani Padme Humis extremely famous among Vajrayana practitioners all over the world, serving as both a praise of peace and the principal mantra of Avalokitesvara at the same time. Chants of Tara, Bhaisajyaguru, and Amitabha are some of the most famous in India. Tibetan monks are renowned for their mastery of atthroat-singing, a particular type of chanting in which the chanter can generate numerous separate pitches at the same time by amplifying the upper partials of his or her voice, as seen in the video below.

Critique of melodious chanting

Craving is also utilized as an invocative ritual in theVajrayanatradition in order to focus one’s thoughts on a god, Tantricceremony, mandala, or special notion that one desires to develop further in one’s own mind. Om Mani Padme Humis a mantra that is immensely popular among Vajrayana practitioners all around the world since it is both a hymn of peace and the fundamental mantra of Avalokitesvara. Tara, Bhaisajyaguru, and Amitabha are some of the other prominent chants. In Tibetan chanting, Tibetan monks are renowned for their mastery of atthroat-singing, which is a particular type of chanting in which the chanter can generate numerous unique pitches at the same time by amplifying the upper partials of his voice.

Defense of chanting

The usage of chanting sutras was defended by John Daido Loori, who cited the Zen teacher Dgen as an example. “Painted rice cakes will not satiate hunger,” according to Dgen, who is credited with debunking the assertion. This phrase implies that sutras, which are only symbolic objects like as painted rice cakes, are unable to fully fulfill one’s spiritual appetite. Dgen, on the other hand, recognized that there is no distinction between metaphor and reality. As the saying goes, “There is no difference between paintings, rice cakes, or anything else.” Since both the symbol and the represented were intrinsically the same, it was only via the sutras that one could find true satisfaction in one’s spiritual demands.

  • Dgenstates makes a distinction between ceremonial and liturgical practices “In a ceremony, there are forms and noises, there is knowing and believing, and there is a sense of belonging.
  • One can reduce the distance that exists between oneself and the liturgy by listening with one’s full being.
  • Duality is overcome when one devotes one’s entire essence to a single specialized practice or activity.
  • Chanting deeply permits one to get an experience of a non-dual world as a result.

In this approach, personal liturgical practice aids in the realization of emptiness (sunyata), which is at the center of Zen Buddhist teachings and practices.

Non-canonical uses of Buddhist chanting

There are also a variety of New Age and experimental schools associated with Buddhist thinking that practice chanting, some of which need knowledge of the words, others of which are based only on repetition. Along with Buddhist influences, a substantial number of these schools are syncretic, including Hindujapa and other traditions into their curriculum. In its own right, JapaneseShigin() is not exactly a version of Buddhist chanting, but rather an art form that incorporates various precepts of Zen Buddhism into a kind of recited poetry.

See also:  Who Ate All The Pies Chant

Buddhist rituals and quasi-religious gatherings in Japan are frequently accompanied by songs about shiginand related behaviors.

See also

  • Pi-Yen Chen’s full name is Chen Pi-Yen (2010). Chants of Buddhist monks in China’s Tibet. A-R Editions, Middleton, Wisconsin, ISBN 9780895796721
  • Chen, Pi-yen, Middleton, Wisconsin, ISBN 9780895796721 (2002). “The modern practice of the Chinese Buddhist daily service: Two case studies of the traditional in a post-traditional environment” is the title of the paper. Ethnomusicology, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 226–249. JSTOR852780

Notes

  1. AbKhantipalo (1982, 1995)
  2. AbKhantipalo (1982, 1995)
  3. If you would like to view an example of Pali text and an English translation of this chant, read Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 1–2 for an example of Pali text. To hear this being recited in Pali by Venerable Indaratana Maha Thera, go to the following website: Abridged version of the text may be found at: abIndaratana Maha Thera (2002), pages. 1–2. Audio file can be found at: abIndaratana Maha Thera 2002, pp. 3–4. Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 5–6
  4. Audio file available at Audio file at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8.Audio file at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8.Audio file at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8. Thanisaro (1997) provides the text
  5. For more information, see See, for example, Indaratana (2002), pp. 32-34, for a multilingual edition of the book. To hear this being sung, go to the following website: On January 22, 2014, Cambodian Living Arts published “Smot Poetry Chanting.” The original version of this article was published on July 14, 2014. The Gtassara Sutta (A.iii.250) was retrieved on July 4, 2014, from the “Association for Insight Meditation” at the “Archived copy.” The original version of this article was published on November 21, 2007. Retrieved2007-11-09. CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. CS1 maint: archived copy as description (link)
  7. The Symbol and the Symbolized, by John Daido Loori, was published in 2007. Mountain Record: the Journal of a Zen Practitioner, Volume XXV (2). The original version of this article was published on November 15, 2010
  8. Yasuda, Joshu
  9. Anzan, Hoshin. “Gabyo: Painted Rice Cakes by Eihei Dogen Zenji” is the title of the exhibition. White Wind Zen Community is a Buddhist community in the United States. The original version of this article was published on March 7, 2008. Loori, John Daido (2008-03-26)
  10. Retrieved on 2008-03-26
  11. (1997). “Dharma Talk at the Zen Mountain Monastery.” ‘The Mountain Record’ is the journal of a Zen practitioner. On September 27, 2011, the original version of this article was archived.

References

  • AbKhantipalo (1982, 1995)
  • AbKhantipalo (1982, 1995)
  • Indiratana Maha Thera (2002), pages 1–2, provides an example of Pali text as well as an English translation of this chant. You may listen to this being sung in Pali by Venerable Indaratana Maha Thera by visiting the following website: Abridged version of the text can be found at: abIndaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 1–2. Abridged version of the text can be found at: ab Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 5–6
  • Audio file available at
  • Audio file available at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8.Audio file available at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8.Audio file available at: Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8. Thanisaro (1997) provides the text
  • For more reading, see See, for example, Indaratana (2002), pp. 32-34, for a multilingual edition of this work. To hear this being sung, go to the following website: 2014-01-22. “Smot Poetry Chanting.” Cambodian Living Arts. 2014-07-14 – The original version of this article may be seen here. A.iii.250) from the “Association for Insight Meditation” at “Archived copy” was retrieved on the 4th of July, 2014. A version of this article appeared on November 21, 2007, in the native language. Retrieved2007-11-09. maint: archived copy as title (link)
  • CS1 maint: archived copy as description (link)
  • The Symbol and the Symbolized, by John Daido Loori, 2007 Journal of the Zen Practitioner, Volume XXV of the Mountain Record (2). Anzan, Hoshin
  • Yasuda, Joshu (2010). Archived from the original on November 15, 2010. GABYO: Painted Rice Cakes by Eihei Dogen Zenji is a collection of paintings by Eihei Dogen Zenji on rice cakes. A Zen community among the White Winds. On the 7th of March, 2008, the original version of this article was retrieved. Loori, John Daido
  • Retrieved on 2008-03-26
  • (1997). It is titled “Dharma Talk from the Zen Mountain Monastery.” Journal of a Zen Practitioner’s Experiences on the Mountain Record On September 27, 2011, a copy of the original article was made available.

Why Do We Chant?

abKhantipalo (1982, 1995); abKhantipalo See Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 1–2 for an example of Pali text and an English translation of this chant. To hear this being recited in Pali by Venerable Indaratana Maha Thera, click to the following link: Audio file available at: abIndaratana Maha Thera (2002), pages. 1–2. Audio file available at: abIndaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 3–4. Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 5–6; audio file at; Audio file at; Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp. 7–8.Audio file at; Indaratana Maha Thera (2002), pp.

  • 7–8.
  • 32-34, for a multilingual version.
  • Web.
  • The Gtassara Sutta (A.iii.250) was retrieved on July 4, 2014, from the “Association for Insight Meditation” at “Archived copy.” On November 21, 2007, the original version of this article was archived.
  • CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link); CS2 maint: archived copy as description (link); The Symbol and the Symbolized, by John Daido Loori, published in 2007.
  • The original version of this article was published on November 15, 2010; Yasuda, Joshu; Anzan, Hoshin “Gabyo: Painted Rice Cakes by Eihei Dogen Zenji” is the title of this article.
  • On the 7th of March, 2008, the original version was archived.
  • “Dharma Talk at Zen Mountain Monastery.” Mountain Record: The Journal of a Zen Practitioner On September 27, 2011, the original version was archived.

Chanting and mantras – Ways of Buddhist living – Edexcel – GCSE Religious Studies Revision – Edexcel

The practice of chanting and the use of mantras are two methods of learning about and displaying dedication to Buddhist teachings. They are associated with meditation because they are yet another method of concentrating the mind. Chanting is the repetitive repetition of particular phrases over and over again.

Mantras are a type of statement that is repeated over and over again. Mayahana Buddhists, who use prayer beads known as malas, will occasionally chant mantras while doing so. The malas assist them in keeping track of the number of times they have recited the statement.

What do mantras contain?

The teachings of the Buddha, such as the Three Refuges or the Five Precepts, are frequently included in mantras. Buddhists use the Buddha’s teachings as mantras in an attempt to emulate the Buddha’s traits and, as a result, get closer to achieving enlightenment. Buddhism is a religion of the mind. Due to the large number of times Buddhists recite mantras, they typically memorize them by memory. Buddhists memorize these mantras and then pass them on vocally to others as part of their religious practice.

This mantra literally translates as “Look, the pearl in the lotus!” Occasionally, Buddhists will make use of a prayer wheel, which is spun around to display the prayers that will be repeated.

The Three Refuges are shown reverence by bowing three times in front of them.

Mahayana and Theravada mantras

Mahayana Buddhists chant a mantra known asNam Myoho Renge Kyo, which conveys the notion that everyone has the power to deal with and overcome any challenges that they meet in their lives, regardless of their religious affiliation. This notion implies that, as humans, we have the potential to change any pain into a state of non-suffering by utilizing our imagination. This is due to the fact that the Buddha was a human being who was able to gain enlightenment and put an end to the suffering he was experiencing in his life.

TheravadaBuddhists adhere to the teachings ofNamo Buddhaya.

The Sangha and the Dhamma are the other two places of refuge.

Chanting the Sutras

The Maha Prajna Paramita’s words are included here. Hrdaya Sutra (Hrdaya Sutra): When Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva practices the Prajna Paramita profoundly, he observes that the five skandhas are empty, and he is thus freed from all pain and distress, according to Buddhist tradition. Similarly, Shariputra, form is not distinguishable from emptiness, and emptiness is not distinguishable from form. That which is form is emptiness, and that which is emptiness is a state of being. The same may be said for sensations, perceptions, impulses, and awareness, among other things.

  • They never come or disappear, are never contaminated or pure, and never rise or decrease in number or quantity.
  • In the absence of the senses of sight and hearing; the absence of the senses of smell and taste; and the absence of the sense of touch; the absence of the senses; and so on until there is no realm of mind awareness; and so on until there is no realm of mind consciousness.
  • There is no suffering, there is no origination, there is no halting, there is no road, there is no knowledge, and there is also no accomplishment since there is nothing to attain.
  • Nirvana is a place where one may get away from any twisted viewpoint.
  • As a result, understand that Prajna Paramita is the great transcending mantra, is the great light mantra, is the ultimate mantra, is the supreme mantra, and that it is genuine, not false.
  • As a result, declare the Prajna Paramita mantra, specifically the mantra that says:

gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.

gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.

Chanting in Buddhsim

ThePractice of Chanting in BuddhismBhikkhu DhammasamiChantingis very common to any religion. Buddhism is no exception inthis regard. However, the aim and purpose of chanting is differentfrom one religion to another.Buddhism is uniquein that it does not consider chanting to be prayer.TheBuddha in many ways has shown us to have confidence in our ownaction and its results, and thereby encouraged us to dependon no one but ourselves. This in fact is the sum and substanceof His last message in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta. One of thepassages in this discourse reads: “Ananda, be dependenton yourself, take refuge in yourself and not in others, by thismean be dependent on the Dhamma, go for refuge to the Dhamma- the righteous principles”. Whena Buddhist does chanting, he is not asking some one to savehim from evil nor is he hoping to be given a place in heavenas a result after he dies. Instead, through chanting he maybelearning, teaching, philosophisingorre-memorisingthe discourse. Actually,in the Anguttara Nikaya there are some discourses dealing withchanting like Dhammavihari Sutta. It mentions five categoriesof people who make use of the discourses. Thefirst one studies it just for the sake of study without puttingit into practice or explaining it to others. He even does notreflect deeply on what he has studied. He is known as ‘Pariyatti-bahulo’who is keen on studying it alone. Thesecond one preaches or teaches what he has learnt from the discoursesbut does not follow it himself. He is ‘Pannyatti-bahulo’ whois keen only on teaching. Thethird one does chanting. He philosophises about the discourses,trying all the time to satisfy his philosophical thirst. Heforgets to make use of as mode or life. He is called ‘Vitakka-bahulo’who is eager only to indulge in philosophical aspects of theSuttas (Discourses). Thefourth one is the one who chants the discourses to make themlast for a long time in his memory. He memorises and re-memorises.Nevertheless, he does not go further to follow it in daily life.He is ‘Sajjhayaka-bahulo’ who is enthusiastic only in memorisingor chanting the teachings of the Buddha, He may even expectsome magical power from chanting. Thefifth and last one is who studies the discourses, teaches themto others, reflects on their philosophical points, chants themregularly and above all actually practices it in daily life.He is the one the Buddha praises to be ‘Dhammavihari’ – a practitionerof the Dhamma, which he has learnt from the discourses.Havingreflected on this Sutta, it is left to us to judge ourselvesto which category we belong and why we study or chant the discourses.Iwould like to dwell a bit more onchantingin general.This is, after all, an All-night Chanting ceremony. It is nothingbut right for us to be fully convinced of what we are doing.Initially I did mention that Buddhism is unique because it doesnot consider chanting to be a form of prayer.Thenwhy do we, Buddhists, chant?Inthe olden days, before there were sufficient support materialsfor study like books, translations and computers we had to memoriseto learn a discourse. After we had learnt it, we still had tochant regularly to protect it and hand it down to future generations.If we did not recite it daily we might forget it and omit somepart of it. The Anguttara Nikaya says thatif thediscourses are poorly maintained this will lead to the disappearanceof the Sasana.It was so important those daysto memorise and chant it regularly. This must have definitelycontributed in developing chanting practice. Chanting meantalmost for the survival of the Dhamma itself. Nowwe have sufficient support materials, why we should then bestill chanting? Is there any more reason to do this? Thereare some reasons sufficient to continue chanting practice. Regularchanting gives us confidence, joy and satisfaction, and increasesdevotion within us. This devotion is really a power. It is calledthe Power of Devotion (Saddhabala). It energises our life ingeneral. I do not know about the others. For me I often havea joyous feeling when the chanting goes right. I become moreconfident of myself. I see it as a part of developing devotion. InBuddhist monastic education tradition, chanting and learningby heart still forms a part of it. We study some of the TheravadaAbhidhamma texts -the highest teachings of the Buddha whichdeal with the ultimate nature of things- in that way inBurma. We are explained the meaning and how the logic developsin the Abhidhamma. In the night we try to chant without havinglearnt it by heart. We could do it because of the technique.It is known as evening-class (nya-war) over there. It meansa certain technique of studying the Abhidhamma and some of theSuttas. It is very helpful as it helps you to reflect very quickly. Whenwe examine the nature of the discourses, the reasons for chantingwill become clearer to us than ever.THENATURE OF THE DISCOURSESASutta (Discourse) likeMangala Suttawas an answer tothe Deva who asked the Lord Buddha about the real progress insocial, economic and spiritual life. It is the vision of theBuddha on those issues as much as his advice to all of us whogenuinely want those progresses in social and spiritual life.It is some thing that we should follow throughout our life startingfrom childhood to the day we take our last breath. Most of theSuttas are of this nature. They are descriptions as well asprescriptions for the common diseases like Lobha, Dosa and Moha(Greed, Hatred and Delusion). Anothernature of the discourses is protection or healing.RatanaSuttais one of the best-known examples here. It was firsttaught to Venerable Ananda who in turn chanted in Vaisali toward off all the evils and famine the people were then facing.Angulimala Suttaalso falls into this category as itrelieves the pains and trouble of a would-be mother.MahasamayaSuttaandAtanatiya Suttacome under the same categorybecause they emphasise much on protection and healing. Rememberthat Venerable Ananda and Venerable Angulimala did cultivatelove and compassion before they chanted the discourse for thisparticular kind of blessing. ThethreeBojjhanga Suttas(Maha Kassapa/Moggallana/Cunda)have been in common use to help relieve the suffering ofa patient. This is the third nature of the discourses I am tryingto understand and reflect. Eventhe Buddha asked Venerable Cunda to chant this Bojjhanga Suttawhen He was ill. He himself did the chanting of the BojjhangaSutta when his senior disciples, Venerable Maha Kassapa andVenerable Maha Moggallana, were sick. These are the kind ofSuttas that have both instructions for meditation practice andhealing power. Karaniyametta Sutta has these same natures: instructionfor daily practice to develop our spiritual benefit and to wardoff the evils. Inother words, Buddhist chanting serves as a reminder of the practicewe need to follow in daily life. If we understand and learnhow to do it properly, it is another type of meditation in itself.It is also at the same time a healing or blessing service. Thelast benefit we may get from chanting discourses is meditativeone. When we chant if we try to concentrate well on the chanting,our mind becomes contemplative, not wandering, not engagingin unwholesome thoughts. The late Venerable Dr. H. SaddhatissaMahanayaka Thero, the founder of SIBC, has rightly remarkedin his workthat almost all Buddhist practices are nothingelse but some form of meditation./.BhikkhuDhammasami, 1999


“Dve ‘me bhikkhave dhamma saddhammassa sammosaya antaradhanayasamvattanti. Katame dve. Dunnkikkhittam ca pada-byancanam atthoca dunnito.”Samyutta Nikaya, In theMahakassapa Sutta, theBuddha chanted the Sutta to ailing Venerable Maha Kassapa whilethe second to another patient, Venerable Maha Moggallana, Hisown chief disciple. In the Mahacunda-bojjhanga Sutta, VenerableCunda was asked by the Buddha who was then ill to chant (expound)the Bojjhanga. All were reported to have recovered at the endof the Sutta.Also Girimananda Sutta, Anguttara Nikaya;Girimanandabhikkhu was ill. That was reported to the Buddha by VenerableAnanda who was then taught this Sutta and asked to go back toGirimananda for expounding, reminding him of ten factors. Atthe end, he got recovered.Saddhatissa International Buddhist Centre. LondonFacets of Buddhism by Venerable H. Saddhatissa; World BuddhistFoundation, London, 1991; p. 267. Source:Nibbana.com,

Recite This Buddhist Chant to Calm Fears, Soothe Concerns

The Maha Prajna Paramita’s words are included in this collection. The Hrdaya Sutra is a Buddhist text that teaches on the importance of compassion. Because of his intense practice of the Prajna Paramita, Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva is able to discern that the five skandhas are empty, which allows him to be liberated from the effects of all sorrow and distress. If form is the same as emptiness, then emptiness is also the same as form, according to Shariputra. That which is form is emptiness, and that which is emptiness is a form of form.

  • All dharmas, Shariputra, are characterised by the presence of voidness.
  • As a result, there is no shape in emptiness, nor are there any sensations, perceptions, impulses, or conscious awareness there in.
  • Ignorance is not only absent, but it is also extinct; and so on till there is neither old age nor death, nor is either extinct.
  • With Prajna Paramita as his foundation, the Bodhisattva has no need for the mind, and with no mind, there are no anxieties.
  • Anuttara Samyak Sambodhi is achieved by all Buddhas in the three realms who are reliant on Prajna Paramita.
  • As a result, declare the Prajna Paramita mantra, specifically the mantra that reads:gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.
  • It starts with a gate.
  • It ends with a parasamgate.
  • it ends with a parasamgate…

20 Awesome Chants That Will Radically Improve Your Life

Chanting is a spiritual discipline that is supposed to improve listening skills, increase energy, and increase sensitivity toward others. Chanting is a form of meditation. The Benedictine Monks of Santo Damingo in Spain recorded a Gregorian chant CD that became a best-seller, and the practice acquired widespread acceptance as a result.

Chants may be used to convey dedication, appreciation, peace, compassion, and the desire for light to enter someone’s life. Chants can also be used to bring in light into someone’s life. Here are several chants that might help you live a better life.

Compassionate Buddha

It is the Compassionate Buddha’s “Om Mani Padme Hum,” which translates as “Hail to the gem in the lotus,” that is the most widely known chant in the world. It is the mantra of the Buddha of Compassion, also known as Goddess Kuan Yin in the Chinese tradition. Fears are calmed, anxieties are eased, and shattered hearts are healed with the mantra.

Amazing Grace of Sanskrit

The mantra “Om Namah Shivaya,” which was given the term “Amazing Grace of Sanskrit” by Elizabeth Gilbert, author of “Eat, Pray, Love,” translates as “I bow to Shiva, the greatest deity of change who represents, the truest, highest self.” According to Gilbert, the meaning of the phrase is “I revere the divinity inside myself.” This is meant to serve as a gentle reminder that everyone possesses divine energy and that everyone should be treated as if they are divine.

Happiness and Freedom

“Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu” is a phrase that is frequently connected with the Jivamukti Yoga School of meditation. According to the dictionary, it means: “May all creatures everywhere be happy and free; and may the thoughts. words. and acts of my own life contribute in some manner to that happiness and freedom for all.” It is a potent chant that emphasizes the importance of living one’s life as a servant to the greater good. Collaboration, compassion, and living in harmony with others, as well as with nature, are encouraged by the teachings of Buddhism.

Medicine Buddha Mantra

It is customary to say the mantra “Tayata Om Bekanze Bekanze Maha Bekanze Radza Samudgate Soha” to achieve prosperity and to assist erase troubles and suffering in the world. It is also said for healing and to help humans or animals at any time of day or night, even when they are in good health.

Mantra of Ganesh

The Ganesh Mantra is devoted to the Hindu god of knowledge and success, Ganesh, who is known for destroying all barriers in his path. “In Sanskrit, this phrase means “I bow down to the elephant-faced deity (Ganesh), who is capable of erasing all barriers.” I pray for blessings and safety for all of my loved ones.” When faced with a significant task or when traveling, the phrase can be extremely helpful.

Lakshmi Chant

“Om Shrim Maha Lakshmlyei Swaha,” which translates as “Om Shrim Maha Lakshmlyei Swaha,” is a greeting to the Hindu goddess of riches and prosperity, Lakshmi. A request for Lakshmi’s help in obtaining material prosperity and abundance is made in the chant.

Buddhist Money Mantra

It is a prayer to Vasudhara, the soil goddess, that the Buddhist money mantra “Om Vasudhare Svaha” is chanted. The chant should be recited 108 times in order to be blessed by the deities, who would then shower them with blessings and abundance.

Interview Chant

A good time to use this chant is when you are going on a job interview or making a proposal. The sentences were written in a formal manner “”Pravisi Nagar Kijal Sab Kaaja Hrudaya Rakhi Kosalpur Raja” translates as “I am entering the city for the purpose of carrying out my duties under the influence of Lord Ram.” May all of my projects and dreams come to fruition.” In addition, it may be utilized while entering an office building or the office of the person with whom you are scheduled to meet.

Mantra for Success

When you are unsure of which decision is best for your success, chanting can help you decide “I am your devotee,” says Jehi Vidhi Hoi Naath Hit Moraa Karahu, which translates as “O Lord, I am your devotee.” I’m at a loss on what to do. So you do whatever is in my best interests right away.” This mantra is claimed to open the door to prosperity if it is practiced with trust and reverence, and it is thought to be effective.

Manjushri Mantra

Chanting “Om a ra pa ca na dhih” will develop skills in all areas of learning, which is beneficial for individuals who desire to increase wisdom and improve abilities. The greater the amount of emphasis placed on the chant and the number of times it is repeated, the more likely it is to be successful.

Vajrapani

As the energy of an enlightened mind, Vajrapani is thought to be able to cut through illusion and free the chanter of hatred. It is for this reason that chanting “Om vajrapani hum” is claimed to be able to cut through delusion and liberate the chanter from hatred. The image of him dancing madly among flames is frequently used to symbolise metamorphosis. The chant assists in gaining access to surplus energy, and even the sound of the chant is energizing.

Peaceful Life

If you want to live a peaceful life, the mantra “Sarveshaam Svaastir Bhavatu, Sarveshaam Svaastir Bhavatu, Saveshaam Poornam Bhavatu, Sarveshaam Mangalam Bhavatu, Om Shanti, Shanti Shanteeh” is claimed to provide peace and calm. It is also said to bring prosperity. “May health flourish forever May peace abound forever May total plenty abound forever May auspiciousness abound forever Om Peace, Peace, Peace,” the phrase reads in English.

Health, Strength and Peace

Mantras may be utilized to bring health, power, and calm into one’s life in a variety of ways. The chanting of “Aham Aarogyam,” which translates as “I am healthy,” is claimed to bring health, while the addition of “Om Trayamabakam” is thought to provide health for a longer length of time. The mantra “Aham Brahmaasmi,” which translates as “I am God,” is recommended for gaining power, while the chant “Om Shanti Shanti Shanti” is recommended for gaining serenity.

Difficult Times

“Mookam karoti vaachaalam Pangum langhayatey girim Yatkripaa tamaham vandey Paramaananda Maadhavam” is supposed to be able to help the cripple climb mountains and the mute talk with great eloquence. When someone is in a tough position, the mantra begs for grace to help them get out of it more easily. I adore that Madhava, the source of Supreme Bliss, whose grace makes the deaf man able to speak and the cripple capable of crossing mountains.

Bhagvad Geeta Verse

When a bad circumstance gets even more challenging, the 15th verse of the 15th chapter of the Bhagvad Geeta is repeated to calm the mind. “Mattas smritir inaanama pochanamcha Sarvasya chaaham kridi sannivishto Mattas smritir inaanama pochanamcha Vedaishcha sarvaair ahameva vedyo Vedaanta krid veda videva chaaham Vedaanta krid veda videva chaaham “In the translation, Krishna states that He is seated in the hearts of all men and women, implying that someone who is causing you difficulty is aware of what you are going through as well as you are.

By putting your faith in a higher power, you may be assured that whatever is right will occur.

Seeking Success

Those wanting prosperity are advised to recite “Krishna Krishna Mahaayogin Bhaktaanaam Bhayankara Govinda Permaananda Sarvey Mey Vash Maanay,” which is a combination of the mantras Krishna, Govinda, and Permaananda. The translation requests that Krishna bestow Supreme Bliss upon you and that everything work in your favor. Prosperity is a chant that may be heard around the world. Each phrase of this chant incorporates the eight qualities of God, and the repetitions in each verse provide the strength needed to break down walls from the past and empower the individual singing.

Mukhunday, Mukhunday, Mukhunday Udharay Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, Aparay, A Har Har Har Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Hariong Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Nimamay, Nimamay, Nimamay, Nimamay, Nimamay, Nimamay The chanting of Akamay is a har har har har har har har har har har har”

Ancient Mantras

A simple chant, “Namo AmitaBha,” is intended to be an homage to Buddha; “Namo AmitaBha” pays tribute to the Buddha of Boundless Light, while “Ham-Sah” is a Hindu variation of the Buddhist phrase “I am that I am,” which means “I am.”

Amithaba

The chant Amithabha, which is the sacred mantra of Buddha, helps to increase compassion while also providing blessings to those who recite it often. It is said that by saying the mantra “om ami dewa hrih,” you would be safe from danger and impediments.

Green Tara Mantra

Physical, mental, and emotional blockages are frequently addressed with this mantra, but it may also be utilized to address blocks in interpersonal interactions. It is possible to release hope for a certain outcome and return the energy back to yourself by chanting “Om tare tuttare ture soha.” This will help you achieve inner calm and clarity.

Keeping the faith with chanting

During that time period, Kapur’s position as a reader of English literature at Miranda House, Delhi University, required her to contact with a large number of young ladies, many of whom were about the same age as her daughter. She began to fear these encounters as a result of them. She felt a cavernous emptiness within her, an emptiness that threatened to consume her entire being and existence. When a friend recommended that she attempt a sort of Buddhist chanting, she was a little skeptical.

  1. According to Kapur, who is now 70 years old, the individual who taught him to chanting came to his house every day for six months, every day of the year.
  2. In Nichiren Buddhism, this chant, which is spelled Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, is fundamental, and it is on this foundation that the present Soka Gakkai movement is built.
  3. It loosely translates as “devotion to the mystic law of the lotus blossom sutra” in English.
  4. Nichiren Buddhism does not need conversion because it is not a religious tradition.
  5. It is our practice, our way of life, that we are.
  6. We’ve never had a push for expansion before.
  7. Sumita Mehta is a writer and actress.

Several chanting groups gathered in high-rise buildings.

It drew the attention of housewives.

The bereaved and destitute Many BSG practitioners become involved with the organization as a result of a personal crisis.

BSG member Abhinav Purohit’s sister was going through a difficult time when she received an approach from a BSG member, according to Abhinav, a telecom strategy consultant in Dubai.

During the time when Rupkatha Bhowmick’s father was entangled in legal proceedings, a BSG member introduced her to the organization.

Dham, whose sister and daughter are also practitioners, had previously simply been a fan of the concept and not an active member until that point in his life.

“She was delirious and crazy,” says Ghosh of the woman’s condition.

“I didn’t have time to attend meetings, so they advised that I chant while working, and it resulted in a wonderful turnaround,” Ghosh explains.

Her confidence in the profession was strengthened as a result of these two developments.

“I consider myself to be a logical person.

When she got married, she had to resign from her position as YWD leader.

Throughout those days of uncertainty, Dham and her family chanted continuously.

“Doctors had warned me that things could get worse,” she explains further.

In addition to her mother, the 56-year-old resident of Sikandrabad claims that her family chanted for three other patients at the hospital who were in a similar state.

He goes on to say that he is a Hindu by faith and a Soka Gakkai Buddhist by practice, and that he visits temples on a regular basis.

“We’re not actively looking for the stray dog with a wound.” Mehta became a member of the practice when she was dealing with a variety of issues herself.

In her new role as a volunteer with the organization, she devotes the majority of her time.

The Indian chapter, which was established in 1986 and is a registered non-governmental organization, has grown from 4,000 members in 1997 to 150,000 members in 2016.

Mehta estimates that the current membership is slightly less than 200,000, though she is unsure of the exact number.

Ikeda, who is credited with spreading this belief system throughout the world, is a legendary figure.

Celebrities such as actress Tisca Chopra and fashion designer Rina Dhaka have embraced the practice in recent years.

Senior members of the organization have stated that they are wary of members who have political ties.

Neither the organization nor its members wish to be associated with any political ideology.

The group, says Mehta, “isn’t a cult or a religion.” “We are a practice, a way of life,” says the author.

We’ve never had a push for expansion before.

An issue that has been brought up against the group is that it has made little effort to reach out to people outside of India’s English-speaking upper middle class.

When Bhowmick was a district leader in Ballygunge, Kolkata, she brought this issue to the attention of the community.

Dham acknowledges that a lack of knowledge of spoken and written English may prevent him from attending BSG meetings, despite his having benefited from the philosophy in the past.

Translation into regional languages will require approval from SGI, and it is unlikely that this will happen unless there is a significant demand.

As Ghosh points out, “I’ve seen people bring up this issue at meetings several times, only to be told that if English is removed as a communication medium, the membership numbers will soar beyond BSG’s ability to accommodate them, and ‘we don’t want that’.” According to me, they require permission from SGI in order to translate into other languages.

SGI literature is widely translated into various languages outside of the United States.

Choose Life, one of them, has been translated into 28 other languages.

The philosophy of being a member A consensus has also emerged among members about the fact that recruiting of new members is not required for advancement within the group.

“In the previous 16-17 years, I’ve introduced only two people, and I’ve never been pressed by the organization to bring in new members, therefore I don’t believe evangelism is a part of BSG.” “I’ve never felt the need to beg my wife to practice Nichiren Buddhism, and I’ve never felt the need to force her to do so; it should come from inside.” Despite the fact that “no one really says you have to get in this many members,” adds Bhowmick, “it is considered as an achievement.” Purohit agrees with me.

The number of members is important to certain individuals, but leadership positions are not based on membership numbers, according to him.

Mehta categorically disputes this, and the same members assert that no such constraint exists at the present time.

According to Bhowmick, “during the years that I was extremely active, mostly between 2009 and 2012, I didn’t see any Muslim members in my district in Kolkata (in the Ballygunge region) or in Chittaranjan Park in Delhi (where she stayed for a spell),” Ghosh agrees with this.

“The Soka Gakkai is open to anybody,” says Mehta emphatically.

In addition, the group did not answer to queries on the number of members or the breakdown of members by gender.

Chanting is a form of meditation.

“It was contemporary medicine that assisted my kid in getting healthier, but the manner in which the transformation occurred was nearly supernatural.” Even physicians agreed that it was true.

Not every BSG member agrees with the organization’s ideology all of the time.

According to Bhowmick’s mother-in-law, for example, chanting might help her lose weight.

If someone is suffering from a mental health problem, we gently suggest them or their family to get the necessary treatment.” Bhowmick admires the theory, but he is dissatisfied with the organization, and he no longer attends meetings.

In Ghosh’s opinion, the incident was “inappropriate” and “ruffled some feathers.” She also began to feel a sense of intrusiveness towards him.

“But it was an odd thing for them to see frequent meetings at home and leaders stopping by unannounced to check on me.” Leadership in the BSG is responsible with the well-being of the individuals who are under their supervision.

Many people have found comfort.

Members disseminate the word in a subtle manner through Facebook groups, friends, and family, in search of hurting people in need of direction and assistance from others.

Over the years, it is claimed that BSG has attracted more female students than male students to its teachings.

Within chanting groups, close ties are developed between members.

“Experience sharing” sessions, according to Mehta, are designed to inspire individuals to discuss their own triumphs.

Visits to women’s homes are not permitted by male leaders without the presence of at least one other woman.

Note: Rupkatha Bhowmick is connected to the author, so please keep that in mind.) [email protected] To receive our newsletters, please provide a valid email address.

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