Why Do People Chant Defense At Basketball Games

Where Did the ‘DEE-FENSE’ Sports Chant Come From?

Many teams have distinctive rallying cries that help their fan bases stand out from the crowd. For example, dedicated New York Jets fans like showing off their spelling abilities by yelling “J-E-T-S. JETS! JETS! JETS!” during games. Home fans during Kansas Jayhawks games in the West chant the school’s well-known call to arms, ” Rock, Chalk, Jayhawk!” The Utah State basketball supporters’ favorite mass taunt is a little more stinging in its delivery. An upset victory against the visiting team—whoever they are or whatever they are doing—is followed by the local fans raising their voices together in a savage, multi-part jeer known as ” Winning Team, Losing Team.” Of course, not all chants are distinctive to a certain club.

A fascinating narrative can be found in the case of that team, which featured a top-tier football lineup and a great baseball facility.

The G-Men were a dominant force in the NFL during their early years there.

Three future Hall of Famers were among those who competed for the team: Sam Huff, Emlen Tunnell, and Andy Robustelli.

  • Much to the dismay of Gotham sports fans, the Giants failed to win any of those championship games, with the exception of the very first one.
  • The squad then went on to win the NFL championship game, which they won 47-7 over the Chicago Bears, in large part because of their outstanding defense.
  • Another noteworthy aspect of the 1956 New York Giants season is that it was their first season in the National Football League.
  • Considering that these were, by all accounts, the two strongest teams in the NFL’s Eastern Conference, the clash had a lot riding on it at the time.
  • Late in the game, as Chicago was moving down the field, the New York supporters attempted to instill some confidence in their team’s defensive line.
  • Dee-Fense!” (Defense!
  • This quickly established itself as a standard at Giants home games.

Furthermore, they would repeat the remark if visiting guests appeared to be about to cause problems.

There was nothing you could hear.” Good chants have the potential to spread.

In 1969, the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association (NBA) were a championship-caliber, defensive-minded club, much like Howell’s Giants had been before them.

It was frequently accentuated with handclaps in this setting, leading to the development of a now-popular upgrade that sounds like this: “Dee-fense!” (Applause!

Applause!

During the 1970s, it was commonly used at Pittsburgh’s Three Rivers Stadium, where the Steelers rode their feared “Steel Curtain” defense to four Super Bowl triumphs.

The New Orleans Saints were greeted at the Moissant Airport by 3,000 NOLA supporters who chanted “Dee-Fense!” over and over following an upset away victory over Washington in 1979.

Props are increasingly being used as well.

Exactly where this pun-derful tradition began is still up in the air.

As an example, in Seattle, Seahawks super fanLorin “Big Lo” Sandretzkylikes to substitute a cutout of the word “Sea” for the letter “D.” Do you understand what I’m saying? ” Sea-Fence!” exclaims the narrator. It’s all quite amusing.

NBA: The Top 10 Most Annoying Things About NBA Games

  1. In many ways, attending a college basketball game is a more thrilling experience than attending a game in the National Basketball Association, particularly when it comes to the NBA’s regular season matchups. I really want to enjoy watching NBA games as much as I like watching college basketball. It stands to reason that, given how much I enjoy watching college basketball, I would find games between NBA teams to be equally as entertaining. To be sure, both organizations hold year-end tournaments to determine the final winner
  2. It’s just a shame that the NBA’s version isn’t the 68-team, single-elimination format that the NFL uses. Because of the lockout, the NBA is forced to play a shortened schedule, and I’ve chosen to give the organization a second shot. So far this season, despite my high hopes that the NBA will provide me with anything exciting, I haven’t found much to be enthusiastic about. Aspects of an NBA game that appear to me to be less appealing than the high-intensity games played in the NCAA appear to be the dribbling and passing. Here are the top reasons why the NBA has a propensity to irritate rather than delight, whether I’ve witnessed them this season or am referring to features of the game I’ve witnessed in years past… In the event that you’re an NBA fanatic, you could wish to keep your eyes closed. However, if you’re David Stern, you might want to take some notes here.)
  1. In contrast to the NCAA, it appears that NBA games are activities that take place in the background, since the audience appears to be never really engaged in the proceedings. It’s almost as though the audience would rather be someplace else unless the game is tied with two minutes left to play in regulation. Even though the home team is down by 18 points in the third quarter, the fact that the musical stylings of Cee-Lo Green are being broadcast over the stadium’s loudspeakers just adds to the confusion among the general public as to what is going on. When compared to the NCAA, where the student section generally keeps the crowd volume under control, the NBA crowd is more depressing than anything else.
  1. An NBA game’s public address announcer’s repeated chant of “DE-FENSE” (clap-clap) “DE-FENSE” (clap-clap) “DE-FENSE” (clap-clap) “DE-FENSE” (clap-clap) “DE-FENSE” (clap-clap) serves as a reminder to the audience that the home team’s defensive possession requires a boost from the crowd. Furthermore, the fact that virtually no one in the audience is paying attention to his instructions does nothing to aid the NBA’s position.
  1. When it comes to watching an NBA game, floor seats are usually ideal for one thing: accidental humor. Never in a million years would you see “that man” at an NCAA basketball game. When the NBA playoffs come around and court side seats are available for $450, he will make every effort to attend the game in his floral-patterned button-down shirt and designer trousers. And just to make things even more interesting, he’s the man who sits directly behind the team bench, peeking his head into the huddle while the coach draws an inbounds play, ready to make a proposal if the coach decides to ask him for guidance. The rowdy student section is preferable than “that man” any day of the week.
  1. To their credit, Miami was the first to institute this heinous “custom” of providing each fan their own t-shirt to wear throughout the game and/or a towel to wave during timeouts and free throw attempts. The majority of home clubs have taken it upon themselves since 2006 to dress and embellish their fans in apparel and accessories that are based on a common theme. When compared to a student section wearing similar t-shirts, giving matching t-shirts to a whole NBA audience makes it appear as though supporting for the home team is a compulsory activity. In 2011, Memphis Grizzlies supporters were required to wear white t-shirts with the motto “Believe Memphis” for each home game, which was a first in the NBA. Because if you have to be persuaded to believe in your team during the playoffs, it is likely that you shouldn’t be attending any of the games in the first place.
  1. Because the fans in the finest seats frequently do not arrive at the game until long after it has begun, NBA games appear to be more like markers of a fan’s social standing than they do sports competitions. When you turn on the television to watch an NBA game, you’re disappointed to see the arena half-empty at tip-off. It should draw enthusiastic crowds, or at the very least people that arrive on time, because the NBA is the world’s greatest display of professional basketball
  2. As such, it should draw enthusiastic crowds. In contrast, the NCAA basketball audiences begin to fill their seats many hours before the start of the match. That home court advantage is nearly a million times more important in college games than in the NBA should come as no surprise.
  1. Although they are more evident during the playoffs, television timeouts may derail any NBA game’s flow. There is no doubt that the television networks are more interested with stuffing as many ads as possible down the throats of NBA viewers than they are with presenting the on-court product. And if it has an adverse effect on the game itself, that is just a risk that the networks are ready to accept. Since each NBA game consists of 48 minutes of playing time and 198 minutes of downtime (which includes commercials, promos, and talking heads), it seems that way.
  1. Because of the way the conventional NBA game is structured, defense isn’t required until the fourth quarter—and even then, only if the score is still somewhat close at the time. Isn’t it reasonable for players to want to play their best defense all of the time? At the very least, it would put an end to the entire “NBA games aren’t entertaining until the final two minutes” debate.
  1. However, despite the fact that it is theoretically a team sport, the NBA may occasionally lend itself to a more personalized style of play. The NBA’s isolation offense, in contrast to the team-oriented strategy that is employed at the university level, is frequently presented to fans as basic. When compared to the “me-first” type of offense that is prevalent in the NBA, college offenses are more focused on team play. In the NBA, this “clear-out” offensive consists of a player demanding the ball and then gesturing his teammates away from the court. (This is good
  2. He doesn’t require any assistance.) Following that, the attacking player seeks to take his defender on one-on-one, which is extremely frustrating to watch when the other player isn’t interested in anything other than his own numbers.
  1. When the coach is explaining what has to be completed on the court, does it not appear like the players on the bench are looking everywhere but at the coach? Perhaps this is because I’m on the lookout for reasons to discredit the NBA as a must-see athletic entertainment event. Perhaps this is why I’m not a professional basketball coach: why would I want to waste my time ranting and drawing plays if no one is even paying attention to what I’m doing? I’m simply putting it out there.
  1. This is likely the most significant deterrent when it comes to determining whether or not to commit to the NBA as a prospective nightly television commitment for the casual fan. Simply said, it is discouraging to witness a player obviously not attempting to win a game while playing. Because of the absurd sums of money the players are earning, calculating their hourly rates is a mind-boggling exercise—especially if the methodology is based on hours in which a player genuinely exerts effort to assist his team win

Crowd Chants for Basketball

  • Photographs from a cheer camp
  • Cute cheers and chants for kids football pom pom cheerleaders
  • Cheers for high school basketball

Using any of these and incorporating it into your cheer is a relatively straightforward procedure, which can be accomplished by either writing out the entire word or taking just the initial letter and repeating it with claps a few times before yelling out the entire word: D (clap) D (clap) D (clap) DEFENSE is a verb that means “to defend” (clap clap) In keeping with the fact that chants will be more recalled if they have rhythm and rhyme to them, developing simple phrases to go along with the sound of the letters may be quite effective: “S (clap-clap) C (clap-clap) O (clap-clap)” (clap) R is an abbreviation for Robert (clap) E!

  • Score your way all the way to Vic-to-ry!
  • Aside from that, it has harsh consonants, which are more effective in the terrible acoustics of a gymnasium.
  • Setting up a rhythm of call and response with a group of people is a great approach to get them very pumped up.
  • What we’re all about should be shouted out!
  • Fighting, Spartans!
  • Win, Spartans, win!
  • The crowd chants, “WIN, SPARTANS, WIN!” Consider spending the time leading up to the game brainstorming the cheer variants that you’ll teach the audience, but don’t be afraid to draw inspiration from the game itself while creating your cheers as well.
  • When a throng of people is applauding for a team, nothing is more motivating than that, which is why cheerleaders are so important to the sport.
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The History of the “Air Ball” Chant, the Greatest Taunt in Sports

Durham, North Carolina – On March 5, 2016, students from the Duke Blue Devils and Cameron Crazies prepare for their upcoming game versus the University of North Carolina Tar Heels. Photograph by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images Josh Levin revealed the tale of the “air ball” chant on a special edition of Slate’s sports podcast Hang Up and Listen this week, which aired this week. The audio version, which includes interviews with North Carolina basketball player Rich Yonakor and Duke supporter James Armstrong, may be listened to by clicking on the player below this paragraph, and you can subscribe to Hang Up and Listen on iTunes by clicking on the button below this paragraph.

unsporting behavior” during school-sponsored events.

The WIAA attempted to retract that email a short time later, claiming that “the objective of the communication was misinterpreted and mutated into something way beyond what it was and what it was intended for.” The WIAA’s initial communication, if this is the case, did a terrible job of distinguishing between the two situations.

“Sieve, sieve, sieve” is a phrase that is very hard to chant in a harmonic manner.

But “air ball, air ball, air ball” is a chant in its own right.

For example, in this 2010 game, Maryland supporters jeered Clemson’s Trevor Booker with a succession of forceful staccato bursts, like in the following example: On other situations, it might come out as dismissive, even contemptuous, like in this rendition by the University of Central Florida’s student section: What I believe to be the iconic air-ball chant is included in the second video.

This is a lovely and remarkable event to witness in person.

Heaton, stated that “without direction, instruction, or the presence of a conductor or a pitch pipe, thousands of strangers, massed in indoor stadiums and arenas, are capable of chanting “Air ball,” in total and rhythmic unison if stimulated by an air ball.” A piece about the phenomena published by the Associated Press stated that the professor’s “study has yielded no clues as to how or why this unique athletic event occurs.” That is not entirely correct.

The origins of this intriguing sports occurrence are still a mystery to us, although we do have some ideas.

The California Golden Bears scored four goals in a row by launching air balls into an orange hoop that might have been painted invisible.” As the writer continued his analysis of the situation, he pointed out that Cal State’s issues went beyond merely shooting basketballs that did not make it to the hoop.

  • It will come as no surprise to find that air-ball-lofting is a thing.
  • After traveling south to Santa Cruz in 1968—”John Wittman picked off an air ball of teammate Mike Compton,” wrote theSanta Cruz Sentinel—the word found its way to the East Coast in 1971, arcing into publications such as theBennington Banner of Vermont.
  • Anthony.
  • The Cameron Crazies, the venerable student section of Duke University, claims credit for inventing the air-ball chant, a self-congratulatory assertion that is consistent with the culture of Duke basketball fans in general.
  • Duke defeated the North Carolina Tar Heels 47–40 on February 24, 1979, a game that would have been a minor footnote in the history of the rivalry if it had not been for the odd halftime score of Duke 7, UNC 0 at the time of the game.
  • Under the direction of Dean Smith, North Carolina frequently employed an attacking concept known as the four corners.
  • The four corners were occasionally used by teams to bleed the clock down to zero in the days before the shot clock was introduced.

Let’s go back to the 1979 game between Duke and North Carolina, which took place in Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.

Rich Yonakor, who was a forward and center for the Tar Heels during that season, recalls Smith addressing the squad after a practice session ended.

‘We’ll take away their fans’ passion for the game, and we’ll take away their players’ enthusiasm for themselves.’ That would be something to do to quiet the mob, wouldn’t it?

It was something we had never considered before, and so we all agreed that it would be “very great” if it happened.

After then, North Carolina maintained possession of the ball.

And then hung on to it.

Nothing.

Nothing has changed.

“It was a little irritating,” he recalls of the experience.

That’s exactly what we did intermittently throughout the first half.” Duke ultimately gained possession of the ball and converted a free throw to establish a commanding 3–0 lead.

“I had grabbed the ball in the corner, and in this specific instance, I was down in the left corner of the baseline on the baseline.” “And yeah, that hoop looked pretty fantastic, it seemed like it was extremely large,” Yonakor adds of the hoop.

“It was a terrific shot, it was exactly on line, but it was an eight-foot shot, and I shot it from 14 feet,” I’ve told people over the years.

While watching the video above, you can hear a thunderous applause from the audience and the announcer proclaiming, “Boy, he got nothing but air.” It’s unlikely that anyone in the audience will be yelling “air ball,” yet it is possible.

The Cameron Crazies chanted “air ball” on that particular day, according to players from that Duke squad, including All-American Jim Spanarkel of the Blue Devils and Kenny Dennard, the man who snatched Yonakor’s air ball.

As for Yonakor’s failed shot, there is contemporaneous non-partisan proof that, at the very least, he was mocked for it, with the Washington Post stating on March 4, 1979, that he “earned the nickname’Airball’ for an airball he tossed up during Duke’s recent victory against Carolina.” It wasn’t just Duke athletes and Duke alumni who heard the chant “air ball, air ball, air ball” on that day; everyone heard it.

  • Rich Yonakor feels the same way.
  • In fact, “they were the ones who came up with the idea of calling out the name ‘air ball.'” Listed below is my interpretation of what transpired.
  • The majority of loyal supporters will not immediately slam a player who misses the rim.
  • Air ball!” every time he touches the ball, which will make him seem foolish.
  • On the other hand, Kenny Dennard, the Duke player who came up with the offensive rebound after Yonakor’s miss, has shared recordings of the play on YouTube and Vimeo.
  • According to Yonakor’s account, the Cameron Crazies began playing “air ball” the next time he touched the ball, rather than immediately after he missed the ball.
  • He claims that the “air ball” slogan was not invented by the Cameron Crazies.

He went to Mendham High School in Mendham, New Jersey, and he believes the slogan originated from the rival team’s fans because the Mendham squad was a complete disaster at the time.

On February 24, 1979, a group of Duke supporters came up with a new cadence for an old chant.

It is acceptable to call someone a “air ball.” That particular rhythm is what distinguishes it as the ideal basketball taunt.

In the finals of the 1979 ACC Tournament, he scored 10 points as UNC defeated Duke 71-63 in the championship game.

He says he’s satisfied with how his career has turned out and that he’s not the least bit resentful of being connected with a shot that soared several feet beyond the rim.

However, this does not imply that he is eager to participate in the “air ball” chant himself. “I’ve never chanted it before,” Yonakor confesses, “so I’m not sure how to perform it.” More coverage of the 2016 NCAA Tournament can be found at Slate.com.

Traditions

Offense for the MUSS football team: When the Utes are on offense, the MUSS is quite silent! We want our squad to remain focused on the game and not be distracted by anything else. When the Utes are on defense, they should make as much noise as they possibly can! We aim to throw the opposition team off their game and cause its members to lose their focus. On third down, the MUSS jumps around and creates as much noise as possible to discourage the opposition team from converting the opportunity.

  1. First Down Chant: When the Utes gain their first down, all members of the MUSS raise their hands in unison and exclaim “First down!” When you cry “First down,” point your arm in the direction of the first down, as if you were a referee, to demonstrate your intent.
  2. Bend your middle and ring fingers and hold them together with your thumb to form a U shape.
  3. MUSS will hang a “five” in front of the student section if the opposing team earns a false start penalty, signaling that the team has been penalized five yards.
  4. Tailgates at the Eccles Tennis Center: The MUSS hosts a tailgate on the field immediately north of the Eccles Tennis Center before every home football game (located on Guardsman Way).
  5. Every tailgate includes a chance to win two sideline passes through a raffle.
  6. Singing the song “Utah Man:” Whenever the Utah Utes score a touchdown or make a field goal, the band will play the school fight song, “Utah Man,” to celebrate the victory.
  7. Interaction between the MUSS and the player: After the game, the players and coaches will congregate in front of The MUSS and sing the school fight song, “Utah Man,” as a show of solidarity.

Basketball at MUSS If you want to make a free throw for Utah, you should place your thumbs together and extend both pointer fingers, creating the shape of a “U.” As soon as a free throw is made, the crowd should cheer and pound their feet, chanting “Utes”3-Point Jump”.

UTAH MAN is an abbreviation for Utah Man.

Our group of friends is the most jovial you have ever witnessed.

Our shout may be heard resonating across the mountains, both close and distant.

asks the chorus.

I am a Utah Man/Fan, sir, and will remain so till the day I die; Ki-yi!

So fill your lungs with air, sing it out loud, and shout it to the skies, for we’ll battle for dear old Crimson, and I’m a Utah Man, and I’ll fight for you.

GO UTES!

When we approach the avenue, all lined up in a row, arm in arm, and step in time as we make our way down the street (this is usually not sung at games) No matter if we’re dressed in freshmen green or in a senior gown, everyone agrees that we’re the friendliest bunch in the community.

And, when our college days are up and the night is drawing near, we’ll sing that song one last time: “A Utah Man Am I,” with our last breath. GO UTES! GO UTES! GO UTES!

7 Reasons that Defense Wins Games and Should Be Your Priority — Can You Come Up With More Reasons?

Offense in MUSS football: When the Utes are on offense, the MUSS is quite silent! In order for our squad to be successful, they must be completely focused on the game at hand. When the Utes are on defense, they should make as much noise as they possibly can. We aim to throw the opposition team’s members off their game and cause them to lose their composure. MUSS jumps around and creates as much noise as possible when the opposition side is down by three points on a third down. Aim to cause the opposition team to commit a false start as many times as possible throughout the game.

  • U chop: When the band is performing a percussion song, all MUSS members join their hands together to form a “U” and “chop” in time with the song.
  • Your pointer finger and pinkie finger should remain straight throughout the exercise.
  • Throughout the season, a running total will be maintained, and a line of “fives” will be located just in front of The MUSS area.
  • All MUSS members are entitled to free meals.
  • The winners of these passes will have the opportunity to sit on the sidelines for the whole game.
  • As soon as the Utah Utes score a touchdown or make a field goal, the school’s fight song, “Utah Man,” will be played by the band.
  • Interaction between MUSS and the player: After the game, the players and coaches will congregate in front of The MUSS and sing the school fight song, “Utah Man,” as a show of support.
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Athletes from the University of Southern California (MUSS) Throw up your U: When the University of Utah makes a free throw, you place your thumbs together and extend both pointer fingers, forming the letter U.

When the Utes make a three-point shot, leap and holler until the Utes receive the ball back in their possession..

verse:I am a Utah man/fan, sir, and I reside across the green from you on the other side of the world.

The caliber of our pupils is unsurpassed, and each and every one of them is a bright light.

“Who am I, sir?” the chorus asks the audience.

My loyalties lie with the state of Utah and will continue to do so until my death; Ki-yi!

We’ll battle for dear old Crimson, for I’m a Utah Man.

A big shout-out to the University of Utah Thunderbirds!

Chorus Although we may not be able to live forever on this jolly good old planet, we will make the most of our time here by spreading joy and happiness to everyone we come in contact with.

In the end, when our college days are through and the night is drawing near, we’ll sing that song with our last breath: “I Am a Utah Man.” A big shout-out to the University of Utah Thunderbirds!

  1. It is something that you (coaches) can influence. On the basketball floor, defense is something that can be more readily controlled. However, while you cannot always control how many three-point attempts are made and whether they go in, you can control the intensity, effort, and execution of your basketball defense. The NCAANBA Champions Play Outstanding Defense When you stop to think about it, practically every championship basketball team at the collegiate and professional levels had a strong man-to-man defense to their credit. Simply look at the previous nine NBA winners and their opponents’ PPP (Points per Possession) and you will see what I mean:
  • 2012 – Miami Heat finished fourth in the regular season and fifth in the playoffs. The Dallas Mavericks finished seventh in the regular season and ninth in the playoffs in 2011. 2010 – Los Angeles Lakers finished 5th in the regular season and 7th in the playoffs
  • 2009 – Los Angeles Lakers finished 5th in the regular season and 2nd in the playoffs. The Boston Celtics finished second in the regular season and second in the playoffs in 2008. The San Antonio Spurs finished first in the regular season and fourth in the playoffs in 2007. The Miami Heat finished 10th in the regular season and 2nd in the playoffs in 2006. The 2005 San Antonio Spurs finished third in the regular season and second in the playoffs
  • The 2004 Detroit Pistons finished first in the regular season and first in the playoffs.

When it came to defense, all of the clubs were among the best in the NBA. The winners from 2010 and 2011 were the only two teams to not have an outstanding defense in their respective seasons. However, they were still really excellent defenses, and you would have noted that their three-point field goal defense was among the best in the league (1st and 3rd). The last five men’s NCAA Division I college champions are listed below. This is according to Ken Pomeroy’s modified Defensive Efficiency, which was estimated earlier.

  • In terms of defense, all of the clubs were among the best in the NBA. The winners from 2010 and 2011 were the only teams to not have an exceptional defense. Their defenses, on the other hand, were VERY excellent, and you would have noted that their three-point field goal defense was among the best (1st and 3rd). The last five men’s NCAA Division I college champions are as follows: 1. Those are the results of Ken Pomeroy’s modified Defensive Efficiency calculation. Due to the fact that the NCAA has roughly 350 teams, all of these teams are ranked in the top 95 percentile of all teams in the nation.
  1. *** We did not include women’s statistics since they were more difficult to get
  2. The Most Efficient Way for You to Become Competitive Developing a strong defense, in addition to recruiting players, is the most expedient method of building a competitive squad for you. In order to do this, many coaches place a strong emphasis on defense at the start of the season and work hard to strengthen it as fast as possible. They are well aware that you can acquire excellent defensive abilities far more quickly than you can develop attacking ones. Defense is something that everybody can do. Provides Consistency in your life When you have a horrible shooting night, defense will keep you in the game. Excellent defensive play creates easy offensive opportunities. Fast break is one of the most effective methods of converting easy baskets. What causes people to take quick breaks? Rebounds and turnovers on the defensive end. As a result, it makes little difference whether you are a pressing team that induces more turnovers or a pack-line defense that forces disputed outside shots that result in rebound opportunities. Playing excellent defense will result in increased offensive production. Defensive rebounding is improved when the defense is tough. In order to properly box out, your players must be consistently beat off the dribble and be out of position defensively at all times. There are now more clear lanes for offensive players to go freely down the court and score easy baskets while drawing little attention to themselves on the defensive end of the court. It is more likely that players will restrict the dribble and rotate swiftly to the right defensive position if they do so. This will result in more defensive rebounds, which equals less points for your opponent and more points for you via fast breaks. Anyone Can Participate in Defense No matter how few football players are available for your club, you can still compete and educate those young players how to play defense in a competitive environment. By concentrating on defense, you can take role players with little or no skill and allow them to contribute to the team. As a coach, this provides you with a great deal of versatility.

Because women’s statistics were more difficult to get, we did not include them. It is the most efficient method of being competitive. Developing a strong defense, in addition to recruiting players, is the most expedient method of building a competitive squad quickly. Thus, many coaches place an emphasis on defense at the start of the season and work hard to build it as rapidly as they can for their teams to succeed. You can learn to play excellent defense far more quickly than you can learn to play excellent offense.

  1. Consistency is provided.
  2. Defensive dominance results in abundant opportunities for offensive success When it comes to scoring easy baskets, fast break is one of the most effective methods of doing so.
  3. Rebounds and turnovers on the defensive end In other words, it makes no difference whether you play press defense and force more turnovers or pack-line defense and force disputed outside shots, which results in more rebounds.
  4. Defensive rebounding is enhanced by aggressive defense.
  5. There are now more open lanes for offensive players to go freely down the court and score easy baskets while drawing fouls.
  6. This will result in more defensive rebounds, which equals less points for your opponent and more points for you on fast breaks.
  7. No matter how few football players are available for your club, you can still compete and educate those young players how to play defense in a positive environment.
  8. As a coach, this provides you with a great deal of freedom.

Defense Resources

Jim Huber’s Defense of the Individual Using Don Kelbick’s Match Up Zone Defense, you can win more games. The 2-3 Zone Defense of Al Marshall

Crowd Basketball Chant Sound Effect – 24 Sound Effects

1
Crowd,Chant,Defense,MedDi.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chant Defense MedDi i 2.0 1:07

Crowd Basketball Chant

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Crowd,AHH,Chant,Defense.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd AHH Chant Defense i 2.0 0:13 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
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Crowd,Chants,Eratic,Defen.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chants Eratic Defen i 2.0 1:00 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Ovation,UTEP,Chant.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Ovation UTEP Chant i 2.0 0:15 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chant,Defense,Angry.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chant Defense Angry i 2.0 0:24 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,AHH,Chant,Defense,2.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd AHH Chant Defense 2 i 2.0 0:36 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chants x2,Applaudx2.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chants X2 Applaus x2 i 2.0 1:19 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Hecklers,Chant,Dist.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Hecklers Chant Dist i 2.0 0:42 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Team,Chant,Claps,Wo.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Team Chant Claps Wo i 2.0 1:11 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chant,UTEP,Ohhhh.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chant UTEP Ohhhh i 2.0 0:28 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Distant,Chant,Defen.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Distant Chant Defen i 2.0 0:24 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Idle,Chant,CHS.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Idle Chant CHS i 2.0 0:25 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chant,Clap,UTEP.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chant Clap UTEP i 2.0 0:18 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chants,Claps,Buzzer.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chants Claps Buzzer i 2.0 0:48 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Chant,UTEP,Short.wav Crowd, Basketball: Basketball,Crowd Chant UTEP Short i 2.0 0:08 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Game,Voices,Drum,Chant.wav Crowd, Basketball: Crowd,Game,Voices,Drum,Chant i 2.0 0:18 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
Crowd,Sports,Small,Chant,Clap,Marty Collins.wav Crowd, Basketball: Crowd Sports Small Chant Clap Marty Collins i 2.0 0:08 Crowd Crowd Basketball Chant
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Listen to Grizzlies’ fans chanting ‘DE-FENSE’ with a 78-point lead

When the Memphis Grizzlies are up 78 points on the Oklahoma City Thunder, their supporters screaming “DE-FENSE” is exactly the sort of natural pettiness that all NBA fans crave in their hearts. As a result of theMemphis Grizzlies’ 78-point drubbing of the Oklahoma City Thunder on Thursday night, its supporters were spiteful enough to tweak the team’s “DE-FENSE” chant late in the fourth quarter while the team was ahead. Memphis has a reputation to preserve, and it does it admirably. This is the house that Grit ‘N Grind designed and constructed.

In the process, Memphis improved its record to 12-10, while rebuilding Oklahoma City plummeted to 6-16 on the season.

How will OKC ever be able to recover? Once in a while, a box score will be shown in the NBA that does not appear to be feasibly feasible, and this was one of those box scores on Thursday night.

Memphis Grizzlies fans chant “DE-FENSE” while already up 78 points

While the Grizzlies deserve praise for putting on their most dominant performance of the season, it’s difficult to understand how a club like the Thunder can lose by 73 points. For starters, don’t score more than 26 points in a quarter on offense and allow the opposition to put at least 31 points in the basket in every quarter. Score fewer than 20 points in a quarter twice, and allow 41 points in a quarter twice, and you’re done. Overall, Memphis is the No. 5 club in the Western Conference after 22 games, while Oklahoma City is the No.

While the Grizzlies should be a playoff club and the Thunder are clearly in rebuilding mode, no one could have predicted the lopsided nature of the game that took place at FedEx Forum on Friday night.

A 73-point victory over the Dallas Mavericks on Saturday night is virtually impossible for Memphis.

Music at sporting events – Wikipedia

While the Grizzlies deserve praise for putting on their best performance of the season, it’s difficult to understand how a club like the Thunder can lose by 73 points in the first place. Start by never scoring more than 26 points in a quarter on offense, and allow the opponent to score at least 31 points through the hoop throughout each quarter. Just two quarters of scoring fewer than 20 points in a quarter followed by two quarters of allowing 41 points, and you’re done. The Memphis Grizzlies are the No.

12 club in the same conference after the same number of games.

The magnitude of this disaster may be unprecedented.

History of music at sporting events

While the Grizzlies deserve praise for putting on their best performance of the season, it’s difficult to understand how a club like the Thunder can lose by 73 points. For starters, never score more than 26 points in a quarter on the offensive end, and allow the opposition to put at least 31 points in the basket in every quarter. Score fewer than 20 points in a quarter twice and allow 41 points in a quarter twice, then you’re done. Overall, Memphis is the No. 5 club in the Western Conference after 22 games, while Oklahoma City is the No.

Even though the Grizzlies should be a playoff club and the Thunder are clearly in rebuilding mode, no one could have predicted the blowout outcome of the game at FedEx Forum.

It is a given that the Memphis Grizzlies will not defeat the Dallas Mavericks by 73 points on Saturday.

Music used for dramatic effect

While the Grizzlies deserve praise for their most dominant performance of the season, it’s difficult to understand how a club like the Thunder can lose by 73 points. For starters, never score more than 26 points in a quarter on the offensive end, and allow the opponent to knock at least 31 points through the hoop in every quarter. You need to score fewer than 20 points in a quarter twice and allow 41 points in a quarter twice, and you’re done. Overall, Memphis is the No. 5 team in the Western Conference after 22 games, while Oklahoma City is in 12th position after the same number of games.

There may never be another explosion quite like this one. It is a given that the Memphis Grizzlies will not defeat the Dallas Mavericks by 73 points on Saturday night.

Association of songs with sporting events

Historically, several songs have been connected with specific athletic events such as football games. The losing visitors to collegiate sporting events may be serenaded by the host team’s fans with a song recorded by Steam, named “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye,” which has the common chorus, “na na, goodbye, goodbye, farewell, goodbye,” throughout the second half of the game. The Queen classics ” We Will Rock You ” and ” We Are the Champions “, as well as Five Stone’s “Make Noise,” Gary Glitter’s ” Rock and Roll Part 2 “, and Zombie Nation’s “Kernkraft 400 “, have all become staple fare during sports events.

Basketball music

At important moments in NBA games, repetitious organ music is played to set the tone for the game. When the home team enters the visitor’s side of the court with control of the ball, for example, the announcers frequently play the ” Charge ” fanfare to follow them. A new tune is utilized to motivate the home team to defend their own half of the court.. To accompany the home team hitting the court to open the game, several NBA teams now play a specific theme that is accompanied by music. They also employ chants, such as the defense chant, to demonstrate their support and to energise the audience members.

Both Michigan State University and the University of Kentucky had complete football marching bands perform during a 2004 game at Ford Field between the two schools.

Baseball music

The first ballpark to have live music performed by an organist was Chicago’s Wrigley Field in 1941, and by the 1960s, it had expanded to most other Major Leagueparks. Beginning in the mid-1970s, pre-recorded pop and rock music began to be used to complement (or perhaps completely replace) the organ music at many baseball stadiums. ” Meet the Mets ” is a highly popular theme song from 1962, when the Mets first joined the Major League Baseball. “Let’s Go Mets” was the theme song for the Mets’ World Series run in 1986, and it was written specifically for the team.

According to Slate, Major League Baseball players “may choose various songs as personal themes for their plate appearances, with some teams using a rotation of four different tunes every game” for their plate appearances.

He performs a mix of hip-hop and rock songs, mixed with gadgets meant to energize the crowd and raise the overall noise of the stadium.” A rendition of the 1902 Red Sox battle song by the Dropkick Murphys was released the following year, and it ended up energizing Red Sox fans as their team advanced to the 2004 ALCS and World Series championship games.

It is customary for former Braves to be greeted with the song “Welcome Back, Kotter.” People who are native to Georgia are singing the state’s iconic regional song, ” Georgia on My Mind “.

This fight song is played for all players who played at current ACC-members Louisville, Notre Dame, and Pittsburgh or current SEC-members Missouri and Texas A&M—the five most recent members of their respective conferences in baseball—regardless of whether their team was in the American (then–Big East) or Big 12 conferences at the time of their participation in this fight song.

Repertoire

In certain circumstances, a specific song may be played at a specific point in the game’s progression. Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a song that is frequently performed or sung during major- or minor-league baseball games, usually during the seventh inning stretch. Since 2002, the Boston Red Sox have played Neil Diamond’s song, ” Sweet Caroline,” during the eighth inning of their home games at Fenway Park. The song has been a regular feature of the program since 2002. During the middle of the eighth inning of New York Mets home games since 2006, Sweet Caroline has also performed over the sound system.

The Buffalo Bills of the National Football League have been attributed for having the White Stripes play “Seven Nation Army” before each team’s kickoff during the regular season.

Hockey music

Occasionally, a certain song may be played at a specified point throughout the game’s progression. At major- or minor-league baseball games, Take Me Out to the Ball Game is frequently performed or sung, usually during the seventh inning stretch. During the eighth inning of Boston Red Sox home games, Neil Diamond’s song, ” Sweet Caroline,” is played. The song has been a regular part of the program at Fenway Park since 2002. During the middle of the eighth inning of New York Mets home games since 2006, Sweet Caroline has also played over the sound system.

Prior to each team kickoff, the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League are recognized with having the White Stripes play “Seven Nation Army” before them.

Association football music

In certain circumstances, a specific song may be played at a given point throughout the game’s course. At major- or minor-league baseball games, Take Me Out to the Ball Game is frequently performed or sung, usually during the seventh-inning stretch. Since 2002, the Boston Red Sox have played Neil Diamond’s song, ” Sweet Caroline,” during the eighth inning of their home games at Fenway Park. During the middle of the eighth inning of New York Mets home games since 2006, Sweet Caroline has also been playing over the sound system.

The Buffalo Bills of the National Football League have been attributed with having the White Stripes perform “Seven Nation Army” before each team’s kickoff.

Theme music in American football

In certain circumstances, a specific song may be played at a specified point in the game. Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a song that is frequently performed or sung during major- or minor-league baseball games, typically during the seventh inning stretch. At Fenway Park, the song ” Sweet Caroline ” by Neil Diamond is played during the eighth inning of Boston Red Sox home games, and it has been a regular component of the program since 2002. Since 2006, Sweet Caroline has also performed over the sound system at the middle of the eighth inning of New York Mets home games.

As a result, after several years of playing Diamond’s hit single in response to the home team’s success, it became an established custom. The Buffalo Bills of the National Football League have been noted for having the White Stripes play “Seven Nation Army” before each team’s kickoff.

Theme music in Australian rules football

In certain circumstances, a specific song may be played at a specific point in the game’s progression. Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a song that is frequently performed or sung during major- or minor-league baseball games, usually during the seventh inning stretch. Since 2002, the Boston Red Sox have played Neil Diamond’s song, ” Sweet Caroline,” during the eighth inning of their home games at Fenway Park. The song has been a regular feature of the program since 2002. During the middle of the eighth inning of New York Mets home games since 2006, Sweet Caroline has also performed over the sound system.

The Buffalo Bills of the National Football League have been attributed for having the White Stripes play “Seven Nation Army” before each team’s kickoff during the regular season.

Theme music in other sports

Every now and again, an entire team will adopt a theme song (such as theChicago Bearswith their 1985Super Bowl Shuffle, sung by the members of the team). For many years, Monday Night Football had its own theme song, performed by Hank Williams, Jr.; the Hockey Night in Canadatheme has been referred to as Canada’s second national anthem; and the Olympic Gameshave had powerful theme music composed to accompany ceremonies opening and closing the games since their inception. A good example of this can be found in professional wrestling and some mixed martial arts companies, where practically every wrestler has an entering theme made just for them based on their individual character.

There have been previous releases of albums with a similar sound, such asJock Jams.

See also

  • Introductory music, fight song, football cry, stadium anthem, stadium organist, and music in professional wrestling are some examples.

References

  • Aspects of the Olympic Games that are culturally significant include: the Ancient Olympic Games, music, and the Olympic Spirit. The Sports Economist’s Economic Commentary on SportsSociety was published on Wednesday, August 18, 2004, and is as follows: At the ballpark, there is a technical change. What is it about stadium rock that all sounds the same? The Sports Court: Rock and Jocks
  • Rock and Jocks
  • Total Request Attending a baseball game in person
  • The Ravens in March from Baltimore
  • Crossroads between music and sports are explored in this documentary.

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