Why Does Jack Command The Boys To Dance And Chant

Why does Jack command the boys to dance and chant, and why is this an effective leadership tactic?

In chapter nine, Jack has provided the others with meat and exerted his authority over the gang, putting Ralph in a difficult position. During a heated exchange of words, Ralph asserts his rightful position as chief of the department. When it starts to rain, he makes fun of Jack for not having constructed any shelters. To deflect attention away from the subject. In chapter nine, Jack has provided the others with meat and exerted his authority over the gang, putting Ralph in a difficult position.

When it starts to rain, he makes fun of Jack for not having constructed any shelters.

“Please join us in our dance!

The dance, with its chorus of “I love you” repeated over and again, “Put an end to the beast!

  • Let him bleed to death!
  • The use of emotion as a leadership approach is beneficial because groups are more typically affected by emotion than by rationality.
  • According to Ralph in the following chapter, the crime brings them together since they have a terrible secret in common and strengthens Jack’s power over the island.
  • When Jack orders the lads to “Do our dance!
  • Dance!” in Chapter Nine of Lord of the Flies, they comply.
  • Jack used the dance and chanting as a diversionary strategy to divert attention away from Ralph’s extremely serious and practical queries concerning the construction of the storm shelter and the building’s construction.
  • Jack’s invitation to dance diverts the lads’ attention away from more important issues; this is a successful and manipulative strategy on his part.
  • The eNotes Editorial Team has given their approval.

Chapter 9: A View To A Death

The intent and impact of Jack’s generosity with the meat he and the hunters gathered are described in detail in Chapter 1. What do you believe his choice to serve meat to even Ralph and Piggy is intended to demonstrate? – To win the lads over to Jack’s side, he must display the qualities of a leader in order to persuade them to remain with him in order to be well-provided for in the future. What is the motivation behind Jack’s order for the boys to dance and chant, and why is this a successful leadership strategy?

  • Remember the effect that putting on cosmetics had on them in Chapter 4?
  • When Jack tells the lads to dance and chant, he is attempting to divert their attention away from the cacophony surrounding them and to make them concentrate on a single item.
  • The chanting and dancing allow the lads to act in a terrible manner, and it is leading them to transform into primal beings as they continue.
  • Who or what is the “beast” that the guys are hunting?
  • What is the symbolic significance of this?
  • He was the only boy who believed there was no beast, which is ironic and terrible, and it is more unfortunate because he was the only one who was not a member of the gang at the time.

4. What do you suppose Golding was thinking when he chose to have the “figure” soar over the lads on the beach and into the sea? What do you believe he was thinking when he ordered Simon’s body to be swept away, and what do you think this represents in a psychological sense?

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1. Summarize the lads’ demeanor at the start of the chapter. What is the thematic importance of this particular scene? At the beginning of the chapter, the littluns are busy constructing constructions in the sand to pass the time till the next chapter. They fight by hurling sand at one another and making each other scream. The sand castles are subsequently knocked over by two of the biguns, and one of them feels bad about it. The relevance of this scene is that the lads are beginning to forget one other’s sentiments and are getting more savage, and Maurice feeling bad demonstrates that the boys still have some semblance of a moral compass.

What does their behavior reveal about the nature of human beings?

Roger refrains from hurling the stones straight at Henry since he is well aware that doing so will get him in danger.

What leads to the hunters’ decision to “paint” themselves with arrowheads?

Chapter 3: Huts On The Beach

1. Talk about the shift in Jack’s demeanor that is stated at the beginning of the chapter. 2. Is it possible to find out what Jack’s top priority is, and what this tells us about him? At the beginning of the chapter, Jack wished for order and for the rules to be obeyed, yet now he is wearing tattered shorts and is filled with the urge to murder. His number one objective is to kill and obtain meat for consumption, which indicates that he is beginning to transition from his ordered methods to a manner of murdering, savagery, and ultimately to become primal in nature.

How are the lads, with the exception of Ralph and Simon (as well as Jack), behaving?

What distinguishes Ralph, Simon, and Piggy from the other boys that the other guys do not appear to possess?

Why Does Jack Command The Tribe To Dance And Chant? (Question)

In the midst of chantas, Jack instructs the lads to dance, and they enthusiastically comply. By doing so, they are no longer able to think clearly and are completely absorbed in the exhilaration of being a hunter and a member of Jack’s tribal society.

Why does Jack command the tribe to dance and chant and why is this an effective leadership tactic?

Jack’s invitation to dance diverts the lads’ attention away from more important issues; this is a successful and manipulative strategy on his part. The chant unites the guys around a single goal, which makes it very simple for them to forget about their problems on the island while the song continues.

Why does Jack’s tribe chant and dance Why do Ralph and Piggy participate?

As the rain begins to fall, Ralph inquires of Jack as to how he intends to survive the storm, given that he has not constructed any storm shelters.

In response, Jack instructs his tribe to perform the wild hunting dance, which they promptly do. The guys replicate the pig hunting once more, reaching a fever pitch of frantic energy as they sing and dance their way into the forest.

What does the chanting and dancing symbolize in Lord of the Flies?

Lord of the Flies uses chanting to signify the importance of an action or an object, but it’s also utilized to quiet and relax the bodies of the youngsters who are participating in the play. It is, however, not limited to the realm of fiction.

What does Jack’s tribe chant?

“Death to the pig.” Cut her throat with a knife. “I’m going to spill her blood.” Jack’s hunters chant as a collective immediately following their first successful hunt, demonstrating that they prefer to behave as a mob rather than as individuals when committing acts of aggression.

Why does Jack command the boys to dance and chant what effect does dancing and chanting have on the boys?

It is necessary to put down the pig.” slit her neck with a pair of scissors She’s going to bleed to death. Jack’s hunters chant as a collective immediately following their first successful hunt, demonstrating that they prefer to behave as a mob rather than as individuals when committing acts of terrorism.

What does the dance signify?

Dance can represent happiness, celebration, and/or being possessed by a higher power, whether good or bad. The act of dancing is also associated with the sense of rhythm and the transformation of time into movement.

What does Jack do when Ralph and Piggy show up at the feast quizlet?

What happens when Ralph and Piggy come up for the feast and Jack is the host? He offers them meat in exchange for their cooperation in joining his tribe.

What does Jack do when Ralph and Piggy approach the feast?

What happens when Ralph and Piggy come up for the feast and Jack is the host? With his spear, he chases them away from the scene.

Why do Piggy and Ralph join Jack’s celebration?

Piggy and Ralph attend the banquet in the belief that they would be able to exert some influence over the proceedings there. The lads are having a good time at the feast while eating the roasted pig.

How does Jack treat piggy Lord of the Flies?

With the belief that they would be able to maintain some control over the situation, Piggy and Ralph head to the banquet. Boys are laughing and enjoying pig roasting at a party in which they had invited their friends.

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What is the purpose of the hunting chant?

Hunt Songs (also known as Taronway in the Na’vi language) are frequently used to accompany rites of passage, notably as a precursor to the time when a Na’vi first joins with his or her banshee. They may be sung in unison, though they are most typically recited in rapid succession.

What psychological effect does dancing and chanting have?

Answer: They are unable to think clearly and are completely immersed in the experience of being a member of the hunts. It is through the practice of their dance that they begin to develop barbarism and to drift further away from civilized society. As a result of this incident, the hunters mistakenly killed Simon, believing him to be the Beast.

What two worlds does the narrator say?

What two realms, according to the narrator, are represented by Jack and Ralph? The realm of desire and befuddled commonsense, according to Ralph (71).

What is the dance LOTF?

During the course of the hunt, the boys perform their first ceremonial dance, which serves to instill courage in them. The youngsters would do the dance and yell their slogans, which included “Kill the beast!,” as an example. Make a slit in his throat! “Let him bleed to death!” (P86) if they are successful in their quest for the pig.

What chant do the boys sing as they dance in Chapter 9?

What is the chant that the lads are singing while they dance?

“Kill the beast!” the guys yell at each other. Make a slit in his throat! “Let him bleed to death!”

Chapter 9: “A View to a Death”

The intent and impact of Jack’s generosity with the meat he and the hunters gathered are described in detail in Chapter 1. What do you believe his choice to serve meat to even Ralph and Piggy is intended to demonstrate? – This is done in order to persuade Piggy and Ralph that they, too, can become members of the tribe. For the first time, Jack has demonstrated to them that he is a decent and capable leader. What is the motivation behind Jack’s order for the boys to dance and chant, and why is this a successful leadership strategy?

  1. Remember the effect that putting on cosmetics had on them in Chapter 4?
  2. The lads are thrown into a trance by chanting and dancing, and they no longer recognize themselves but instead see themselves as savages, allowing them to be easily led by Jack.
  3. Who or what is the “beast” that the guys are hunting?
  4. What is the symbolic significance of this?
  5. This is crucial symbolically because it demonstrates that the Boys have murdered Simon (a figure who represents love and goodness), causing them to become absorbed by evil and their own inner “beast.” 4.
  6. In your opinion, why do you believe he ordered Simon’s body to be swept away, and what does this symbolize in a psychological sense?
  7. If the boys had listened to Simon, they would have discovered that their fears were unfounded, and they would have learned that there is no beast.

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1. What does Ralph say that causes Jack to become enraged? What is Jack’s preferred method of expressing his rage? What is Jack’s reaction to his inability to garner support from the group, and what does this reaction imply about the lads’ long-term prospects? Ralph degrades his hunts by referring to them as “measly armed youths with sticks,” which is an insult. Jack then vents his rage by announcing his intention to become the next Chief. As soon as he realizes that he would not be able to garner the support of the group, he departs and goes out to hunt and build his own “tribe.” This predicts that the boys’ tribes will split in the future, with Jack joining his own tribe and Ralph joining Ralph’s tribe.

What does Piggy do to demonstrate “intellectual daring”?

When Piggy comes up with the brilliant idea of moving the fire closer to where they are, the boys are thrilled because they have spent so much time on the island that they have developed more savage ways of thinking.

Piggy’s brilliant idea is important to the boys because it shows that at least one of them understands what they are doing. 3. What are your thoughts about the bigots?

Chapter 10: “The Shell and the Glasses”

1. What are Ralph and Piggy’s thoughts on Simon’s death? What is the reaction of each of them to it? As he exclaims, “I got the conch,” why does Ralphlaugh, and why does Piggy respond so strongly to his laughter? What justifications do they have for their actions, and what justifications do they come up with to justify their actions? What do their reactions reveal about them as individuals and about human nature as a whole? Simon’s death, according to Piggy, was an accident; but, according to Ralph, it was murder.

Piggy responds violently to this because he feels that he is the perpetrator of Simon’s murder, and thus serves to further emphasize the concept that Simon’s death was an accident, demonstrating the dread that has been ingrained into human nature.

It implies that, despite the fact that they had each spoken

Chapter 3: “Huts on the Beach”

– A one-paragraph summary of each chapter Throughout this chapter, we are shown how Jack is still enthusiastic about locating meat, hunting, and slaughtering a pig for his family. Ralph, on the other hand, is only concerned with getting rescued, and he and Simon build shelters to do so. There is growing tension between Ralph and Jack—tell us what kind of conflict is being shown here. Who is a party to this battle and what is their role? Exactly what happens as a result of this struggle? Man vs.

  1. Ralph and Jack have divergent points of view, which drives them to disagree with one another.
  2. Talk about the shift in Jack’s demeanor that is stated at the beginning of the chapter.
  3. Is it possible to find out what Jack’s top priority is, and what this tells us about him?
  4. His top concern, as far as we can determine, is getting rescued, which tells us how he wishes for order and normalcy to be restored.

Lord of the Flies Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis

When Simon wakes up, he finds the air gloomy and humid, with a storm looming overhead. His nose is bleeding, and he is staggering in a fog toward the mountain in front of him. As he crawls up the slope, he notices the dead pilot with his fluttering parachute in the dim light of the setting sun. Following the parachute as it sways back and forth with the wind, Simon sees that the lads have mistook this innocuous thing for the terrible beast that has thrown their entire group into disarray. When Simon comes face to face with the body of the parachutist, he begins to vomit.

  • Simon staggers toward the distant light of the fire at Jack’s feast, determined to show to the other lads that the beast is not real after all, to tell them what he has witnessed.
  • The lads are having a good time at the feast while eating the roasted pig.
  • Following the enormous lunch, Jack offers an invitation to all of Ralph’s supporters to come and live with him and his people.
  • As the rain begins to fall, Ralph inquires of Jack as to how he intends to survive the storm, given that he has not constructed any storm shelters.
  • Chanting and dancing in many distinct circles down the beach, the guys seem to have entered into a state of trance-like exhilaration.
  • The guys replicate the pig hunting once more, reaching a fever pitch of frantic energy as they sing and dance their way into the forest.
  • The lads, on the other hand, do not recognize him in their wild state.
  • However, Simon stumbles and falls over the rocks into the shore, making it impossible for him to explain what has occurred or remind them of who he is.
  • The storm erupts over the island in a rage.

Howling winds and waves carry Simon’s dismembered corpse into the ocean, where it drifts away surrounded by luminous fish as it drifts away. Meanwhile, the wind drives the body of a parachutist down the edge of the mountain into the beach, sending the youngsters screaming into the night air.

Analysis: Chapter 9

When Simon wakes up, he finds the air gloomy and humid, with a storm looming over his shoulder. A bloody nose bleeds from his face as he stumbles toward the mountain in a fog. In the fading light, he spots the dead pilot with his fluttering parachute as he makes his way up the mountain. Following the parachute as it sways back and forth with the wind, Simon sees that the lads have mistook this innocuous thing for the dangerous beast that has thrown their entire group into turmoil. He immediately starts vomiting once he comes face to face with the parachutist’s body.

  • He’s done!
  • He tells them what he has seen, and they all laugh.
  • Boys are laughing and enjoying pig roasting at a party in which they had invited their friends.
  • Following the enormous feast, Jack offers an invitation to all of Ralph’s supporters to come and live with him and his tribe..
  • After noticing that it is beginning to rain, Ralph inquires as to Jack’s intentions for surviving the storm, noting that he has not constructed any shelters so far.
  • The lads are engulfed in a state of frenzy as they chant and dance in numerous distinct circles around the beach.
  • Once again, as they shout and dance, the lads repeat the hunt for the pig, reaching a fever pitch of frantic intensity.
  • The lads, on the other hand, are completely unfamiliar with him in their untamed form.
  • However, Simon stumbles and falls over the rocks into the shore, making it impossible for him to explain what has happened or to remind them of his identity.
  • Throughout the island, the storm erupts.

Simon’s wounded corpse is washed out into the ocean by howling winds and waves, where it drifts away surrounded by luminous fish. At the same time, the wind blows the body of the parachutist down the edge of the mountain and into the beach, sending the youngsters screaming into the darkness.

Chapter 8 and 9 Lord of the Flies

What does ralph say that angers jack? he calls the hunters boys armed with sticks
How does Jack express his anger? he criticizes Ralphs way of law and tries to get rid of ralph as a leader with everyones support
How does jack respond to his failure to get support from the group? he leaves to go off on his own this suggest that the boys might have a hard time without him getting food
How does Piggy show “intellectual daring”? Why is this significant he thinks of the idea to move the fire; its significant because he’s the only one that would have the intellect to think of that
why do the biguns wait until the other boys are occupied to leave instead of supporting jacks challenge at the meeting? The biguns wait because they don’t want to show betrayal to ralph; they are ashamed that they wanna follow Jack
What unusual thing happens to ralph after jack leaves? he begins giving up hope at being rescuedhe is telling himself that they will all come back
What suggestion does Simon make and why? he suggests that they come face to face with the beast because he wants them to see that the beast is not a real alive animal
What are the consequences of the boys decision not to follow him? they remain scared and still believe that the beast is real
What do Jack and the biguns decide to do about the beast? jack suggest that they just forget about the beast and celebrate by killing a pig
What foolish decision does jack make during the hunt? he leaves the pig right where they killed itflies are now swarming it
What happens to simon after the hunters leave? he begins to hallucinate
What does simon see and what does it say to him thats significant? he sees the pig head and thinks its talking to him its saying “i am the lord of the flies”(he faints after he sees and hears it)
What does the pig head represent? that the evil is actually within themsimon was right all along
What is the purpose of Jack’s generosity with the meat he obtained and what does this show? he wants to persuade them shows that he can provide for them
Why does jack command the boys to dance and chant and why is this a leadership tactic? to make them less scared and to distract them
What physiological effect does the dancing and chanting have on them? brainwashing them to become savagesthey get in the zone to kill something
What is the “beast” that the boys kill? simon
How is Simons death ironic and Tragic? simon was the only good one and knew that the beast was not a real animal
Why do you think Golding decided to have the figure fly over the boys and into the sea and why did the body get washed to the shore? lets the boys know that they didn’t really kill the beastfinally off the island and to show that simon is one with nature
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Why do the boys begin the dance and the chant? – dengenchronicles.com

Jack used the dance and chanting as a diversionary strategy to divert attention away from Ralph’s extremely serious and practical queries concerning the construction of the storm shelter and the building’s construction. With the dance, the lads are united in their need for blood, which is led by Jack, the most powerful hunter in the gang, who leads them in a frenzy of bloodlust.

What chant do the boys sing as they dance Lord of the Flies?

What is the chant that the lads are singing while they dance? They chant, “Kill the beast! Kill the beast!” Make a slit in his throat! “Let him bleed to death!”

How are the boys dancing in Lord of the flies?

Chanting and dancing in many distinct circles down the beach, the guys seem to have entered into a state of trance-like exhilaration. Even Ralph and Piggy, who have been caught away by the enthusiasm, dance on the periphery of the crowd. The guys replicate the pig hunting once more, reaching a fever pitch of frantic energy as they sing and dance their way into the forest.

Why do the boys chant in Lord of the flies?

Those chants and dances would have given the youngsters a sense of belonging if they had taken place in the Lord of the Flies. Individuals who do not choose to participate in such activities would be deemed “outliers” by their peers, and outliers are frequently perceived as a danger to the social cohesiveness of the group.

Why does Jack command the boys to dance and chant?

With the dance, the lads are united in their need for blood, which is led by Jack, the most powerful hunter in the gang, who leads them in a frenzy of bloodlust. Jack’s invitation to dance diverts the lads’ attention away from more important issues; this is a successful and manipulative strategy on his part.

What happens in Chapter 9 of the Lord of the flies?

The Lord of the Flies is a novel written by William Golding. Chapter 9 is a collection of short stories about a group of friends who go on a camping trip. SummaryAnalysis. The youngsters have given up their independence in exchange for the security of an all-powerful leader. When Ralph arrives, Jack asks the gathered lads if they would want to become members of his tribe. Ralph claims that he is still chief and that he still has the conch, but Jack claims that the conch has no power on this side of the island and that the conch is no longer in his possession.

Lord of the Flies Summary

“The Sound of the Shell” is the first chapter of the novel. “Fire on the Mountain” is number two on the list. Pig 1: Jack makes an unsuccessful attempt to murder a piglet here, shirking the prospect of pouring blood on his own clothes. He does, however, go so far as to pull his knife and attempt to chop the creature’s throat, albeit he is stopped by something. Another character on the island who has been left behind to care after the children is named Piggy, which is also an allusion to this theme….

  1. Painting their faces and wearing long hair is number four on the list.
  2. He tells Ralph that he must kill a pig first before they may be saved, claiming that fruit alone would not suffice and that they will starve if they do not consume meat.
  3. He leads the other lads on a pig hunt while carrying the dead pig’s lifeless body.
  4. However, the capture of the pig results in the loss of an opportunity to be rescued since, with all of the boys away hunting, no one was on the mountain to tend to the signal fire, and a ship passes them by without stopping to help.
  5. Pig 4: After killing a pig, a ritual is created out of the hunting procedure.
  6. The pig is cooked and consumed by the lads, who include Ralph, with great gusto.
  7. “Gift for the Darkness” is number eight on the list.
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The customary song from earlier is repeated, with even Ralph joining in, with the exception that the pig is now addressed as “he” rather than “she,” with Robert impersonating the pig.

Take him down with a thud.” Ralph eventually dissuades them from their desire to go on a hunt, and he eventually encourages them to continue their quest for the beast.

6: After detaching themselves from Ralph’s democracy, Jack and his hunters are successful in killing another another pig, this time a nursing sow.

With Jack’s blood on his face like battle paint, they are able to chop the sow’s head off and leave it on a spike in the woods as a sacrifice for the wild creature.

“A View to a Death” is the ninth chapter.

Pig 7: After devouring the carcass of the deceased sow, Ralph and the rest of the guys participate in yet another ceremonial dance, this time to experience the excitement of the hunt, the joy of killing a living being.

Let him bleed to death!” In the dance, Roger has taken on the role of the pig/beast.

“Castle Rock” is the eleventh chapter.

12) Pig 8: Jack arrives from the woodland after yet another hunt, dumping a decapitated sow on the ground as he prepares to meet Piggy and Ralph.

The night Simon was slain, a decapitated sow was eaten by a ravenous wolf.

Pig 9: Piggy is slain, and his after-death spasms are also compared to those of a dying pig.

After learning that Samneric will have to hurl their spears at him the following day “as if at a pig,” Ralph decides to talk to them under the cover of darkness.

Pig 11: Ralph flees from the hunters and begins to behave in ways that are similar to those of a pig, attempting to think and rationalize, but failing miserably since Piggy is not around to counsel and provide him with reason and logic.

His solution is to compare his own views to those of a pig, and then wonders aloud whether or not “a pig would agree.”

Lord of the Flies Summary Chapter 4

Faces painted with bright colors and long hair

  • More time has elapsed without being indicated. Ralph, Simon, and Piggy have established a sort of rhythm in their lives, which includes the littluns playing together, the biguns (Jack and the choir boys) continuing to hunt pigs, and the other lads (Ralph, Simon, and Piggy) attempting to build shelters and keep the signal fire burning. By the way, there are sharks in the ocean beyond the reef, so be cautious. When one of the children, Percival, begins to cry all the time, everyone assumes he is going insane. The biguns and littluns have evolved into distinct groupings, but Simon, Maurice, and Roger are treading a tight line due to their size (in general, though, it appears that they are classified as biguns)
  • Being a littlun is a miserable experience since no one truly cares about them. They’ve constructed and embellished sandcastles beside the little river, which has served as their playground and general living quarters. We see Henry, the largest of the littluns, hanging out with the tiniest of the littluns (Percival and Johnny). The children are “at peace” until Roger and Maurice come along and step on their sandcastles, with Roger taking the lead and Maurice feeling a little bad
  • Then the children are “at war” again. Is it possible to determine which one will wind up being the embodiment of evil once more? Following Henry as he wanders off to an overlook
  • Below, Ralph, Simon, Piggy, and Maurice are swimming in the pool (the little and naturally-occurring variety, not the cabana kind)
  • Roger tosses stones at Henry as he walks away to an overlook. To some extent, yes. The reason he misses on purpose is that, for the time being at least, he still possesses some appearance of decency
  • “Samneric,” as Jack refers to the twins, who are with Sam, Eric, and Bill and continue on their pig-hunting spree
  • Samneric is a nickname for the twins. Following the completion of the face painting plan, which included the use of white and red clay as well as a stick of charcoal, Jack looks in the mirror of a coconut shell filled with water and is delighted to find a “amazing stranger” smiling back at him from the other side. In the midst of his dancing, it appears that the mask is a “thing in and of itself, behind which Jack concealed.” When he instructs the lads to accompany him, they obey “the mask” rather than Jack’s commands. It’s a creepy piece of work. Meanwhile, Ralph, Simon, and Piggy are still swimming with Maurice in the lagoon. No one takes Piggy’s idea that they should build a sundial seriously since, as has been customary, no one believes him. Ralph is startled when he sees a ship. There is a lot of enthusiasm following
  • The signal fire is still burning, isn’t it? Ralph races up the mountain to observe, “doing furious harm to his bare body among the rasping creepers so that blood was sliding over him,” as the man is described as “dying in the mountains.” (Yes, I’m still completely nude.) But, before he leaves, Simon appears to have figured out what’s going on. He “cries out as if he’s harmed himself” and attempts to put his hand on Ralph’s cheek. Interesting
  • As you could expect, the signal fire has been extinguished
  • By the time they have calmed down, the spacecraft has vanished. So, where have all of the (ex) choir guys gone who were meant to be tending the fire gone missing
  • Everyone on the summit looks down and sees a parade of choir boys who have finally thrown off their black robes and joined in with the public nudity on the mountain. Their black hats remain on their heads, but they are also led by Jack, who is carrying a dead pig tied to a stake and shouting, “It is the end of the world.” “The pig is sick. Cut her throat with a knife. Make her blood splatter “in addition to this, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at [email protected] “You let the fire go out,” Jack and his posse exclaim after telling the story of how they slaughtered the pig
  • Ralph only stares at them, expressionless, before saying, “You let the fire go out.” Jack and his colleagues had that “oops” feeling, which is followed by a strong sense of guilt. So, naturally, Jack smacks Piggy in the face since he has been piggyrailsoning them for being reckless
  • When Simon discovers Piggy’s spectacles, he discovers that one of the lenses has been cracked, leaving Piggy with just one eye’s vision. Oops
  • Finally, Jack breaks down and expresses his regret. Ralph calmly orders them to re-start the fire while remaining still and stoical. His chieftainship has been restored, and the choir boys are busy rebuilding the fire while Ralph merely stands there and glares at them till he eventually arrives with what’s left of Piggy’s glasses to ignite the fire. Obviously uncomfortable with his only means of seeing being used in this manner, Piggy grabs the “specs” and throws them away as soon as they are placed in the oven, where the lads proceed to roast the pig they slaughtered, pulling off chunks of meat and devouring it like wolves. In an attempt to appear indignant and superior to everyone, Ralph attempts to refrain from eating any of the meat Jack is roasting
  • However, this only lasts about two seconds once the smell of the meat reaches his nostrils
  • Remember, they’ve only been eating fruit and plants since they arrived on the island. There is no meat handed out to Piggy, and when Jack gives him a hard time about not assisting with the hunt, Simon offers Piggy some of his own meal
  • Jack is enraged and cries at Simon to ” “a t a t! You’ve been damned!” He has come to the conclusion that he has no control over the guys until they eat the meat he has procured for them all. The hunters recount their slaughter in graphic detail once more, and their chorus of “Kill it!” continues “Assassinate the pig. Cut her throat with a knife. Take her out with a thud “in addition to this, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at [email protected] Awesome. The lads are becoming into aggressive barbarians at an alarming rate. Since it appears that this is working, Ralph calls another meeting and walks down the mountain to get it scheduled

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