Why Doesnt Pope Francis Chant

Pope Francis Doesn’t Sing Or Chant …Tone-Deaf?

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Why doesn’t Pope Francis speak English or Chant

He doesn’t understand what you’re saying. You’re unable to chant or communicate in English? Pope claims that he is tone deaf as a result of his upbringing. Carol Glatz contributed to this article. News from the Catholic Church (Catholic News Service) VATICAN CITY (CNS) – The Vatican City State is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Many people were surprised to learn that Pope Francis does not sing or chant at Mass, nor does he speak in any other languages in public, following the example of a musically gifted and polyglot Pope Benedict XVI.

During the “Regina Coeli” on April 1, when he recited the Marian prayer rather than intoned it, his abandonment of any musical pitch was even more apparent.

  1. For quite some time, journalists had been requesting an explanation from the Vatican’s spokesman, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, who had previously refused.
  2. Father Lombardi speculated that Pope Francis, a fellow Jesuit, may have some of the same characteristics as his predecessor.
  3. Earlier this year, Father Lombardi stated that he believed the pope’s inability to sing is due to “a certain hoarseness” or huskiness in his tone of voice.
  4. However, it turns out that Pope Francis himself provided the explanation some years ago, concealed in one sentence in a book that was re-released under a new title following his election on March 13 this year.

Asked what languages he speaks in the book, which is a series of conversations with the then-cardinal archbishop of Buenos Aires, the future pope replies, “I speak three.” When asked about his immaculate fluency in Italian, the future pope stated he used to speak French “quite well” and German “very well,” but said a lack of effort had caused his current competence to suffer.

  1. He went on to say that he knows the Piedmontese dialect spoken by his father and maternal grandparents, who were born and raised in the region.
  2. On his mother’s side, he had an uncle who was a police officer “An elderly gentleman who taught us filthy folk tunes in Genoese dialect, notwithstanding his age.
  3. Pope Francis’ reluctance to speak in public in any language other than Italian has emerged as yet another characteristic of his papacy.
  4. In the words of Father Lombardi, “it’s very evident that he doesn’t want to discriminate” or show any bias by choosing to speak just some languages and not others, including his own native Spanish.

An Open Letter to Pope Francis, by Roseanne T Sullivan

He is deafeningly silent. No ability to sing or speak English? No problem. This, according to Pope, is due to his deafening lack of musical ability. Carol Glatz contributed to this report. News Service of the Catholic Church VATICAN CITY (CNS) – The Vatican City State is hosting a conference on the future of the Church. The fact that Pope Francis does not sing or chant at Mass or speak in foreign languages in public, especially after a musically gifted and multilingual predecessor, came as a shock to many.

  1. During the “Regina Coeli” on April 1, when he recited the Marian prayer rather than intoned it, his abandonment of any musical pitch was even more obvious.
  2. For quite some time, journalists had been requesting an explanation from the Vatican’s spokesman, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi.
  3. Those characteristics, according to Father Lombardi, may be shared by Pope Francis, who is also a fellow Jesuit.
  4. Earlier this year, Father Lombardi stated that he believed the pope’s inability to sing is due to “a certain hoarseness” or huskiness in his voice.
  5. However, it turns out that Pope Francis himself provided the explanation some years ago, concealed in one line in a book that was re-released under a different title following his election on March 13th, 2013.
  6. A question about the future pope’s linguistic skills is raised in the book, which is a collection of interviews with the then-cardinal archbishop of Buenos Aires.
  7. As a result of his tone deafness, “English was the one language that always caused me major difficulties,” he claimed, particularly with its pronunciation.
  8. He also said that he understands a small amount of the dialect of the Genoa region, but that practically all of it is “off-color,” according to other passages from the book.
  9. As his predecessors had done, he did not send Easter greetings in a plethora of languages on March 31, and he no longer reads summaries of his general audience lecture in any language other than Italian, including his native tongue of Spanish, which he learned as a child.

It is “clearly his opinion – whether for reasons of preparation or exertion – that he personally read all of the summaries in all of the different languages” during the general audience, in which Vatican officials from the Secretariat of State now read the summaries in their native languages, according to a Vatican spokesperson.END

Opinion

It was in the summer of 2001 that I traveled to Poughkeepsie, New York, in search of what we referred to as “the traditional Latin Mass,” a form of Roman Catholic worship that dates back centuries and was last authorized in 1962, just before the Second Vatican Council changed everything. I was unsuccessful. Conservative Catholics referred to those who sought it out as “schismatics” and “Rad Trads” during the time of their search. In terms of community, the individuals who attended Mass there were more like a clandestine network of romantics, detractors of Pope John Paul II, people who had been betrayed by the official church, and — believe it or not, some saints.

  1. The entire Mass was different from the one that took place after Vatican II.
  2. It took me a month to get used to the pace of the place.
  3. It was an eerie feeling.
  4. Today, it is celebrated in bustling churches, which are teeming with children and young families.
  5. Earlier this year, he published a paper called Traditionis Custodes, in which he accused Catholics like us of being subversives.
  6. He did this in order to safeguard the “unity” of the church.
  7. The elimination of terrorism is a religious priority for the Pope.

Instead of the love of Christ, it will lead people to believe that the new Mass constitutes a new religion, one committed to the unification of man on earth rather than the love of Christ.

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In contrast to current Masses, there were no peculiarities such as balloons, guitar music or applause, which can often be found in them.

In his place, a clergyman who conducts himself in a peaceful manner, and a sculptor who is meticulous in his work.

Over time, parishes began to reintroduce the sacred polyphony composed by long-dead composers such as Orlando Lassus and Thomas Tallis, and contemporary composers like as Nicholas Wilton and David Hughes, to the mystical tones of Gregorian chant and the sacred polyphony of the Renaissance.

They don’t even claim to be writing from a group of believing Christians in their letter.

As a result, it is associated with international culture as well as churchmen and formal Christians.

This ferment was accompanied by the emergence of radical new theologies all throughout the world.

Only overconfident Catholic bishops could have imagined anything other to be true.

They referred to Vatican II as ” a new Pentecost ” — a ” Event “— because it had provided the church with a new sense of itself.

However, with the election of Pope John Paul II in 1978, they believed their revolution had been put on hold once and for all.

He consolidates authority in Rome, usurps the prerogatives of provincial bishops, and implements a micromanaging style that is fueled by concern over disloyalty and heresy, among other things.

Pope Francis believes that we shall return to the old Mass in the near future.

To put it bluntly, they do not believe in the new Mass.

The altar was separated from the tabernacle when the priest was facing the congregation.

In a notable change from previous prayers, prayers highlighting the Lord’s actual presence in the sacrament were substituted with prayers emphasizing the Lord’s spiritual presence in the gathering congregation.

Rather than Christ’s offering and sacrifice, the new Mass presented itself as “a narrative and historical remembrance of the events recalled in Scripture,” with the offering and sacrifice being made by the assembled people, as stated in the most commonly used Eucharistic prayer in the new Mass, “from age to age you gather a people to Thyself, in order that from east to west a perfect offering may be made.” For Catholics, the way we pray has an impact on our beliefs.

  • Our physical journey toward an altar and tabernacle is guided by the ancient rituals.
  • Because of this, it demonstrates that God generously loves and redeems us despite our transgressions.
  • Consider Mozart’s magnificent rendering of faith in the Eucharist, “Ave Verum Corpus,” which is available on YouTube (Hail True Body).
  • According to the new Mass, God owes salvation to man because of the inherent dignity of human beings.
  • Now, where there used to be love, there is only affirmation, which is virtually indistinguishable from apathy.
  • It is my belief that the practice of the new Mass helps people to create a new faith: The only way to become authentically Christian is to stop to be a Christian at all.
  • It was during the early years of the new religion following the council that it manifested itself by knocking down the statues, the ceremonies, and the religious devotions that had previously existed.
  • My understanding is that they are willing to make our religious life as difficult as they can.
  • When I think about traditional Latin Mass movements, the ancient motto “We resist you to your face” comes to mind.
  • Pope Benedict had granted us permission to begin fixing the harm for the time being.
  • Michael Brendan Dougherty is a senior writer at National Review and a visiting fellow for the social, cultural, and constitutional studies division at the American Enterprise Institute.

He is the author of “My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home,” which was published by the American Enterprise Institute.

Pope Francis: “The liturgical reform was courageous. We must always go forward, those who go backward are mistaken.”

The Mass conducted by Pope Francis in the parish of Ognissanti (All Saints) in Rome yesterday commemorated the 50th anniversary of the first vernacular Mass performed there by Pope Paul VI in 1965. I was in attendance. Due to the fact that I did not have a ticket to enter the church, I found myself in the courtyard, where the Mass was being projected live on a giant screen. My monastic habit probably let me into the courtyard as well, as I didn’t have a ticket to go into it. When Pope Paul VI celebrated at Ognissanti in 1965, the Eucharistic Prayer would still have been in Latin, and the Roman Canon would have been the sole part of the service.

  • After a long period of formalization, the liturgy was fast becoming totally vernacular, which is what Pope Paul VI used mostly but not exclusively on March 7, 1965.
  • An excellent parish choir performed music that was intended for the audience – but it was done with a little of harmony and staggered entrances that suggested it was truly for a choir, and there weren’t very many people in attendance.
  • anyway, never mind.) The courtyard was filled with individuals who were singing when others gave basic answers, such as the memorial acclamation.
  • I am concerned about the pre-consecrated hosts that are being used by a large number of concelebrating priests, including a couple dozen who are in the courtyard distributing Communion to us.
  • If a courtyard is a courtyard, it is difficult to conduct liturgical prayer outside.
  • I suppose parenting thought now is different from what it was in Minnesota 40 years ago.) But there was a sense of a liturgical assembly in the air, which was probably more than would have been the case 50 years before.
  • I immediately felt at ease.

Then, using a microphone, he addressed the entire audience.

Francis congratulated us on our determination to remain outside in the freezing weather.

The Pope’s statements, which I have translated here, may be found starting at 3:50 in this news story.

but when the Lord is present, all is fine.

(“YES!”) Thank you very much.

Let us express our gratitude to the Lord for everything he has accomplished in his Church throughout the past 50 years of liturgical reform.

Being able to follow the Mass in this manner is very essential to us.

We must constantly take the next step ahead.

Those who believe they can go backward are misguided.

Thank you very much.

Then he repeated it again, this time without hesitation, and then he went on to say more.

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that the singing would be a little more powerful (laughter).

(“NO!”) It seems like I was only hearing the choir at times.

I’m not sure if you were singing out here, but I think you were (cheers).

Thank you everyone so much, and best wishes for the future! Forward!” Then he lead us in a Hail Mary, after which he blessed the group. Arrivederci!, he said at the end of his speech. Please say a prayer for me. Please say a prayer for me!

Pope Francis renews curbs on Latin Mass in rebuff to conservatives

Pope Francis holds the chalice as he celebrates the Eucharist during Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, in the Vatican, on November 22, 2020, as part of World Youth Day. Pope Francis is the head of the Roman Catholic Church. Photo by Vincenzo Pinto/Pool courtesy of REUTERS/File Photo

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Reuters reports that on July 16th, According to the Vatican, Pope Francis overruled judgments made by his two predecessors and re-imposed limits on the old-style Latin Mass, which is favoured by conservative Roman Catholics. He said that the Latin Mass was being used to further split the Church. Amid the latest round of what some have nicknamed “the liturgy wars,” conservative organizations expressed displeasure and outrage at the newest development. In the Church, some conservatives, particularly in the United States and some European countries, have used the Latin Mass as a rallying cry in their general opposition to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council, which included the introduction of Mass in vernacular languages, which took place from 1962 to 1965.

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Reuters reports that on July 16, According to the Vatican, Pope Francis overruled decisions made by his two predecessors and re-imposed limits on the old-style Latin Mass, which is popular among conservative Roman Catholics and has been used to split the Church. Amid the latest round of what some have nicknamed “the liturgical wars,” conservative organizations expressed displeasure and outrage at the decision. In the Church, some conservatives, particularly in the United States and some European countries, have used the Latin Mass as a rallying cry in their general opposition to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council, which included the introduction of Mass in vernacular languages, which took place between 1962 and 1965.

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(Reuters) – On July 16, Reuters reported that Pope Francis on Friday overruled judgments made by his two predecessors and re-imposed limits on the old-style Latin Mass, which is popular among conservative Roman Catholics and is being used to divide the Church, claiming it was being used to split the Church. Amid the latest chapter of what some have nicknamed “the liturgy wars,” conservative organizations expressed their displeasure and indignation at the new development. Some conservatives in the Church, notably in the United States and some European nations, have used the Latin Mass as a rallying cry in their broader resistance to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council, which included the introduction of Mass in vernacular languages.

r/Catholicism – Pope Francis Encourages Use of Gregorian Chant

Reuters reports on July 16 that Pope Francis on Friday overruled judgments made by his two predecessors and re-imposed limits on the old-style Latin Mass, which is favoured by conservative Roman Catholics and which the pope claims is being used to split the Church. Conservative organizations responded with dismay and outrage to the latest incident of what some have nicknamed the Church’s “liturgy warfare.” Some conservatives in the Church, notably in the United States and some European nations, have used the Latin Mass as a rallying cry in their broader resistance to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), which included the introduction of Mass in vernacular languages.

Pope Francis: ‘I don’t know how to sing. I don’t even know how to speak well.’

On December 31, 2015, Pope Francis arrives in Paul VI Hall at the Vatican to host a special audience for the “Pueri Cantores” singing group. Reproduced with permission from REUTERS/Max Rossi. THE CITY OF VATICAN (RNS) Francis informed a group of youthful choristers that he sings “like a donkey” and that he once desired to be a butcher. The pope took the uncommon step of answering questions from choristers during the annual assembly of the Pueri Cantores, an international Catholic choral society, on Thursday (Dec.

Francis shared his memories of growing up in Argentina, as well as his opinions on the media and anger, during the conversation with the audience.

Singing

Francis developed an appreciation for music as a kid while listening to opera broadcasts on the radio. Despite his belief that singing is beneficial for the soul, he claims he lacks the necessary abilities: “I enjoy listening to singing, but if I tried to sing, I’d sound like a donkey since I don’t know how to sing.” Even worse, I’m not even sure I know how to talk properly because I have a problem in the way I speak, a defect in my phonetics.”

Childhood ambition

He had a childhood aspiration of being a butcher: “Why? Because I liked to eat meat.” Because there were butchers in the market — there were three or four outlets for meat — they took the knife and cut the portions themselves. It’s an art form, and I enjoyed seeing it and watching it.”

Anger

When individuals do something wrong, the Pope admits that he becomes enraged, according to him. “But I’m not a biter!” he said. He referred to wrath as “poisonous,” and he appeared to be particularly enraged by individuals who have a “bitter soul,” as follows: “It appears that they wipe their teeth with vinegar every morning in order to be so enraged! The presence of such individuals is an illness.”

The media

Whenever someone does something wrong, the pope admits he becomes enraged. Nevertheless, he declared, “I don’t bite!” Angry people, he said, are “poisonous,” and those who have a “bitter soul” tend to be particularly upset by this. “It appears that they wipe their teeth with vinegar every morning in order to be so enraged! ” The presence of such individuals is an illness.

The Pope, the Media, and the Endless Nonsense

It took the election of Pope Francis to bring me back to reality about how completely ridiculous journalistic coverage of the Papacy can be, particularly in the early years. Unless you have read absolutely nothing about the new Pope — which, in the grand scheme of things, might not be a terrible idea — you are well aware of the situation. Pope Francis is sympathetic, straightforward, humble, and humanitarian, which contrasts sharply with…wait for it…a certain predecessor whose name shall not be revealed.

  • That this was a first, according to the BBC, was reported as something extraordinary.
  • At that point, a picture of a certain predecessor who, once again, shall not be named was shown in full regalia by the television camera.
  • Pope Francis vs.
  • They are covering this in the same manner in which they cover presidential politics in the United States.
  • It’s us vs them.
  • Progressives vs.
  • The only model they are familiar with, and they jam everything of reality into that paradigm, mostly in an effort to increase the amount of paper they sell.
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I’ve had a lot of flashbacks to the election of Pope Benedict XVI.

I had my own mental dossier on him, which I kept up to date.

That he was entrenched in the German theological tradition of that era was something I already knew about him.

Immediately, I saw that Benedict was not interested in regulations and impositions, but rather in inspiration and liberality.

I was aware that he had a caring heart and a vast intellect, and that he would engage anyone on important issues without fear.

As a result, I was completely taken aback by the way the media covered his election.

If you think of Torquemada, you’ve got the archetype.

In addition, it is harmful.

Despite the fact that he engaged in amazing ecumenical initiatives that fostered peace and understanding, he was ridiculed as a guy who harmed relations between Catholics and Muslims.

It was as though he couldn’t seem to get away from being labeled as the worst of all imaginable things: a conservative (boo hiss, goes the press).

They would go to any length to reaffirm their prejudices and bring damage to this magnificent guy.

Almost all of the coverage, from dawn to night, has focused on how he is the antithesis of Pope Benedict.

For all we knew, it was true.

It is thus imperative that you reflect on the following question: has your comprehension of the new Pope been affected by taking these press claims too seriously?

In my observations of this new Pope’s actions, I combined them with hyperbolic news coverage, feeling a tremendous sense of loss at Benedict my hero’s retirement, and drawing outrageously erroneous judgments about his character.

In addition, and tragically, Pope Francis has provided enough of food for the media to use in order to feed these tropes.

Argentina was a country where he traveled by bus.

He engaged in conversation with everyone and urged the priest to do the same.

He has devoted himself to this, just as Benedict was and continues to be.

It has the potential to be a wonderful contribution to the cause of evangelization.

This is something that we desperately need right now.

Benedict has exceptional abilities as a theologian, a liturgist, and as a teacher in every sense of the word.

However, there is one area in which it is all too simple to pit Francis against Benedict, and that is liturgy, a subject in which I have a strong personal interest.

He does not perform musically.

He utilized Holy Thursday to set a stunning new demographic precedent in the foot washing rite, which will be remembered for years to come.

Nudge nudge, people.

Quite honestly, one of his associates described him as “a slob.” Even if it was a loving remark, it was nevertheless a slap in the face.

It is never a good thing when the Pope himself defies the rules, even if it is done unintentionally.

It’s going to be ubiquitous in the future.

Young women’s feet were cleansed by him as well.

During the liturgy, it is repeated as a symbol of the priesthood, with the celebrant assuming the person of Christ.

However, if you look at it from the perspective of the Pope, he was present and not precisely in a position to distinguish between boys and girls in their liturgical responsibilities.

As someone who tends to consider the liturgy as less of a veritical sign and more of a horizontal kind of human service, his decision here makes perfect sense given his apparent perspective, which I sadly lament because it appears to be less than completely educated.

I really doubt it, but even if it did occur, it would appear to be a completely unintended consequence.

And perhaps the day will come when that will be the case.

One final lament on one potential interpretation of the Pope’s message that priests should be more willing to sacrifice, which was contained in one of his communications stating that priests should be more willing to sacrifice I’ve never met a priest who hasn’t had to make significant sacrifices in his or her everyday activities.

  1. They are destitute.
  2. They work themselves to exhaustion and may even become burnt out as a result of their service.
  3. Follow a priest about for a day or two and you’ll be amazed at what you find out.
  4. In addition, this is true for various types of workers of the church, such as singers and educators.
  5. This is the present state of affairs.

Despite the fact that I do not believe Pope Francis intended to give the impression that he agreed with the caricature, it is important to recognize that his words can be misconstrued and misrepresented by a media that does not understand or appreciate the extent to which any Church work is undertaken with deep humility in our uncomprehending world.

The blogosphere were brimming with claims that the new Pope had already instituted a “liturgical revolution,” as the phrase was being used.

In any case, I tuned in to witness the Palm Sunday services at the Vatican.

In the grand scheme of things, this is an incredible repair that has already set a precedent in the Vatican’s liturgical tradition.

However, what counts in this case is whether or not the Pope has the motivation or desire to overturn the precedent.

What I do see is a sincere and devoted servant of the religion who wishes to contribute his particular abilities to the institution at a time when it is in desperate need of assistance.

To be sure, we might be in for some tense days in the next weeks. It is critical that onlookers maintain their gaze fixed on the ground and not on the spin.

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