Why Is Seven Nation Army A Football Chant

Why is the White Stripes song ‘Seven Nation Army’ a football song?

Joel and Naomi Stamoolis have gotten to know the psalms musically via devotional singing and prayer through psalters. Both the Plainsong Psalter and the Anglican Chant Psalter, both published by Church Publishing, as well as the New Genevan Psalter, are recommended by the authors. It was important for Stamoolis to find musical settings that were both accessible to the congregation and that could be played by the scheduled worship artists each week as he searched for new musical settings for the assembly.

“We purposely began with familiar tunes in order to reassure the audience that it is feasible for our church to sing the psalms.” Joel Stamoolis is credited with inventing the term “semantic web.” It is set to the typical 8.8.8.8 D.

For Psalm 2, the WBC church did not know any of the three songs provided by Sing Psalms, which was a first for the congregation.

Psalm 2 was sung at the WBC, as shown above.

  1. “Now that we are more comfortable singing psalms, I may utilize some other settings when we return some of these early psalms,” says the leader.
  2. One worship team is equipped with instruments similar to those seen in a traditional bluegrass band.
  3. As a result, he produced a metered rendition of thetonus peregrinuschant tone for them.
  4. Due to the fact that Psalm 31 was written during Advent, he modified it to emphasize the subject of waiting.
  5. Every week, he assessed if the psalm was directing worshipers to do anything specific, such as kneel, clap hands, raise hands, cry out, recall, or dance, and if it was, he included that consideration.
  6. To make it simpler for our people to dance while singing, Stamoolis utilized the tune of the East African chorus ‘Hakuna Mungu Kama Wewe,’ which is a known song to them.

Why is ‘Seven Nation Army’ a football song?

The fact that ‘Seven Nation Army’ has become such a distinctive stadium song is partially due to the catchy quality of the song and the fact that it has been passed down down the generations. The initial seven notes are easily recognized by anybody, rock music lover or not, and they are repeated over and over again. ‘Seven Nation Army’ is one of those songs that you instantly attempt to play when you pick up a guitar or bass for the first time, and its simple yet effective start – “Doo, doo doo doo doo DOOOOO doo” – making it the perfect recipe for fans to sing along to.

  1. Although it only reached No.
  2. When the Belgian soccer team Club Brugge traveled to Italy for a Champions League match against AC Milan in 2006, the song is credited with turning it into an iconic stadium anthem.
  3. Following their 1-0 triumph over the Italian giants, Bruges is said to have celebrated the victory on their way home by singing the song’s signature riffs on their radio broadcast.
  4. Roma departed Belgium not just with a 2-1 triumph, but also with the song that Club Brugge had composed for their own European success over AC Milan in the previous year.

Since then, the song has been played at all of the main events, but notably during international championships, when it has become known as the “global flag song.” White Stripes frontman and guitarist Jack White expressed his appreciation for the song’s enormous success in international football in the video above, saying: “It’s an honor that the Italians have accepted this song as their own.” The moment when people welcome a tune and allow it to enter the pantheon of folk music is the most wonderful thing that can happen in music.

‘Seven Nation Army’ lyrics

I’m going to battle them. I could not be stopped by an army of seven nations. They are going to tear it all apart.. Taking advantage of me while I’m not looking. And I talk to myself at night because I can’t sleep without thinking about it. I’m going back and forth in my head. Make a cigarette in the oven. And the word is delivered through my eyes. “Leave it alone,” says the author. There will be no mention of it. It is known that everyone has a tale to share and that everyone knows about it From the Queen of England to the Hounds of Hell, everything is possible.

But that’s exactly what I’m about to do, and the sensation that comes from my legs confirms it.

I’m taking a trip to Wichita.

Create an environment where perspiration drips from every pore, and I bleed, and I bleed, and I bleed Right before the Lord, all of my words are going to bleed out of me, and I don’t want to sing any more after that.

Why Is Seven Nation Army A Soccer Chant?

In the same way that most great stories begin, the origins of the soccer chant Seven Nation Army occurred in a pub, just before a soccer match. However, it is not the band’s humble beginnings or even its catchy riff that distinguishes Seven Nation Army as a singular force in soccer culture; rather, it is the capacity of people all over the world, regardless of language or background, to come together and sing as one in a unique chorus. The soccer cry Seven Nation Army, from the White Stripes’ song Seven Nation Army, has enjoyed a rebirth during the 2018 World Cup.

Seven Nation Army first gained widespread attention at the 2006 World Cup in Germany, when it was a major hit in stadiums and became the unofficial song of the Italian national team.

Fans all around the world have adapted it to include the names of their favorite players in the seven-note chorus, including Javier Mascherano, Santi Cazorla, Robin van Persie, and, most recently, Chucky Lozano.

So what is the significance of the soccer cry Seven Nation Army?

Why Is Seven Nation Army A Soccer Chant

In the same way that most great stories begin, the origins of the soccer cry Seven Nation Army occurred in a tavern, just before a soccer match took place. It is not the band’s humble beginnings or even its catchy riff that distinguishes it as a singular force in soccer culture; rather, it is the capacity of people all over the world, regardless of language or background, to join together in a single chorus that distinguishes Seven Nation Army. The song Seven Nation Army by the White Stripes has enjoyed a comeback as a soccer chant at the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

After becoming a major hit in stadiums across Germany during the 2006 World Cup, Seven Nation Army went on to become the unofficial anthem of the Italian national team.

To accommodate their favorite players’ names into the seven-note chorus, fans throughout the world have adapted the song, including Javier Mascherano, Santi Cazorla and Robin van Persie in addition to Chucky Lozano.

So, what is the significance of the soccer cry “Seven Nation Army” for you? One has travel back to 2003, seven months after the song was released as the lead single from The White Stripes’ fourth studio album, “Elephant,” in order to find out why.

Global Spread

A tour to Bruges by AS Roma, which included luminaries such as Francesco Totti, Daniele de Rossi, and Simone Perrotta, occurred in February 2006, long after most American radio stations had ceased playing Seven Nation Army. As soon as the Italians (both fans and players) heard Club Brugges’ Seven Nation Army anthem, they were immediately enthralled by it. Totti, according to reports, immediately rushed out and purchased the first White Stripes album he could locate. The Roma fans transported the chant back to Rome with them, and it gradually gained popularity, being known in Italy as the “po po po” song, despite the fact that Totti misunderstands the lyrics.

  1. Throughout the tournament, spectators sang along with the well-known Seven Nation Army cry, but nowhere was it more popular than when the Azzurri were on the field.
  2. Getty Images images are used in this embed.
  3. The United States contributed a significant share of the World Cup viewers in 2006, although the United States Men’s National Team was eliminated in the group stage (but not before giving Italy a black eye in what should have been an American victory).
  4. Particularly notable is the fact that Penn State football supporters at Beaver Stadium have adopted it as a part of their gameday repertory.
  5. A marching band version of the song was licensed immediately, and 2,000 CDs were sold in a short period of time.
  6. “We Are The Champions,” ” Rock And Roll Part II,” and ” Sweet Caroline” were among the usual American stadium favorites that were played at everything from the 2008 Euros to the NFL.
  7. The constant buzzing of the vuvuzela took the place of any chanting, singing, or other forms of music of any type.

2018 World Cup Revival

Throughout the decade of the 2010s, “Seven Nation Army” remained a popular soccer cry throughout Europe (and at American sporting events). Originally, clubs used it to recognize particular players whose names corresponded to the seven-syllable refrain, but it fell out of favor – until this summer, that is. Since 2006, the World Cup has been held in Europe, and the White Stripes have returned to the world’s largest stage for the first time since 2006. Even though soccer chants have become increasingly popular, Seven Nation Army remains a popular choice.

Colombian fans coerced El Tigre Falcao into appearing in the song’s lyrics.

All of this is simply another chapter in the story of how and why Seven Nation Army became a soccer chant – a chant that doesn’t appear to be going away anytime soon.

What a passionate following the Mexican national team has. MEXICO 2018 RUSIA JugamosDeLocales ElChuckyLozano MEXSWEpic.twitter.com/XKKQKiGSg5

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Even if you are unfamiliar with Seven Nation Army, it is likely that you are familiar with the opening seven notes. According to Jack White, the creator of Seven Nation Army, a song that has become the most popular sports anthem of all time — and which will have a significant presence during this year’s FIFA World Cup — “It is one of the things I am most happy to have been a part of.” (Image courtesy of Facebook/The White Stripes) Even if you are unfamiliar with the White Stripes’ song Seven Nation Army, the recognizable beginning chords will almost likely be familiar to you.

  1. The song, which was first published in March 2003, quickly rose to become the biggest hit for the Detroit combo.
  2. Those seven small notes, which are now shouted by millions of people all over the world — particularly at soccer stadiums, but also in sports arenas ranging from hockey rinks to basketball courts — have taken on a life of their own.
  3. So, how did the soccer team Seven Nation Army become such a sensation?
  4. And what does the band’s lead singer, Jack White, think of the song being appropriated by football fans?
  5. It all started with Belgians in Italy, as the saying goes.
  6. According to legend, it all began in a Milan pub in 2003 when visiting Club Brugge fans, who were in town for a match against A.C.
  7. In 2006, when the city of Brugge hosted a UEFA Cup match against A.S.
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During a recent interview, Roma captain Francesco Totti stated that “I had never heard the song until we got onto the field in Bruges.” “I haven’t been able to get the ‘Po po po po poo pooo’ out of my brain since then.” It sounded wonderful, and the audience erupted in enthusiastic applause right away.

Individuals and groups have put their own twist on it.

“We’re the navy blue army,” followers of Scotland’s Falkirk team added to the song, while supporters of Oldham Athletic in Manchester shouted the more embarrassing “We’re following Oldham.” Sheffield United fans sang “We’re the red and white army,” while their opponents, Sheffield Wednesday, responded with “Dirty red and white bastards.” Sheffield United won the match 2-1.

It’s more than simply a soccer chant, either.

After being featured in a Miami Heat hype video, the song was parodied by the San Antonio Spurs; it has been played between innings at home games by the Los Angeles Dodgers; it served as the goal song for the New Jersey Devils; and Formula One driver Nico Rosberg was able to get the crowd to sing along when he competed in the 2016 Italian Grand Prix.

A.S.

Roma, convinced the marching band to play it in 2006.

Jack White like the fact that it has evolved into a folk standard.

I am really pleased of being a part of it as a songwriter, and it is one of the things I am most proud of being a part of.” Modern folk music, which can be found all over the world, is created when big groups of people get together, rather than in small groups in homes and villages as it used to be.

“What excites me the most is that people are chanting a melody, which distinguishes it from chants such as ‘Thank God I’m a Country Boy’ and ‘We Will Rock You,’ as well as many of the most popular songs, in which huge groups prefer to clap or shout lyrics rather than simply notes,” says the author.

Given that the White Stripes weren’t exactly known for attracting sports crowds, and that soccer fans — particularly those from outside North America — aren’t known for their appreciation of American indie bands, it’s no surprise that many of the fans have no idea where the melody they’re singing came from during the match.

  • In fact, he considers it to be a badge of honor.
  • In the filmYankee Doodle Dandy, there is a scene in which George M.
  • “There is a scene in which George M.
  • The less people know about the song’s origins, the more it becomes embedded in folk music history, and the more it appears nameless to the general public, the more content I am as a songwriter.” It was almost as though the song would never be recorded.
  • While doing a sound check in Melbourne, White came up with the now-famous riff.
  • ‘I practiced the riff in front of Meg White and our buddy Ben Swank for a long time,’ White said in an interview with the Detroit Free Press.
  • And, more specifically, what is the Seven Nation Army?
  • The song is even more prominent at this year’s FIFA World Cup, which is taking place in Russia.
  • This was something Jack was willing to undertake because the sport element of the song started with football — first with Club Brugge and then with A.S.
  • Considering that Poland qualified for the World Cup, we felt it was appropriate to have this happen during this World Cup.

The song is an authentic folk song, and we want to give people the freedom to interpret its meaning in whichever way they wish, whether it’s via sports, community, or themes of endurance.”

How ‘Seven Nation Army’ Became A Football Anthem

The opening seven notes of Seven Nation Army are probably familiar to you even if you don’t know who they belong to. According to Jack White, the creator of Seven Nation Army, a song that has become the most popular sports anthem of all time — and which will have a prominent presence during this year’s FIFA World Cup — “It is one of the things I am most happy to have been a part of.” According to The White Stripes’ Facebook page, they are: The opening chords of the White Stripes’ song “Seven Nation Army” are identifiable, even if you are unfamiliar with the band’s music.

  1. Released in 2003, the song quickly rose to the top of charts and became the biggest hit for the Detroit-based combo.
  2. They have taken on a life of their own, and are now chanted by millions throughout the world, particularly at soccer stadiums, but also in other sports arenas ranging from ice hockey rinks to basketball courts.
  3. So, how did the soccer team Seven Nation Army become such a huge success story?
  4. In addition, what does the band’s lead singer, Jack White, think of the song being appropriated by football fans?
  5. Italians were the ones who started it all: Belgians.
  6. According to legend, it all began in a Milan bar in 2003 when visiting Club Brugge fans, who were in town for a match against A.C.
  7. In 2006, when the city of Brugge hosted a UEFA Cup match against A.S.

During a recent interview, Roma captain Francesco Totti stated that “I had never heard the song until we went on the pitch in Bruges.” The phrase ‘Po po po po poo pooo’ has been stuck in my brain ever since.

I went out and purchased one of the band’s albums as soon as I got home.

It was also played when the teams stepped onto the field at Euro 2008.

To the melody, Falkirk supporters sang “We’re the navy blue army,” while supporters of Oldham Athletic in Manchester sang “We’re following Oldham,” which was a little odd.

Occasionally, when a player scores a goal, the song is used to sing the player’s name.

After first becoming popular as a soccer anthem, the song slowly gained popularity among other major sports leagues, including the National Football League (NFL), the National Hockey League (NHL), and even the WWE.

Then, how did it become popular in other sports after it was first used in soccer?

Roma’s usage of the song, convinced the marching band to perform it.

Jack White appreciates that it has evolved into a folk tune.

But, economics aside, he is overjoyed by the song’s success since the song’s distinctively rock riff has become a folk standard.

And, of course, this will frequently occur in sporting stadiums, particularly soccer fields,” White stated in an interview with the Detroit Free Press.

White is unconcerned by the fact that the majority of people are unable to identify the source of the music.

Nevertheless, White is unconcerned about this.

In particular, I appreciate the fact that most people have no idea where the music they are singing originated from.

Cohan who expressed this sentiment about his song Over There in a scene from the film Yankee Doodle Dandy,” stated White in an interview.

Cohan expresses this sentiment about his song Over There.” In turn, this invigorates and motivates me, and it makes me feel happy to have served as a channel and antenna at one point in time for others to express themselves.

Even though the song Seven Nation Army has become one of the most well-known songs in the world, it was nearly never released.

He performed it for his bandmate and a buddy, neither of whom were especially taken with it.

In the first, I seemed to be the only one who found it intriguing; nevertheless, my musical friends soon became fans of it as well.

In addition, what is the Seven Nation Army actually.

Even more prominently featured during this year’s FIFA World Cup is the song.

This was something Jack was willing to do because the sport element of the song started with football — first with Club Brugge, then with A.S.

Considering that Poland qualified for the World Cup, we felt it was appropriate to make this happen for this tournament.

As a real folk song, we want people to define its meaning in whichever way they wish, whether it’s via sports or community or themes of endurance or whatever else they can think of.

Detroit’s global sports anthem: The White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nation Army’

Over the course of the past two weeks, there has been at least one consistent constant in a World Cup replete with surprises, shocks, and all sorts of drama: the “Seven Nation Army.” The 2003 White Stripes song is enjoying its most extensive airplay yet as the entrance music for every match at this summer’s international soccer tournament, marking the climax of a lengthy, grassroots climb that has elevated it to the status of the most popular sports anthem in the world.

  • In addition to being played inside stadiums before teams take to the field, the Detroit duo’s tune is frequently drowned out on television as tens of thousands of fans chant along to the song.
  • In the 16 years since it was first performed at a concert sound check, Jack White’s seven-note riff has evolved into something genuinely transcendent, being performed and sung at events all around the world.
  • Soon, it became a regular at stadiums and arenas across the United States for games of all types — frequently accompanied by a mass singalong, which was unusual in American sports at the time — while also becoming the most ubiquitous sound in the world of soccer outside.
  • In the process of energizing the people in Russian stadiums and reaching the ears of more than 3 billion World Cup spectators, “Seven Nation Army” has solidified its illustrious history.
  • When it comes to “Seven Nation Army,” the White Stripes parted ways in 2011, and Jack White is just “happy that I was a conduit and antenna at one point in time for other individuals to help express themselves,” as he told the Free Press in 2016.

‘What excites me the most is that people are chanting along to a melody, which distinguishes it from chants such as ‘Thank God I’m a Country Boy’ and ‘We Will Rock You,’ as well as many of the most popular songs, in which large groups tend to clap or sing words rather than just notes,’ White explained.

  • As Ian Montone, White’s longtime manager, explains, “the sport side of this folk song originated with football — first with (Belgian club) Club Brugge and then with (Italian club) A.S.
  • Jack agreed to this because the sport side of this folk song originated with football — first with (Belgian club) Club Brugge and then A.S.
  • The timing of this World Cup, particularly in light of Poland’s qualification, was appropriate, according to the team.
  • But it’s unlikely that anyone in that studio had any idea what was in store for them.
  • The pair had completed their main performance and were preparing to return to the stage to perform their “Seven Nation Army” encore — and the audience was already in full voice.
  • “Can you tell me when was the last time you heard something like that?” Nobody has ever chanted ‘Smoke on the Water’ or ‘Iron Man’ in my presence, to my knowledge.
  • The Detroit Pistons, Detroit Lions, and Detroit Tigers have all included it in their in-game music libraries.
  • And Detroit may get another major taste of “Seven Nation Army” next week: the Detroit Lions are scheduled to host the game.

It was originally supposed to take place on Belle Isle on Tuesday, but a permit was rejected, so the crew is looking for a different location.)

An unmistakable riff

The hook appears in two versions on the White Stripes’ recorded version: a gloomy phrase that appears throughout the song’s verses — seeming like a bass, but made by White using a vintage guitar and an effects pedal — and squalls of slide guitar that explode in between the verses and choruses. It would be difficult to argue that it isn’t the most instantly recognized rock riff of the twenty-first century — and indeed, it ranks right up there with the likes of “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Walk This Way” among the best-known rock riffs ever recorded.

  1. White’s brother gave him a 1950 Kay Hollowbody from the St.
  2. A powerful bass line, according to Stan Fracker, the Detroit Tigers’ director of in-game entertainment, is what sticks out in this track.
  3. When Jack White came up with an idea, it was immediately popular with the public.
  4. According to Fracker, “we’ll use it at critical moments, whenever we know we’ll need a lift from the audience.” “There are a lot of tunes that are played in ballparks and stadiums all around the United States.
  5. That is what distinguishes it from the competition.
  6. When the melody’s descending notes are introduced, the feel is strong, even martial, although the rhythmic triplet that precedes them sneaks in a little of effervescent brightness as well.
  7. White’s decision to exclude a chorus contributes to the song’s flexibility as a chant as well as its overall musicality.
  8. When it came to writing “Seven Nation Army,” White claimed that one of the exercises and challenges he had as a songwriter was to refrain from including a chorus in the song.
  9. According to Justin Brunken, who co-founded the group in 2007, the chant is frequently spontaneous, exploding during the ecstasy that follows a goal.
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A high point with ‘Elephant’

The White Stripes’ debut album, “Seven Nation Army,” was released at a critical juncture in their career. Jack and Meg White, who had spent their early years performing in the little clubs of Detroit’s Cass Corridor, were finally breaking through with their 2001 album “White Blood Cells.” Despite the fact that they were not enormous rock stars at the time, Blackwell believes the writing was on the wall for them. “What (musicians) create at that moment is frequently their pinnacle achievement.” In the case of the White Stripes, a lot of people would agree that their album ‘Elephant’ is the finest thing they ever accomplished.” At a sound check before to the Corner Hotel show in Melbourne, Jack White came up with the now-famous guitar riff that would become his signature piece of music.

According to Meg White and our buddy Ben Swank, “I played the riff over and again” in front of them, according to the Free Press.

In a London studio, as part of the “Elephant” recordings, “Seven Nation Army” was recorded three months later after the song had been fleshed out and the lyrics had been added.

“I recall having a talk with Meg during that period,” Blackwell said afterwards.

Beginnings of a sports anthem

  • When the White Stripes formed, they were going through a period of transition. “Seven Nation Army” was the result of that transition. The White Blood Cells’ debut album, “White Blood Cells,” was released in 2001, and it marked the band’s big break after years of working in the Cass Corridor. According to Blackwell, the band “weren’t great rock stars at the time,” but they “weren’t going anywhere.” “It is often the case that what (musicians) create in that moment is their zenith.” In the case of the White Stripes, a lot of people would agree that their album ‘Elephant’ is their greatest work.” At a sound check prior to the Corner Hotel show in Melbourne, Jack White created the now-famous riff that would become his signature piece. White labeled the piece “Bond Theme” in his notebooks, with the intention of storing it in case a film soundtrack came knocking. According to Meg White and our buddy Ben Swank, “I practiced the riff over and over again in front of them.” In the first, I seemed to be the only one who found it intriguing
  • Nevertheless, my musical friends soon became fans of it as well. It’s become part of White Stripes legend that Swank was disdainful of the riff at first, asking White whether it was a variant on Bob Seger’s “2+2=?” When Blackwell said it, he laughed. “It takes that Midwestern, no-big-deal mindset to say that.” In a London studio, as part of the “Elephant” recordings, “Seven Nation Army” was recorded three months later after the song had been fleshed out and the lyrics had been written. Due to the success of their previous single, “White Blood Cells,” the White Stripes decided to hold off on releasing the album, and it was over a year before fans were treated to “White Blood Cells.” The chat with Meg, Blackwell recalled, “took place throughout that time interval.” ‘Seven Nation Army’ was a big event, and she had this type of tone in her voice that made it a foregone conclusion that it was a big deal.” It was released in spring 2003, with the lead single “Seven Nation Army” spending three weeks at the top of Billboard’s alternative music list and reaching the top ten in several other countries across the world.

How “Seven Nation Army” Became the World’s Most Recognizable Song

According to writer Alec Wilkinson, in his recent New Yorker feature of Jack White, he made an unpleasant prediction about the bon vivant, rock musician, label owner, and analogue aficionado, which was as follows: “More people are familiar with a snippet of White’s music than are familiar with his name.” “Seven Nation Army,” a song by The White Stripes released in 2003, contains a famous seven-note line that acts as both the verse and chorus.

In the words of Wilkinson, “it’s possible that it’s the second most well-known guitar line in popular music.” “It’s the one from ‘Satisfaction,'” she says.

However, upon closer scrutiny, it is found to be insufficiently bold.

Two counter-intuitive narratives are advanced in this argument: first, that the traditional understanding of a folk song has become anachronistic to the point of stereotype, and second, that the sports anthem—a genre most associated with the daft, soulless, and unabashedly commercial aspects of songwriting (ie,Jock Jams)—is the last remaining musical monoculture.

Most people believe that the definition of folk music is the record-store definition: a singer-songwriter with an acoustic guitar performing in a coffee cafe, “he explained to me one day recently.” “In my opinion, the term goes far beyond than that.” Place says that the concept has to be extended as well as localized in order to be relevant in today’s world.

  • In order to develop their own music, songwriters are increasingly drawing on the traditions that they learned as children in their home towns.
  • Nowadays, the sole vehicle for such sentiments is the national anthem of a sporting event.
  • In the past, many have asserted that if you can write only one song like that in your lifetime—a song that people remember long after the composer has passed away—then you have truly completed a folk song.
  • In today’s society, folk music is created when big groups of people get together in a public space rather than in tiny homes and villages as it was in the past.
  • 6 in a survey of Detroit’s 100 Greatest Songs, which was conducted at the time.
  • Known as an ardent turn-of-the-century American music historian, MacMahon has devoted a significant portion of the past decade to tracing the origins of pre-Dust Bowl folk tunes.
  • It is set at the period when popular music began to transition from being created and marketed to reasonably rich individuals in the city to recording impoverished communities in rural America with the intention of selling their own music back to them.
  • To be completely honest with you, I have no idea what the ‘Seven Nation Army’ is all about or what they do.
  • To be honest, the subject content for the song came to him far later in the process than the distinctive riff.

It appeared like I was the only one who found it intriguing at the time, but it ultimately gained acceptance among my musical friends!”

“To be honest with you, I have no idea what ‘Seven Nation Army’ is about. But in that tradition, where authorship is beyond the point, it’s definitely a folk song.”

The White Stripes’ fourth and most successful album, Elephant, begins with the song “Seven Nation Army.” In the years before that, White had spent the better part of his adult life guiding the garage rock duo out of Detroit’s burgeoning bowling-alley rock scene, merging high-art conceptuality with a juvenile sensibility and snake oil salesmanship with deftness. When asked about playing arenas or writing songs that would become Top 40 singles, he told a Dutch film crew in 2001, “We don’t believe we’ll be playing stadiums; we don’t compose songs that will be Top 40 hits.” Just two years later, White had determined that such a goal was achievable and that the opening track, with its thick, ersatz bass and stomping beat, would serve as the album’s calling card, requesting that it be released as the first single despite opposition from the record label.

  1. “Seven Nation Army” became a touchstone for its songwriter almost immediately after its release in March 2003, garnering the White Stripes a Grammy for Best Rock Recording while also propelling the band into the Top 10 of the Billboard 200 chart in America.
  2. It’s a little odd that Jack White, a majordomo of obscure folk tunes, has accidentally constructed his own on the world’s greatest platform while performing on the same stage.
  3. White is the youngest of ten children and the seventh son.
  4. UEFA Champions League group stage action was about to begin that October evening when the Belgian football team was due to face Italian superpower A.C.
  5. During a pre-drinking session at a local pub, K.V.’s followers, known fondly as the Blue Army, became enchanted by a song playing on the sound system—a basic riff they could sing while inebriated, without being distracted by English words.
  6. The Blue Army, sensing a good thing, brought the cry back to their base.
  7. Eventually, it was adopted as the team’s goal song, which was played over the stadium’s public address system after every goal.
  8. Roma’s victory against K.V.
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When asked about the song by a Dutch journalist, Roma captain Francesco Totti said, “I had never heard it until we went on the pitch in Bruges.” “I haven’t been able to get the ‘Po po po po po po po’ out of my brain since then.” It sounded wonderful, and the audience erupted in enthusiastic applause right away.

And the “po po po po” song was on its way to becoming a hit.

According to White at the time, “I am honored that the Italians have accepted this song as their own.” Years later, he expressed himself a little more eloquently on the phenomena.

“What thrills me the most,” White said at the time, “is that people are chanting a melody, which separates it from chants like ‘Thank God I’m a Country Boy’ and ‘We Will Rock You’ and many of the most popular songs where large groups tend to clap or sing words and not just notes.”

After being adopted as the unofficial anthem of soccer in 2006 (where it was played during every game during the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Euro Cups and continues to be a chant song for local and national teams across the continent), “Seven Nation Army” has since become the unofficial anthem of sports all over the world. Once it made its way across the Atlantic to North America via Penn State’s football program, the riff quickly spread throughout the amateur sporting world on its way to becoming a staple at the majority of stadiums across the entire spectrum of professional sports (and strangely enough, it has taken on a special significance in Baltimore, where it serves as the pregame song for both the city’s football and baseball teams).

  1. It’s reasonable to say that today, it’s more notable not to hear it during a professional sports game anyplace in the western globe.
  2. After all, it had most certainly been performed in front of millions of soccer fans before becoming popular.
  3. So, what precisely was in the air on the nights preceding those Euro championship games?
  4. However, given the publicity, it’s not difficult to see why it went viral.
  5. While the foundations of the music and entertainment industries crumble, sports continue to provide a vital and dependable focal point for all forms of media (live sporting events remain the major reason for cable subscriptions, for example).

As a result, the number of people who have, mostly unconsciously, adopted that riff into their lives—whether through the games, countless remixes, or endless cultural renewals in films, commercials, and televised singing competitions—is unquestionably in the billions, whether or not they were aware of it.

And “Seven Nation Army” is unquestionably the current anthem of international sport.

Having spent the better part of his professional life as America’s foremost musical purist, archivist, and self-promoter, White appears to be the type of guy who would wear the popularity, perversity, and digital extension of what will inevitably be his most important musical contribution like an albatross around the neck of his most important musical contribution.

“I really enjoy the fact that the vast majority of people have no idea what song the tune they are singing is from,” he told the Detroit Free Press.

Why is White Stripes song ‘Seven Nation Army’ a football anthem?

With its instantly recognizable seven-note opening intro, the White Stripes’ hallmark song has long ago found a home at football stadiums around the country. If you are at a sporting event or watching it on television, it is very common to hear the White Stripes’ classic song ‘Seven Nation Army,’ which is chanted by fans all around the world, as a background soundtrack. Over time, the song has established itself as a standard, common stadium anthem that is not exclusively associated with a certain group of fans.

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This is mainly due to the song’s catchiness and historical significance, which have helped it become a distinctive stadium anthem throughout the years. The initial seven notes are instantly recognizable by anybody, rock music aficionado or not, and they serve as the foundation for the rest of the song. ‘Seven Nation Army’ is one of those songs that you immediately try to play when you pick up a guitar or bass for the first time, and its simple yet effective opening – “Doo, doo doo doo doo DOOOOO doo” – making it the perfect method for followers to shout.

  1. However, despite the fact that it only reached number 76 on the Billboard Hot 100 after being released in March 2003, its status as a football anthem was established in just six months.
  2. It is impossible to forget a European night, and the Belgian fans had fueled up on many drinks before the match, which took place at a pub where the band “Seven Nation Army” happened to be playing.
  3. Three years later, in the same competition, Club Brugge faced off against Roma, with the result falling in the Italians’ favor once again.
  4. This led to the national football team of Italy adopting the phrase during their triumphant World Cup campaign in 2006.

White Stripes vocalist and guitarist Jack White expressed his gratitude for the song’s widespread reputation in football circles throughout the world, saying, “I am thrilled that the Italians have accepted this song as their own.” When people welcome a tune and allow it to enter the pantheon of folk music, there is nothing more wonderful in music than to see it.”

‘Seven Nation Army’ lyrics

I’m going to fight them off. A seven-nation military would be unable to maintain me once more. They’re going to take advantage of you. They’re taking their time right behind my back. And I’m chatting to myself at night since I’m unable to concentrate during the day. My thoughts take me back and forth. In the shadow of a cigarette “Leave it alone,” says the message emanating from my eyes. I don’t want to be reminded of it. Everyone is aware of it since every single person has gotten a narrative to share with them.

  1. But that ain’t what you need to hear right now.
  2. In addition to the feeling emanating from my bones “Find a place to call home,” it says.
  3. I’ll be working the straw.
  4. And I’m not going to sing any more, and the stains on my clothes are telling me to “go back home.”

Seven Nation Army: the indiest football anthem ever?

This time, I’m going to take them down one by one. It would be impossible for a seven-nation military to keep me at bay once more. This is something they’re going to take advantage of. It appears like they are taking their time right behind my back Moreover, I’m talking to myself at night since I’m unable to sleep. My thoughts have been going back and forth. A cigarette is hidden behind a bush. Moreover, the message emanating from my eyes is “Leave it alone.” No, I don’t want to hear that. It’s been brought to everyone’s attention that every single person has a tale to share.

However, it is exactly what I want to do.

“Find a place to live,” it says.

Create a puddle of perspiration in every pore, and I’m bleeding, and I’m bleeding, and I’m bleeding Right before the Lord, all of my words are going to bleed from my mouth.

Songs of The Ohio State University

First and foremost, here is an introduction from Wikipedia: “The White Stripes’ seventh studio album, Elephant, contains the song Seven Nation Army, which is the band’s first single from the album. In 2003, it was released as a single under the label RCA Records. Three weeks after debuting at No. 1 on the Modern Rock Tracks, Seven Nation Army took home the Grammy Award for Best Rock Song in 2004. The underlying riff of the song is well-known, and it can be heard throughout the majority of the song.

According to the set notes in the booklet that accompanied the Under Blackpool Lights DVD, the riff was developed during a sound check before a gig at the Corner Hotel in Melbourne, Australia.

The primary theme of Anton Bruckner’s Fifth Symphony served as inspiration for this piece.

Seven Nation Army was ranked number 8 on Q magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks, published in March of that year.

In May 2008, Rolling Stone magazine ranked this song as the 21st best guitar song of all time on their list of the 100 greatest guitar songs of all time.

In 2009, Seven Nation Army was ranked 20th on Triple J’s Hottest 100 Of All Time list, which was compiled by the radio station.

According to the bass guitar riff, the audience would yell “Oh” (with a long “O”) like follows (imagine Morse Code on the “.” and “-” in the next sentence): Oh-Oh.Oh.Oh.

Oh-Oh, Oh-Oh.Oh.Oh.

More information may be found on Wikipedia: “As a fan pump-up song in American football and basketball games, Seven Nation Army has become particularly popular in the Big Ten, where fans first chant the riff in the chorus before the band joins in after a couple of verses.

This song has been played before kickoff at Ohio State football games since the start of the 2008 season.

Additionally, the song is frequently heard at home games for the University of Michigan and Purdue University, as well as during basketball games for the St.

However, while the OSUMB and Pep Bands each have their own rendition of the guitar riff, the cheer begins spontaneously and without urging.

The extended “Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh” that was formerly used before kickoffs has been replaced with the short “Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.” Naturally, the audience continues to chant “O-H-I-O” even after the kickoff has been completed successfully.

Despite this, they are well-liked by the student community and belong on a website dedicated to music and cheers associated with Ohio State University.

Nick Metrowsky is the webmaster for this site.

Member for the rest of one’s life a life member of the Ohio State University President’s Club and a member of the Ohio State University Alumni Association Member of the Ohio State University Varsity “O” Association on an annual basis. The most recent update was made on September 23, 2021.

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