Wrestling What Chant

‘What’ chants are the worst thing about WWE and they need to stop

Stone Cold Steve Austin, then-WWE World Champion, made a statement in August 2001. On SmackDown, Steve Austin made his now-famous “What” chanting début during a promotional segment. It immediately rose to become the most cherished cry in the WWE, and it was actually amusing at the time it was introduced. 15 years later, “What” shouts are still the most annoying portion of WWE programming, and they are particularly detrimental to the company’s up-and-coming talents. Carmella has been the newest victim of the “What” chant, as she performed a fantastic job of roasting Nikki Bella on Tuesday night while the fans in Stone Cold’s home state chanted “What!” at every single pause.

During a 2015 episode of his podcast, Austin discussed the history of the “What” chant, and he stated that he had no regrets for initiating it.

The truth is, when someone is cutting a commercial and the audience begins yelling ‘WHAT, WHAT, WHAT’ every time they take a break, the best way to avoid this is to just don’t give them a pause in the first place.

Do I have any regrets?

  1. People used to have a lot of fun doing that back in the day, and guess what?
  2. We printed the words “what” and a question mark on the front of a t-shirt, and it resulted in a significant increase in sales.
  3. Instead, they may exploit that to their advantage by employing the skill.” Austin is correct about a couple of things here – it was entertaining back in the day, and he did sell a significant number of t-shirts at the time.
  4. When a crowd derails a nascent star’s (otherwise excellent) promotional campaign when they have done nothing to deserve it, it is not amusing.
  5. In spite of the fact that Carmella had the crowd enthralled with a wonderful “shut up, I’m talking” performed with a heavy New York accent, members of the audience attempted to hijack the promo.
  6. Some celebrities may be more adept at dealing with boisterous audiences, but attempting to make a point and advance your own personal plot while navigating a “What” chant shouldn’t be a weekly expectation for the majority of them.
  7. At the very least, the idea of fans harassing Chris Jericho with “sparklecrotch” chants is timely.
  8. It’s not even a chant that’s specifically intended against heels.

It’s insane, and it has to come to an end. In the case that you’re at a WWE live event and someone close to you joins in on the what chant, it is your responsibility as a fan to label them a dumb fool. The artists are deserving of a better deal.

WWE Twitter Account Asks Fans To Stop Doing The “WHAT” Chant

“Stone Cold”Steve Austin, future WWE Hall of Famer and future wrestling icon, found upon the world’s most convenient way to be irritating back in 2001. “What?” is a single, monosyllabic word that may be given in the middle of an adversary’s statement, and it can be used to be douchey, dismissive, and rude by everyone’s favorite heel in the game. It is that final one, some twenty years later, that is attracting the most attention. Fans, on the other hand, seized on the straightforward reaction and have been employing it ever since to express their dissatisfaction or discontent with a character or their current plot line.

  • Of course, when Austin pulled the stunt, he had every intention of making a fool of himself.
  • WWE executives, on the other hand, believe it is disrespectful to their talent since fans continue to use it to reject what they don’t like.
  • (They have since been removed, so feel free to interpret that anyway you wish.) This was the first message, which was posted during a RAW segment in which Jerry Lawler was interviewing Rusev, and it read: “Can we put an end to the shouts of ‘WHAT?'” It is no longer the year 2001.
  • The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  • “And now we’re back to RAW.” Despite the fact that the brass made their opinions known, it is unlikely that it will have much of an impact on the audience.
  • When it comes to live crowds, it’s like a sea of marks and smarks, and they take pleasure in their collective trolling.
  • Recently, he told Busted Open Radio, “I did it as a running heel at the time, you know, I was wearing heels at the time, and I left that message on Christian’s voicemail.” It seemed like every time I said something, I’d pause and think, ‘what?
  • You’re right, aren’t you?
  • Isn’t it true that I’m jabbing you?
  • So that was my first attempt at putting it to good use.
  • A huge part of being in WWE or in the wrestling business is that the audience wants to be involved, whether they are rooting for you or against you, applauding for you or booing you, or whatever.

As a part of the show, it provided an opportunity for them to become involved and contribute.” In the meantime, they’re still taking part and saying things like ‘Austin, why in the heck did you invent that, I wish you hadn’t done that’.” I would have never imagined it in a million years that…

“I wouldn’t have predicted…” Do you believe that the chanting are insulting to the wrestlers and their efforts? Or is it merely a harmless show of support from the crowd? Please share your opinions in the comments section!

Christian recalls a funny voicemail from Steve Austin that helped create the ‘What?’ chant

The ‘What?’ cry is one of the most well-known in wrestling history, and Stone Cold Steve Austin is the wrestler who is most closely connected with it than anybody else. Stone Cold was able to control the reaction of the audience so well during the peak of the Attitude Era in the WWE that he was able to get them to chant a simple four-letter phrase. Christian explained how he played a role in Steve Austin’s notorious cry and the history behind it in a recent interview with Wrestling Travel from the For The Love of Wrestling conference in Liverpool, which was published by Wrestling Inc.

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He left a rambling voicemail on my answering machine, which I received.

I mentioned that I was passing a tree.

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  • And more.

“When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me. And he says, “I don’t know, I was just bored and started babbling.” “I really wish I had saved it.” In the next week or so, I was watching Raw from the back row and I could hear the audio of him promoting himself in the ring, and I heard him say, “What?!?” And I thought to myself, “How is he going to accomplish this, and how is he going to get this over with?” Sure enough, he was able to complete the chorus.

That was far back in the early 2000s, to be precise.

There have been several memorable incidents associated with the phrase throughout WWE history.

The following story preceded the preceding story: Sports News Now.

WWE News: Stone Cold Steve Austin Details Inventing The ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. ‘What?’ shouts, popularized by Steve Austin in 2001, have been explained in depth for the first time. Since his appearance as the Alliance’s shining light in the summer of 2001, Austin’s persona has morphed into an increasingly paranoid leader. Stone Cold would use the one-word slogan ad naseum throughout interviews in an attempt to encourage his warriors in their struggle against the then-World Wrestling Federation. Austin recounted where the inspiration for ‘What?’ came from during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions.

Stone Cold recounted:

“Another issue is that folks often seem to wonder how I come up with the ‘What?’ question.” I dialed Christian’s cellphone and spoke with him. Of course, he didn’t answer the phone because it was me who was calling. So I left him this long-winded message, and every now and then I’d say something idiotic and think to myself, ‘what was I thinking?’ Keep moving and thinking ‘what’ as you go, and keep going. In all honesty, by the time I hung up the phone, I’d left him something like a two-minute voicemail, and I was working hard at the time.

Steve Austin began structuring his promotional material in order to anticipate the ‘What?’ response from the audience.

The chat included Randy Orton discussing his new insight about how essential promos are in professional wrestling, which he shared with the audience.

Photograph courtesy of The Broken Skull Sessions In the event that you use any quotes from this post, please give proper attribution and link back to Inside The Ropes.

This Day in Wrestling History (8/13) – Birth of “What?” Chant

Subscribe today to receive real-time updates straight to your device’s screen. As wrestling fans, we’re accustomed to a slew of catchphrases and chants that are frequently associated with a specific match or wrestler, and this day in wrestling history marks the birth of one that has stood the test of time. Following his betrayal of the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance on August 13, 2001, in which he debuted what would become his new cry. In the history of professional wrestling, Hugh Morrus was the first person to be the recipient of the most famous chant, which was later followed by Raven and Taz.

  • You have a body weight of 275 pounds.
  • What?
  • What?
  • Is that meant to be humorous?
  • What?
  • Take a look at me!
  • Y2J gave you a good thrashing.
  • “Take a step back.”

Curious origins and legacy

Subscribe today to receive real-time information straight to your smartphone. This Day in Wrestling History marks the beginning of one of the most famous sayings and chants in the history of the sport, and it also marks the beginning of another that has stood the test of time. Following his betrayal of the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance on August 13, 2001, during which he debuted what would become his new cry. In the history of professional wrestling, Hugh Morrus was the first person to be the recipient of the most famous chant, which he shared with Raven and Taz.

  • Mr.
  • What?
  • Hugh Morrus, please introduce yourself.
  • Is it anything to laugh about?
  • Is it amusing.
  • Are you trying to make me laugh?
  • You’re a complete and utter disappointment!
  • You’re a complete and utter disappointment!
  • Y’all have made me feel embarrassed.

10 Chants That Don’t Need To Return With The WWE Universe

The return of the WWE Universe to the arena is something that everyone is looking forward to. A genuine atmosphere has been severely missed on Raw and SmackDown throughout the epidemic, and there is little question that the entire product will improve as a result of the return of the fans to the arenas. Live fans, on the other hand, are not always beneficial. There have been several instances in which the WWE Universe’s shouting has really interfered with a match’s outcome. Sometimes, supporters may make a significant difference in the outcome of a match.

10″What!”

The return of the WWE Universe to the arena is something that everyone is looking forward to seeing. A genuine atmosphere has been severely missed on Raw and SmackDown throughout the epidemic, and there is little question that the entire product will improve as a result of the return of the fans. While there are certain advantages to having live fans, they are not always beneficial. A number of instances, the shouting of the WWE Universe has actually interfered with the performance of a wrestler during a bout.

Occasionally, supporters can make a significant contribution to a match; yet, there are certain shouts that can detract from the overall experience of a match or segment, and these are the ones that people would want to see avoided.

9″Fight Forever”

Assuming that this cry was utilized rarely and only during important main event narratives, there would be no issue. The reality is that this isn’t the case, since many supporters continue to use this cry on a consistent basis. When the WWE Universe chants away during a routine contest, it detracts from the impact of the chant when it is utilized in a huge event since it no longer means as much to the majority of the audience.

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8″We Want Tables”

The fact that Money in the Bank will have a large number of supporters means that there is a significant probability this chant will be heard. We can only hope that is not the case, since this is one of the most obnoxious chants that the WWE Universe has ever come up with. A table is usually present in a match with no rules that involves weapons, with viewers constantly preferring to see one. But while the wrestlers almost always incorporate a table in their matches, it is not something that should be screamed because yelling about it might disrupt the flow of a competition.

7″This Is Wrestling”

One of the weirdest chants that supporters participate in is this one, which is just stating the obvious. While it is intended to be done in a way that demonstrates that the supporters are really impressed by the quality, it is not a particularly effective chant. Because everyone is aware that it is wrestling, which is something that people have paid to watch, the entire objective of the chant is defeated right from the outset.

6″You Can’t Wrestle”

One of the weirdest chants that supporters participate in is this one, which simply states what everyone already knows. While it is intended to be done in a way that demonstrates that the supporters are extremely impressed by the quality, it is not a particularly effective chant in this situation. Given that wrestling is something for which people have paid to watch, the entire point of the shout is defeated straight away, and the chant is rendered completely ineffective.

5″10″

This is significantly less likely to happen now that Tye Dillinger is no longer a part of the WWE, but it did happen on a regular basis even when he wasn’t utilized much. This is something that supporters frequently do when the referee is counting someone out, and they usually do it at a different time than the player is counting them out. The fact of the matter is that this is plain bothersome. When done well, a 10 count may bring a great deal of drama and excitement to a match. However, when the crowd is engrossed in a chanting frenzy, the moment is rendered ineffective.

4″Boring”

It is certain that not every part will be excellent; this is something that can be assured. Even some moments that some fans adore will be despised by others, which has frequently resulted in “boring” shouts being heard throughout the years. While some fans may become bored during particular matches or parts, the wrestlers ought to be spared this shout because they deserve to be respected.

Plus, after such a long period of time without being able to watch wrestling live, can’t wrestling fans just relish being back in that environment once more?

3″You’ve Still Got It”

Even though this cry is intended to be a complement to those who hear it, the talent often feels elderly or as if the audience did not expect them to perform well. This can be effective in some situations, as as when Ricky Steamboat battled Chris Jericho. However, when someone who isn’t that old returns and is greeted with this chant, it doesn’t really make any sense to me at all. There won’t be any complaints if it doesn’t come back, and hopefully, that will be the case in this instance.

2″We Are Awesome”

There is no doubt that wrestling fans can make a significant impact to the quality of the product. Certain segments of the audience, on the other hand, attempt to make everything about them, which is always a source of great sadness to witness. When an audience is exceptionally boisterous when the show isn’t quite up to their standards, the chanting “we are fantastic” are frequently heard. These are by far the worst types of fans because they want the performance to be about them, rather than the talent, which should never be the case in the first place.

1″CM Punk”

One chant in particular should be avoided at all costs by the wrestling fans upon their return, and it is the one mentioned above. While CM Punk was a terrific wrestler and someone who would bring a lot to the table today, the reality of the matter is that he is no longer interested in becoming a professional wrestler. However, the repeated shouting of his name by the audience during various portions is quite irritating. It is not beneficial to the current product and does not demonstrate any respect for the abilities present in the ring at the time, which is why it should not be brought back.

  1. The Brothers of Destruction – The True Story Behind One Of WWE’S Worst Matches EverThe Brothers of Destruction vs.
  2. Instead, it developed into one of the worst matches in the history of the WWE.
  3. (A total of 2054 articles have been published.) Matthew Wilkinson is a writer living in the English city of Bradford.
  4. Matthew Wilkinson has more to say.

WWE Encouraging Fans To Do ‘What?!’ Chants For Some Reason

This is one of the chants that should be avoided at all costs by the wrestling fans upon their return. The reality of the matter is that, while CM Punk was a terrific wrestler and someone who would contribute significantly to the product today, he is no longer interested in becoming a wrestler. But the persistent screaming of his name by supporters throughout the show’s various parts is quite irritating. Therefore, it should not be brought back since it does nothing to benefit the current product or show any appreciation for the abilities present in the ring at the time.

The Brothers of Destruction – The Inside Story of One of WWE’s Worst Matches EverThe Brothers of Destruction vs.

The result was one of the worst contests in the history of the WWE.

The number of articles published has reached 2054. Originally from Bradford in England, Matthew Wilkinson is a writer. Twitter handle: @MC Wilkinson1 may be found here. Matthew Wilkinson has more to say about this.

Steve Austin On The Problem With The ‘What' Chant Being Used Today

This is one of the chants that should be avoided at all costs by wrestling fans upon their return. While CM Punk was a terrific wrestler and someone who would bring a lot to the table today, the reality of the matter is that he is no longer interested in becoming a wrestler. However, the persistent screaming of his name by supporters during various phases is really irritating. It is not beneficial to the current product and does not demonstrate any respect for the abilities present in the ring at the time, which is why it should not be reinstated.

  1. Kronik: The True Story Behind One Of WWE’s Worst Matches EverThe Brothers of Destruction vs.
  2. Instead, it developed into one of the worst matches in the history of WWE.
  3. (2054 Articles Have Been Published) Matthew Wilkinson is a writer who lives in the English city of Bradford.
  4. Matthew Wilkinson has more to say about it.
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r/SquaredCircle – What is up with “What?” chants?

This is one of the chants that should be avoided at all costs by the wrestling fans as they return to the arena. While CM Punk was a tremendous wrestler and someone who would bring a great deal to the product today, the reality of the matter is that he is no longer interested in becoming a wrestler. However, the persistent shouting of his name by supporters during various phases is really bothersome. It does nothing to benefit the current product and shows no regard for the abilities present in the ring at the time, which is why it should not be brought back.

  • Kronik: The True Story Behind One of WWE’s Worst Matches EverThe Brothers of Destruction vs.
  • Instead, it devolved into one of the worst bouts in the history of the WWE.
  • About the AuthorMatthew Wilkinson (A total of 2054 articles have been published) Matthew Wilkinson is a writer residing in Bradford, England.
  • More from Matthew Wilkinson

Sami Zayn Not a Fan of the “You Deserve It!” Chants In Pro Wrestling

Sami Zayn, according to reports, is not a fan of the “You deserve it!” chants that are common in professional wrestling. When a wrestler wins a significant match or becomes a champion, fans frequently yell “You deserve it!” at him or her. Zayn recently appeared on Renee Paquette’s “Oral Sessions” podcast, where they talked about the chant in detail. “My favorite shout in wrestling is ‘You deserve it!’,” he remarked sarcastically. I’m like, ‘Do you want to?’ ‘Do you think you’re worth anything?'” Paquette pointed out that it is the crowd, not the wrestler, who are chanting this phrase.

  1. ‘I worked really hard for this, and I truly deserve it.’ No, I don’t believe that is the case.
  2. “What is the most significant source of…dissatisfaction?
  3. It’s not because I’m deserving of anything.
  4. I’m no more deserving of it than everyone else in this world.
  5. I feel it is primarily due to good fortune.
  6. Whatever.
  7. Wrestling is something I’m extremely good at.

“Not everyone is as talented as you.” A lot of folks put in long hours at a variety of jobs and don’t receive enough time off.

It’s past time to recognize this fact..

‘You got fortunate!’ is a phrase I would prefer to hear.

That would be a more appropriate description.

‘You were quite fortunate!’ It’s hardly the most creative chant in the world, but you make it work, folks.

That’s the fact of the matter. “It’ll be hard labor, for sure, but whatever.” (With thanks to Fightful for the quotation. ) Marc may be found on Twitter at @this is marc. By clicking here, you may send us any news, tips, or corrections that you have.

Daniel Bryan’s Yes Chants: A Look Back at the WWE Phenomenon

Photo courtesy of WWE.com In the aftermath of WrestleMania last year, a single, repeated word had a lasting impact and boosted Daniel Bryan’s professional wrestling career. Yes! Yes, yes, yes! Bryan’s “Yes!” chants are still going strong, but it looks like a new trend is gaining over. Fandango’s theme music is becoming increasingly popular, to the point that it is currently charting in the United Kingdom singles charts (h/t WrestleZone.com). It was fun to hear fans humming the ballroom dancer/tune wrestler’s on Monday Night Raw following WrestleMania 29 and even after the show went off the air.

Bryan had just lost his world championship to Sheamus at WrestleMania 28 in a matter of 18 seconds.

In an interview with GQ.com, Tom Breihan inquired about Bryan’s thoughts on the chanting that followed WrestleMania.

Or it’s possible that they weren’t getting behind me.

I walked out and competed in a post-showdark match, and it was a truly great moment when they showed their support for me wholeheartedly.

Bryan departed the ring as a throng of adoring fans raised their hands and chanted enthusiastically.

It became a sensation that spread well beyond the confines of the ring and the confines of the WWE universe.

It was chanted at Ring of Honor performances, TNA events, and independent events, among other places.

The chantonThe Soup was performed by Joel McHale.

When Josh Reddick, of the Oakland Athletics and currentbeard-off contestant(h/t CBSSports.com), walked up to the plate, a segment of the crowd gave him the Daniel Bryan treatment, according to the website.

It might be applicable to almost any situation or situational situation.

Bryan’s job security with WWE improved as a result of the chant.

It became a crucial aspect of his personality as a result.

He needed anger management lessons because of this, and it was this that led to his wildly entertaining stint with Kane as a dysfunctional tag team—and the duo taking home a tag team championship as a result of their efforts.

“Yes!” shouts aren’t going away anytime soon, but they won’t be able to sustain the level of popularity they had at their peak indefinitely.

It is possible that they will join the cries “What?” and “Woo!” in becoming chants that persist longer than the wrestlers who began them.

When his theme song appears on a WWE T-shirt, when spectators at a baseball game hum it, and when fans create a 10-hour movie of the tune, we will know that Fandango has come in full.

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